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Title: Diagnostic system to measure spatial and temporal profiles of shock front using compact two-stage light-gas gun and line reflection method

Abstract

A diagnostic system has been developed to obtain spatial and temporal profiles of shock front. A two-stage light-gas gun is used to accelerate impactors in velocity range with 4-9 km/s. The system consists of the Faraday-type electromagnetic sensors to measure impactor velocity, optical system with high-speed streak camera to measure shock-wave velocities, and the delay trigger system with self-adjustable pre-event pulse generator. We describe the specifications and performance of this system and data-analysis technique on the tilt and distortion of the shock front. Finally, we obtained the Hugoniot data of copper for system demonstration.

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Materials and Structures Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori, Yokohama, 226-8503 (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20953431
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Review of Scientific Instruments; Journal Volume: 78; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2723751; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; COPPER; DATA ANALYSIS; OPTICAL SYSTEMS; PERFORMANCE; PULSE GENERATORS; SENSORS; SHOCK WAVES; SPECIFICATIONS; STREAK CAMERAS; VELOCITY

Citation Formats

Yokoo, Manabu, Kawai, Nobuaki, Hironaka, Yoichiro, Nakamura, Kazutaka G., and Kondo, Ken-ichi. Diagnostic system to measure spatial and temporal profiles of shock front using compact two-stage light-gas gun and line reflection method. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2723751.
Yokoo, Manabu, Kawai, Nobuaki, Hironaka, Yoichiro, Nakamura, Kazutaka G., & Kondo, Ken-ichi. Diagnostic system to measure spatial and temporal profiles of shock front using compact two-stage light-gas gun and line reflection method. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2723751.
Yokoo, Manabu, Kawai, Nobuaki, Hironaka, Yoichiro, Nakamura, Kazutaka G., and Kondo, Ken-ichi. Sun . "Diagnostic system to measure spatial and temporal profiles of shock front using compact two-stage light-gas gun and line reflection method". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2723751.
@article{osti_20953431,
title = {Diagnostic system to measure spatial and temporal profiles of shock front using compact two-stage light-gas gun and line reflection method},
author = {Yokoo, Manabu and Kawai, Nobuaki and Hironaka, Yoichiro and Nakamura, Kazutaka G. and Kondo, Ken-ichi},
abstractNote = {A diagnostic system has been developed to obtain spatial and temporal profiles of shock front. A two-stage light-gas gun is used to accelerate impactors in velocity range with 4-9 km/s. The system consists of the Faraday-type electromagnetic sensors to measure impactor velocity, optical system with high-speed streak camera to measure shock-wave velocities, and the delay trigger system with self-adjustable pre-event pulse generator. We describe the specifications and performance of this system and data-analysis technique on the tilt and distortion of the shock front. Finally, we obtained the Hugoniot data of copper for system demonstration.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2723751},
journal = {Review of Scientific Instruments},
number = 4,
volume = 78,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Sun Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
  • A two-stage light-gas gun is used for a variety of dynamic physical-property measurements at 100 GPa (1 Mbar) pressures. The diagnostic system described here consists of a flash x-ray system to measure impactor velocity, detectors and electronics to measure shock-wave velocities with subnanosecond resolution, and data--analysis techniques that permit us to measure the tilt and distortion of the impactor and of the resulting shock front. We describe our methods for safely purging hydrogen gas from the system after each shot.
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