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Title: Variable-temperature independently driven four-tip scanning tunneling microscope

Abstract

The authors have developed an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) variable-temperature four-tip scanning tunneling microscope (STM), operating from room temperature down to 7 K, combined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Four STM tips are mechanically and electrically independent and capable of positioning in arbitrary configurations in nanometer precision. An integrated controller system for both of the multitip STM and SEM with a single computer has also been developed, which enables the four tips to operate either for STM imaging independently and for four-point probe (4PP) conductivity measurements cooperatively. Atomic-resolution STM images of graphite were obtained simultaneously by the four tips. Conductivity measurements by 4PP method were also performed at various temperatures with the four tips in square arrangement with direct contact to the sample surface.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [2]
  1. Department of Physics, School of Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)
  2. (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20953446
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Review of Scientific Instruments; Journal Volume: 78; Journal Issue: 5; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2735593; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; ACCURACY; COMPUTERS; CONFIGURATION; ELECTRIC CONDUCTIVITY; GRAPHITE; IMAGES; POSITIONING; PROBES; RESOLUTION; SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; SCANNING TUNNELING MICROSCOPY; SURFACES; TEMPERATURE RANGE 0000-0013 K; TEMPERATURE RANGE 0013-0065 K; TEMPERATURE RANGE 0065-0273 K; TEMPERATURE RANGE 0273-0400 K

Citation Formats

Hobara, Rei, Nagamura, Naoka, Hasegawa, Shuji, Matsuda, Iwao, Yamamoto, Yuko, Miyatake, Yutaka, Nagamura, Toshihiko, Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-ha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581, and UNISOKU Co., Ltd., 2-4-3, Kasugano, Hirakata, Osaka 573-0131. Variable-temperature independently driven four-tip scanning tunneling microscope. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2735593.
Hobara, Rei, Nagamura, Naoka, Hasegawa, Shuji, Matsuda, Iwao, Yamamoto, Yuko, Miyatake, Yutaka, Nagamura, Toshihiko, Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-ha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581, & UNISOKU Co., Ltd., 2-4-3, Kasugano, Hirakata, Osaka 573-0131. Variable-temperature independently driven four-tip scanning tunneling microscope. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2735593.
Hobara, Rei, Nagamura, Naoka, Hasegawa, Shuji, Matsuda, Iwao, Yamamoto, Yuko, Miyatake, Yutaka, Nagamura, Toshihiko, Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-ha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581, and UNISOKU Co., Ltd., 2-4-3, Kasugano, Hirakata, Osaka 573-0131. Tue . "Variable-temperature independently driven four-tip scanning tunneling microscope". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2735593.
@article{osti_20953446,
title = {Variable-temperature independently driven four-tip scanning tunneling microscope},
author = {Hobara, Rei and Nagamura, Naoka and Hasegawa, Shuji and Matsuda, Iwao and Yamamoto, Yuko and Miyatake, Yutaka and Nagamura, Toshihiko and Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-ha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 and UNISOKU Co., Ltd., 2-4-3, Kasugano, Hirakata, Osaka 573-0131},
abstractNote = {The authors have developed an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) variable-temperature four-tip scanning tunneling microscope (STM), operating from room temperature down to 7 K, combined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Four STM tips are mechanically and electrically independent and capable of positioning in arbitrary configurations in nanometer precision. An integrated controller system for both of the multitip STM and SEM with a single computer has also been developed, which enables the four tips to operate either for STM imaging independently and for four-point probe (4PP) conductivity measurements cooperatively. Atomic-resolution STM images of graphite were obtained simultaneously by the four tips. Conductivity measurements by 4PP method were also performed at various temperatures with the four tips in square arrangement with direct contact to the sample surface.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2735593},
journal = {Review of Scientific Instruments},
number = 5,
volume = 78,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Tue May 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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