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Title: Measurement of the Entropy and Critical Temperature of a Strongly Interacting Fermi Gas

Abstract

We report a model-independent measurement of the entropy, energy, and critical temperature of a degenerate, strongly interacting Fermi gas of atoms. The total energy is determined from the mean square cloud size in the strongly interacting regime, where the gas exhibits universal behavior. The entropy is measured by sweeping a bias magnetic field to adiabatically tune the gas from the strongly interacting regime to a weakly interacting regime, where the entropy is known from the cloud size after the sweep. The dependence of the entropy on the total energy quantitatively tests predictions of the finite-temperature thermodynamics.

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20957667
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review Letters; Journal Volume: 98; Journal Issue: 8; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.98.080402; (c) 2007 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; CRITICAL TEMPERATURE; ENTROPY; FERMI GAS; MAGNETIC FIELDS; RADIOACTIVE CLOUDS; THERMODYNAMICS

Citation Formats

Luo, L., Clancy, B., Joseph, J., Kinast, J., and Thomas, J. E. Measurement of the Entropy and Critical Temperature of a Strongly Interacting Fermi Gas. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVLETT.98.080402.
Luo, L., Clancy, B., Joseph, J., Kinast, J., & Thomas, J. E. Measurement of the Entropy and Critical Temperature of a Strongly Interacting Fermi Gas. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVLETT.98.080402.
Luo, L., Clancy, B., Joseph, J., Kinast, J., and Thomas, J. E. Fri . "Measurement of the Entropy and Critical Temperature of a Strongly Interacting Fermi Gas". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVLETT.98.080402.
@article{osti_20957667,
title = {Measurement of the Entropy and Critical Temperature of a Strongly Interacting Fermi Gas},
author = {Luo, L. and Clancy, B. and Joseph, J. and Kinast, J. and Thomas, J. E.},
abstractNote = {We report a model-independent measurement of the entropy, energy, and critical temperature of a degenerate, strongly interacting Fermi gas of atoms. The total energy is determined from the mean square cloud size in the strongly interacting regime, where the gas exhibits universal behavior. The entropy is measured by sweeping a bias magnetic field to adiabatically tune the gas from the strongly interacting regime to a weakly interacting regime, where the entropy is known from the cloud size after the sweep. The dependence of the entropy on the total energy quantitatively tests predictions of the finite-temperature thermodynamics.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVLETT.98.080402},
journal = {Physical Review Letters},
number = 8,
volume = 98,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Feb 23 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Fri Feb 23 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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