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Title: Wafer-level filling of microfabricated atomic vapor cells based on thin-film deposition and photolysis of cesium azide

Abstract

The thin-film deposition and photodecomposition of cesium azide are demonstrated and used to fill arrays of miniaturized atomic resonance cells with cesium and nitrogen buffer gas for chip-scale atomic-based instruments. Arrays of silicon cells are batch fabricated on wafers into which cesium azide is deposited by vacuum thermal evaporation. After vacuum sealing, the cells are irradiated with ultraviolet radiation, causing the azide to photodissociate into pure cesium and nitrogen in situ. This technology integrates the vapor-cell fabrication and filling procedures into one continuous and wafer-level parallel process, and results in cells that are optically transparent and chemically pure.

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Electromagnetics Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States)
  2. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20960156
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 90; Journal Issue: 11; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2712501; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; AZIDES; CESIUM; CESIUM COMPOUNDS; DEPOSITION; EVAPORATION; FABRICATION; NITROGEN; PHOTOLYSIS; PHYSICAL RADIATION EFFECTS; SILICON; SOLAR CELLS; THIN FILMS; ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION

Citation Formats

Liew, Li-Anne, Moreland, John, Gerginov, Vladislav, and Time and Frequency Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305. Wafer-level filling of microfabricated atomic vapor cells based on thin-film deposition and photolysis of cesium azide. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2712501.
Liew, Li-Anne, Moreland, John, Gerginov, Vladislav, & Time and Frequency Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305. Wafer-level filling of microfabricated atomic vapor cells based on thin-film deposition and photolysis of cesium azide. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2712501.
Liew, Li-Anne, Moreland, John, Gerginov, Vladislav, and Time and Frequency Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305. Mon . "Wafer-level filling of microfabricated atomic vapor cells based on thin-film deposition and photolysis of cesium azide". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2712501.
@article{osti_20960156,
title = {Wafer-level filling of microfabricated atomic vapor cells based on thin-film deposition and photolysis of cesium azide},
author = {Liew, Li-Anne and Moreland, John and Gerginov, Vladislav and Time and Frequency Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305},
abstractNote = {The thin-film deposition and photodecomposition of cesium azide are demonstrated and used to fill arrays of miniaturized atomic resonance cells with cesium and nitrogen buffer gas for chip-scale atomic-based instruments. Arrays of silicon cells are batch fabricated on wafers into which cesium azide is deposited by vacuum thermal evaporation. After vacuum sealing, the cells are irradiated with ultraviolet radiation, causing the azide to photodissociate into pure cesium and nitrogen in situ. This technology integrates the vapor-cell fabrication and filling procedures into one continuous and wafer-level parallel process, and results in cells that are optically transparent and chemically pure.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2712501},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 11,
volume = 90,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Mar 12 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Mon Mar 12 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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