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Title: Highly absorbing gadolinium test device to characterize the performance of neutron imaging detector systems

Abstract

We report on the fabrication and application of a novel neutron imaging test device made of gadolinium. It is designed for a real time evaluation of the spatial resolution, resolution direction, and distortions of a neutron imaging detector system. Measurements of the spatial resolution of {sup 6}LiF doped ZnS scintillator screens with different thicknesses and of imaging plates were performed. The obtained results are in good agreement with comparison measurements using the standard knife edge detection method.

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20953447
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Review of Scientific Instruments; Journal Volume: 78; Journal Issue: 5; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2736892; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; DETECTION; DOPED MATERIALS; EQUIPMENT; FABRICATION; GADOLINIUM; NEUTRON RADIOGRAPHY; NEUTRONS; PERFORMANCE; PLATES; SOLID SCINTILLATION DETECTORS; SPATIAL RESOLUTION; THICKNESS; ZINC SULFIDES

Citation Formats

Gruenzweig, C., Frei, G., Lehmann, E., Kuehne, G., and David, C. Highly absorbing gadolinium test device to characterize the performance of neutron imaging detector systems. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2736892.
Gruenzweig, C., Frei, G., Lehmann, E., Kuehne, G., & David, C. Highly absorbing gadolinium test device to characterize the performance of neutron imaging detector systems. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2736892.
Gruenzweig, C., Frei, G., Lehmann, E., Kuehne, G., and David, C. Tue . "Highly absorbing gadolinium test device to characterize the performance of neutron imaging detector systems". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2736892.
@article{osti_20953447,
title = {Highly absorbing gadolinium test device to characterize the performance of neutron imaging detector systems},
author = {Gruenzweig, C. and Frei, G. and Lehmann, E. and Kuehne, G. and David, C.},
abstractNote = {We report on the fabrication and application of a novel neutron imaging test device made of gadolinium. It is designed for a real time evaluation of the spatial resolution, resolution direction, and distortions of a neutron imaging detector system. Measurements of the spatial resolution of {sup 6}LiF doped ZnS scintillator screens with different thicknesses and of imaging plates were performed. The obtained results are in good agreement with comparison measurements using the standard knife edge detection method.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2736892},
journal = {Review of Scientific Instruments},
number = 5,
volume = 78,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Tue May 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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