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Title: Localized etching of an insulator film coated on a copper wire using an atmospheric-pressure microplasma jet

Abstract

Atmospheric-pressure microplasma jets (AP{mu}PJs) of Ar and Ar/O{sub 2} gases were generated from the tip of a stainless steel surgical needle having outer and inner diameters of 0.4 and 0.2 mm, respectively, with a rf excitation of 13.56 MHz. The steel needle functions both as a powered electrode and a gas nozzle. The operating power is 1.2-6 W and the corresponding peak-to-peak voltage Vp.p. is about 1.5 kV. The AP{mu}PJ was applied to the localized etching of a polyamide-imide insulator film (thickness of 10 {mu}m) of a copper winding wire of 90 {mu}m diameter. The insulator film around the copper wire was completely removed by the irradiated plasma from a certain direction without fusing the wire. The removal time under the Ar AP{mu}PJ irradiation was only 3 s at a rf power of 4 W. Fluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscope images reveal that good selectivity of the insulator film to the copper wire was achieved. In the case of Ar/O{sub 2} AP{mu}PJ irradiation with an O{sub 2} concentration of 10% or more, the removed copper surface was converted to copper monoxide CuO.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Tsuruoka National College of Technology, Inooka-Sawada 104, Tsuruoka, Yamagata 997-8511 (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20953423
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Review of Scientific Instruments; Journal Volume: 78; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2727488; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE; COPPER; COPPER OXIDES; ETCHING; FLUORESCENCE; GASES; IRRADIATION; OPTICAL MICROSCOPY; PEAKS; PLASMA; POLYAMIDES; SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; STAINLESS STEELS; THIN FILMS; WIRES

Citation Formats

Yoshiki, Hiroyuki. Localized etching of an insulator film coated on a copper wire using an atmospheric-pressure microplasma jet. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2727488.
Yoshiki, Hiroyuki. Localized etching of an insulator film coated on a copper wire using an atmospheric-pressure microplasma jet. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2727488.
Yoshiki, Hiroyuki. Sun . "Localized etching of an insulator film coated on a copper wire using an atmospheric-pressure microplasma jet". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2727488.
@article{osti_20953423,
title = {Localized etching of an insulator film coated on a copper wire using an atmospheric-pressure microplasma jet},
author = {Yoshiki, Hiroyuki},
abstractNote = {Atmospheric-pressure microplasma jets (AP{mu}PJs) of Ar and Ar/O{sub 2} gases were generated from the tip of a stainless steel surgical needle having outer and inner diameters of 0.4 and 0.2 mm, respectively, with a rf excitation of 13.56 MHz. The steel needle functions both as a powered electrode and a gas nozzle. The operating power is 1.2-6 W and the corresponding peak-to-peak voltage Vp.p. is about 1.5 kV. The AP{mu}PJ was applied to the localized etching of a polyamide-imide insulator film (thickness of 10 {mu}m) of a copper winding wire of 90 {mu}m diameter. The insulator film around the copper wire was completely removed by the irradiated plasma from a certain direction without fusing the wire. The removal time under the Ar AP{mu}PJ irradiation was only 3 s at a rf power of 4 W. Fluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscope images reveal that good selectivity of the insulator film to the copper wire was achieved. In the case of Ar/O{sub 2} AP{mu}PJ irradiation with an O{sub 2} concentration of 10% or more, the removed copper surface was converted to copper monoxide CuO.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2727488},
journal = {Review of Scientific Instruments},
number = 4,
volume = 78,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Sun Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
  • Bacterial inactivation experiment was performed using atmospheric pressure microplasma jets driven by radio-frequency wave of 13.56 MHz and by low frequency wave of several kilohertz. With addition of a ground ring electrode, the discharge current, the optical emission intensities from reactive radicals, and the sterilization efficiency were enhanced significantly. When oxygen gas was added to helium at the flow rate of 5 SCCM, the sterilization efficiency was enhanced. From the survival curve of Escherichia coli, the primary role in the inactivation was played by reactive species with minor aid from heat, UV photons, charged particles, and electric fields.
  • An atmospheric pressure microplasma jet was employed as a deposition tool to fabricate silicon oxycarbide films from tetraethoxysilane-argon (Ar) mixture gas at room temperature. Resultant films exhibit intense visible emission under a 325 nm excitation which appears white to naked eyes in the range from {approx}1.75 to {approx}3.5 eV at room temperature. The origin of photoluminescence is attributed to the electron-hole pair recombination through neutral oxygen vacancies (NOVs) in the film. The density of NOV defects was found in the range from 3.48x10{sup 15} to 2.23x10{sup 16} cm{sup -3}. The photoluminescence quantum efficiencies were estimated to be 1.48%-4.15%. Present experimentmore » results demonstrate that the silicon oxycarbide films prepared by using atmospheric pressure microplasma jet would be a competitive candidate for the development of white light emission devices.« less
  • Organic and inorganic silicon dioxide films have been deposited by means of an atmospheric pressure microplasma jet. Tetramethylsilane (TMS), oxygen, and hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) are injected into argon as plasma forming gases. In the case of TMS injection, inorganic films are deposited if an admixture of oxygen is used. In the case of HMDSO injection, inorganic films can be deposited at room temperature even without any oxygen admixture: at low HMDSO flow rates [<0.1 SCCM (SCCM denotes cubic centimeters per minute at STP),<32 ppm], the SiO{sub x}H{sub z} films contain no carbon and exhibit oxygen-to-silicon ratio close to 2 according tomore » x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. At high HMDSO flow rates (>0.1 SCCM,>32 ppm), SiO{sub x}C{sub y}H{sub z} with up to 21% of carbon are obtained. The transition from organic to inorganic film is confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The deposition of inorganic SiO{sub 2} films from HMDSO without any oxygen admixture is explained by an ion-induced polymerization scheme of HMDSO.« less
  • A nitrogen microplasma jet operated at atmospheric pressure was developed for treating thermally sensitive materials. For example, the plasma sources in treatment of vulnerable biological materials must operate near the room temperature at the atmospheric pressure, without any risk of arcing or electrical shock. The microplasma jet device operated by an electrical power less than 10 W exhibited a long plasma jet of about 6.5 cm with temperature near 300 K, not causing any harm to human skin. Optical emission measured at the wide range of 280-800 nm indicated various reactive species produced by the plasma jet.
  • An atmospheric pressure microplasma jet is developed for depositing homogeneous thin films from C{sub 2}H{sub 2}. The adjustment of the gas flow through the microplasma jet assures optimal flow conditions as well as minimizes deposition inside the jet. In addition, the formation of an argon boundary layer surrounding the emerging plasma beam separates the ambient atmosphere from the flow of growth precursor. Thereby the incorporation of nitrogen and oxygen from the ambient atmosphere into the deposited film is suppressed. Soft polymerlike hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films are deposited at the rate of a few nm/s on the area of amore » few square millimeters.« less