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Title: Testing General Relativity with Atom Interferometry

Abstract

The unprecedented precision of atom interferometry will soon lead to laboratory tests of general relativity to levels that will rival or exceed those reached by astrophysical observations. We propose such an experiment that will initially test the equivalence principle to 1 part in 10{sup 15} (300 times better than the current limit), and 1 part in 10{sup 17} in the future. It will also probe general relativistic effects--such as the nonlinear three-graviton coupling, the gravity of an atom's kinetic energy, and the falling of light--to several decimals. In contrast with astrophysical observations, laboratory tests can isolate these effects via their different functional dependence on experimental variables.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20957742
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review Letters; Journal Volume: 98; Journal Issue: 11; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.98.111102; (c) 2007 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; ATOMS; EQUIVALENCE PRINCIPLE; GENERAL RELATIVITY THEORY; GRAVITATION; INTERFEROMETRY; KINETIC ENERGY; NONLINEAR PROBLEMS; RELATIVISTIC RANGE

Citation Formats

Dimopoulos, Savas, Graham, Peter W., Hogan, Jason M., and Kasevich, Mark A.. Testing General Relativity with Atom Interferometry. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVLETT.98.111102.
Dimopoulos, Savas, Graham, Peter W., Hogan, Jason M., & Kasevich, Mark A.. Testing General Relativity with Atom Interferometry. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVLETT.98.111102.
Dimopoulos, Savas, Graham, Peter W., Hogan, Jason M., and Kasevich, Mark A.. Fri . "Testing General Relativity with Atom Interferometry". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVLETT.98.111102.
@article{osti_20957742,
title = {Testing General Relativity with Atom Interferometry},
author = {Dimopoulos, Savas and Graham, Peter W. and Hogan, Jason M. and Kasevich, Mark A.},
abstractNote = {The unprecedented precision of atom interferometry will soon lead to laboratory tests of general relativity to levels that will rival or exceed those reached by astrophysical observations. We propose such an experiment that will initially test the equivalence principle to 1 part in 10{sup 15} (300 times better than the current limit), and 1 part in 10{sup 17} in the future. It will also probe general relativistic effects--such as the nonlinear three-graviton coupling, the gravity of an atom's kinetic energy, and the falling of light--to several decimals. In contrast with astrophysical observations, laboratory tests can isolate these effects via their different functional dependence on experimental variables.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVLETT.98.111102},
journal = {Physical Review Letters},
number = 11,
volume = 98,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Mar 16 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Fri Mar 16 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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