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Title: Calibration of atomic force microscope cantilevers using piezolevers

Abstract

The atomic force microscope (AFM) can provide qualitative information by numerous imaging modes, but it can also provide quantitative information when calibrated cantilevers are used. In this article a new technique is demonstrated to calibrate AFM cantilevers using a reference piezolever. Experiments are performed on 13 different commercially available cantilevers. The stiff cantilevers, whose stiffness is more than 0.4 N/m, are compared to the stiffness values measured using nanoindentation. The experimental data collected by the piezolever method is in good agreement with the nanoindentation data. Calibration with a piezolever is fast, easy, and nondestructive and a commercially available AFM is enough to perform the experiments. In addition, the AFM laser must not be calibrated. Calibration is reported here for cantilevers whose stiffness lies between 0.08 and 6.02 N/m.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Department of Engineering Mechanics, W317.4 Nebraska Hall, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588-0526 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20953426
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Review of Scientific Instruments; Journal Volume: 78; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2719649; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY; CALIBRATION; FLEXIBILITY; LASERS; NONDESTRUCTIVE ANALYSIS

Citation Formats

Aksu, Saltuk B., and Turner, Joseph A. Calibration of atomic force microscope cantilevers using piezolevers. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2719649.
Aksu, Saltuk B., & Turner, Joseph A. Calibration of atomic force microscope cantilevers using piezolevers. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2719649.
Aksu, Saltuk B., and Turner, Joseph A. Sun . "Calibration of atomic force microscope cantilevers using piezolevers". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2719649.
@article{osti_20953426,
title = {Calibration of atomic force microscope cantilevers using piezolevers},
author = {Aksu, Saltuk B. and Turner, Joseph A.},
abstractNote = {The atomic force microscope (AFM) can provide qualitative information by numerous imaging modes, but it can also provide quantitative information when calibrated cantilevers are used. In this article a new technique is demonstrated to calibrate AFM cantilevers using a reference piezolever. Experiments are performed on 13 different commercially available cantilevers. The stiff cantilevers, whose stiffness is more than 0.4 N/m, are compared to the stiffness values measured using nanoindentation. The experimental data collected by the piezolever method is in good agreement with the nanoindentation data. Calibration with a piezolever is fast, easy, and nondestructive and a commercially available AFM is enough to perform the experiments. In addition, the AFM laser must not be calibrated. Calibration is reported here for cantilevers whose stiffness lies between 0.08 and 6.02 N/m.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2719649},
journal = {Review of Scientific Instruments},
number = 4,
volume = 78,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Sun Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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