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Title: Self-organized patterning of molecularly thin liquid polymer films utilizing molecular flow induced by ultraviolet irradiation

Abstract

A self-organized patterning method for molecularly thin liquid polymer films on solid surfaces has been demonstrated. In contrast to conventional methods that prepattern solid surfaces and then use the patterns as templates for polymer films, this method utilizes self-organization of polymers induced by ultraviolet (UV) radiation through a mask, thereby directly patterning the polymer films and omitting the prepatterning process. Such UV irradiation locally modified the interaction between polymer films and solid surfaces. As a result, molecular flow occurred at the boundary between the irradiated and nonirradiated areas, leading to three-dimensional surface structures.

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Department of Complex Systems Science, Graduate School of Information Science, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan)
  2. (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20960169
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 90; Journal Issue: 12; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2716358; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; FILMS; IRRADIATION; LIQUIDS; POLYMERS; THREE-DIMENSIONAL CALCULATIONS; ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION

Citation Formats

Zhang Hedong, Mitsuya, Yasunaga, Fukuoka, Natsuko, Imamura, Masashi, Fukuzawa, Kenji, and Department of Micro-Nano Systems Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603. Self-organized patterning of molecularly thin liquid polymer films utilizing molecular flow induced by ultraviolet irradiation. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2716358.
Zhang Hedong, Mitsuya, Yasunaga, Fukuoka, Natsuko, Imamura, Masashi, Fukuzawa, Kenji, & Department of Micro-Nano Systems Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603. Self-organized patterning of molecularly thin liquid polymer films utilizing molecular flow induced by ultraviolet irradiation. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2716358.
Zhang Hedong, Mitsuya, Yasunaga, Fukuoka, Natsuko, Imamura, Masashi, Fukuzawa, Kenji, and Department of Micro-Nano Systems Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603. Mon . "Self-organized patterning of molecularly thin liquid polymer films utilizing molecular flow induced by ultraviolet irradiation". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2716358.
@article{osti_20960169,
title = {Self-organized patterning of molecularly thin liquid polymer films utilizing molecular flow induced by ultraviolet irradiation},
author = {Zhang Hedong and Mitsuya, Yasunaga and Fukuoka, Natsuko and Imamura, Masashi and Fukuzawa, Kenji and Department of Micro-Nano Systems Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603},
abstractNote = {A self-organized patterning method for molecularly thin liquid polymer films on solid surfaces has been demonstrated. In contrast to conventional methods that prepattern solid surfaces and then use the patterns as templates for polymer films, this method utilizes self-organization of polymers induced by ultraviolet (UV) radiation through a mask, thereby directly patterning the polymer films and omitting the prepatterning process. Such UV irradiation locally modified the interaction between polymer films and solid surfaces. As a result, molecular flow occurred at the boundary between the irradiated and nonirradiated areas, leading to three-dimensional surface structures.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2716358},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 12,
volume = 90,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Mar 19 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Mon Mar 19 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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