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Title: 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane as insulating coating and surface for protein immobilization for piezoelectric microcantilever sensors

Abstract

We have examined coating (PbMg{sub 1/3}Nb{sub 2/3}O{sub 3}){sub 0.63}-(PbTiO{sub 3}){sub 0.37} (PMN-PT)/tin and lead zirconate titanate (PZT)/glass piezoelectric microcantilever sensor (PEMS) with 3-mercaptopropyl-trimethoxysilane (MPS) by a simple solution method to electrically insulate the PEMS for in-water applications. In contrast to earlier methytrimethoxysilane insulation coating, the MPS coating also facilitated receptor immobilization on the sensor surface via bonding of its sulhydryl group to a bifunctional linker, sulfosuccinimidyl-4-(N-maleimidomethyl)cyclohexane-1-carboxylate. We showed that a MPS coating of 21 nm in thickness is sufficient to electrically insulate and provide immobilization surface to the PEMS for in-liquid electrical self-excitation and self-sensing. The in-phosphate buffered saline solution resonance spectra were stable with Q values ranging from 41 to 55. The mass detection sensitivities were determined to be 5x10{sup -11} and 8x10{sup -12} g/Hz for the MPS-insulated PZT-glass and PMN-PT/tin PEMSs, respectively.

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2];  [2]
  1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)
  2. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20953435
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Review of Scientific Instruments; Journal Volume: 78; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2727466; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; CYCLOHEXANE; DETECTION; EQUIPMENT; GLASS; LIQUIDS; PHOSPHATES; PIEZOELECTRICITY; PZT; RECEPTORS; RESONANCE; SENSITIVITY; SENSORS; SPECTRA; SURFACES; THICKNESS; WATER

Citation Formats

Capobianco, Joseph A., Shih, Wan Y., Shih, W.-H., School of Biomedical Engineering, Science, and Health Systems, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104. 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane as insulating coating and surface for protein immobilization for piezoelectric microcantilever sensors. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2727466.
Capobianco, Joseph A., Shih, Wan Y., Shih, W.-H., School of Biomedical Engineering, Science, and Health Systems, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, & Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104. 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane as insulating coating and surface for protein immobilization for piezoelectric microcantilever sensors. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2727466.
Capobianco, Joseph A., Shih, Wan Y., Shih, W.-H., School of Biomedical Engineering, Science, and Health Systems, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104. Sun . "3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane as insulating coating and surface for protein immobilization for piezoelectric microcantilever sensors". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2727466.
@article{osti_20953435,
title = {3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane as insulating coating and surface for protein immobilization for piezoelectric microcantilever sensors},
author = {Capobianco, Joseph A. and Shih, Wan Y. and Shih, W.-H. and School of Biomedical Engineering, Science, and Health Systems, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104},
abstractNote = {We have examined coating (PbMg{sub 1/3}Nb{sub 2/3}O{sub 3}){sub 0.63}-(PbTiO{sub 3}){sub 0.37} (PMN-PT)/tin and lead zirconate titanate (PZT)/glass piezoelectric microcantilever sensor (PEMS) with 3-mercaptopropyl-trimethoxysilane (MPS) by a simple solution method to electrically insulate the PEMS for in-water applications. In contrast to earlier methytrimethoxysilane insulation coating, the MPS coating also facilitated receptor immobilization on the sensor surface via bonding of its sulhydryl group to a bifunctional linker, sulfosuccinimidyl-4-(N-maleimidomethyl)cyclohexane-1-carboxylate. We showed that a MPS coating of 21 nm in thickness is sufficient to electrically insulate and provide immobilization surface to the PEMS for in-liquid electrical self-excitation and self-sensing. The in-phosphate buffered saline solution resonance spectra were stable with Q values ranging from 41 to 55. The mass detection sensitivities were determined to be 5x10{sup -11} and 8x10{sup -12} g/Hz for the MPS-insulated PZT-glass and PMN-PT/tin PEMSs, respectively.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2727466},
journal = {Review of Scientific Instruments},
number = 4,
volume = 78,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Sun Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
  • The interaction between a vapor and a thin film adsorbed on one side of a bimaterial microcantilever produces differential stress, resulting in readily measurable curvatures of the cantilever structure. Depending upon the system studied, there exist two types of gas{endash}solid interaction: bulk-like absorption and surface-like adsorption. The absorption of hydrogen into palladium results in film expansion whose magnitude is governed by hydrogen partial pressure. The bending of a bimaterial microcantilever (palladium/silicon) due to hydrogen absorption depends on the thickness of the palladium film and is reversible but rate limited by a surface barrier. In contrast, the stress induced by adsorptionmore » of mercury onto a bimaterial (gold/silicon) cantilever is irreversible at room temperature, is rate limited by surface coverage, and is independent of the gold{endash}film thickness. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.« less
  • No abstract prepared.
  • No abstract prepared.
  • A closed form semi-empirical model has been developed to understand the physical origins of thermal drift in piezoresistive microcantilever sensors. The two-component model describes both the effects of temperature-related bending and heat dissipation on the piezoresistance. The temperature-related bending component is based on the Euler-Bernoulli theory of elastic deformation applied to a multilayer cantilever. The heat dissipation component is based on energy conservation per unit time for a piezoresistive cantilever in a Wheatstone bridge circuit, representing a balance between electrical power input and heat dissipation into the environment. Conduction and convection are found to be the primary mechanisms of heatmore » transfer, and the dependence of these effects on the thermal conductivity, temperature, and flow rate of the gaseous environment is described. The thermal boundary layer value which defines the length scale of the heat dissipation phenomenon is treated as an empirical fitting parameter. Using the model, it is found that the cantilever heat dissipation is unaffected by the presence of a thin polymer coating, therefore the residual thermal drift in the differential response of a coated and uncoated cantilever is the result of non-identical temperature-related bending. Differential response data shows that residual drift is eliminated under isothermal laboratory conditions but not the unregulated and variable conditions that exist in the outdoor environment (i.e., the field). The two-component model is then validated by simulating the thermal drifts of an uncoated and a coated piezoresistive cantilever under field conditions over a 24 hour period using only meteorological data as input.« less
  • Embedded piezoresistive microcantilever (EPM) sensors may be constructed for a variety of sensing applications. In each application, a custom sensing material is designed that will respond volumetrically to the desired analyte. Here, we have constructed EPM sensors for the detection of chlorine gas (Cl2). The sensing materials used consisted of polymer matrices combined with sodium iodide crystals. Sensors constructed from a silicone-based matrix exhibited the greatest response to Cl2, with detection limits in an outdoor exposure setting of approximately 20 parts per million.