skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Online system for temperature and accumulated dose control in plasma-based ion implantation

Abstract

Surface treatment optimization requires the control of the ion dose and the workpiece temperature, two parameters that are not trivially measurable in plasma-based ion implantation. A temperature and ion fluence monitoring system has been developed and implemented in a plasma-based ion implanter. It is based on the measurement with a thermopile of the radiation emitted from the back face of a thin copper disk inserted in the stainless steel sample holder. Since the incident ions carry practically all the incident power, the measurement of the Cu disk temperature that increases during implantation can provide an evaluation of the ion fluence in real time. A model has been developed for the deconvolution of the temperature data and has been fitted to the temperature behavior during implantation. A good agreement between the total integrated doses, evaluated with Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy characterization, and the ion fluence calculated by means of this model has been obtained with a discrepancy less than 16%.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [2]
  1. INRS-Energie, Materiaux et Telecommunications, Universite du Quebec, 1650 Boulevard Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada)
  2. (Canada)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20953260
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Review of Scientific Instruments; Journal Volume: 78; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2472601; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; CONTROL; COPPER; DOSES; ION IMPLANTATION; IONS; MONITORING; OPTIMIZATION; PLASMA; PROCESSING; RUTHERFORD BACKSCATTERING SPECTROSCOPY; SAMPLE HOLDERS; STAINLESS STEELS; SURFACE TREATMENTS

Citation Formats

Roy, F., Abel, G., Terreault, B., Reguer, A., Meunier, J.-L., Bolduc, M., Ross, G. G., Department of Chemical Engineering, McGill University, 3610 University Street, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2B2, and INRS-Energie, Materiaux et Telecommunications, Universite du Quebec, 1650 Boulevard Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2. Online system for temperature and accumulated dose control in plasma-based ion implantation. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2472601.
Roy, F., Abel, G., Terreault, B., Reguer, A., Meunier, J.-L., Bolduc, M., Ross, G. G., Department of Chemical Engineering, McGill University, 3610 University Street, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2B2, & INRS-Energie, Materiaux et Telecommunications, Universite du Quebec, 1650 Boulevard Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2. Online system for temperature and accumulated dose control in plasma-based ion implantation. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2472601.
Roy, F., Abel, G., Terreault, B., Reguer, A., Meunier, J.-L., Bolduc, M., Ross, G. G., Department of Chemical Engineering, McGill University, 3610 University Street, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2B2, and INRS-Energie, Materiaux et Telecommunications, Universite du Quebec, 1650 Boulevard Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2. Thu . "Online system for temperature and accumulated dose control in plasma-based ion implantation". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2472601.
@article{osti_20953260,
title = {Online system for temperature and accumulated dose control in plasma-based ion implantation},
author = {Roy, F. and Abel, G. and Terreault, B. and Reguer, A. and Meunier, J.-L. and Bolduc, M. and Ross, G. G. and Department of Chemical Engineering, McGill University, 3610 University Street, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2B2 and INRS-Energie, Materiaux et Telecommunications, Universite du Quebec, 1650 Boulevard Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2},
abstractNote = {Surface treatment optimization requires the control of the ion dose and the workpiece temperature, two parameters that are not trivially measurable in plasma-based ion implantation. A temperature and ion fluence monitoring system has been developed and implemented in a plasma-based ion implanter. It is based on the measurement with a thermopile of the radiation emitted from the back face of a thin copper disk inserted in the stainless steel sample holder. Since the incident ions carry practically all the incident power, the measurement of the Cu disk temperature that increases during implantation can provide an evaluation of the ion fluence in real time. A model has been developed for the deconvolution of the temperature data and has been fitted to the temperature behavior during implantation. A good agreement between the total integrated doses, evaluated with Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy characterization, and the ion fluence calculated by means of this model has been obtained with a discrepancy less than 16%.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2472601},
journal = {Review of Scientific Instruments},
number = 2,
volume = 78,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Feb 15 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Feb 15 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
  • Plasma-based ion implantation of a square bar is modeled using a particle-in-cell plasma simulation for three different size bars. When the sheath width is significantly greater than the bar width, it is found that the incident ion dose is largest at the center of the bar and decreases precipitously at the corners. When the sheath width is comparable to the bar width, the incident dose is largest near to, but not at, the corners. It may be possible to optimize dose uniformity by straddling these two regimes. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}
  • Based on the multiple-grid particle-in-cell code, an advanced simulation model is established to study the sheath physics and dose uniformity along the sample stage in order to provide the theoretical basis for further improvement of enhanced glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition. At t=7.0 mus, the expansion of the sheath in the horizontal direction is hindered by the dielectric cage. The electron focusing effect is demonstrated by this model. Most of the ions at the inside wall of the cage are implanted into the edge of the sample stage and a relatively uniform ion fluence distribution with amore » large peak is observed at the end. Compared to the results obtained from the previous model, a higher implant fluence and larger area of uniformity are disclosed.« less
  • Purpose: The use of mega voltage gamma and x-ray sources with their skin sparring qualities in radiation therapy has been a boon in relieving patient discomfort and allowing high tumor doses to be given with fewer restrictions due to radiation effects in the skin. However, high doses given to deep tumors may require careful consideration of dose distribution in the buildup region in order to avoid irreparable damage to the skin. Methods: To measure the perturbation of MOSFET detector in Co60,6MV and 15MV the detector was placed on the surface of the phantom covered with the brass build up cap.more » To measure the effect of temperature the MOSFET detector was kept on the surface of hot water polythene container and the radiation was delivere. In order to measure the sensitivity variation with accumulated dose Measurements were taken by delivering the dose of 200 cGy to MOSFET until the MOSFET absorbed dose comes to 20,000 cGy Results: the Measurement was performed by positioning the bare MOSFET and MOSFET with brass build up cap on the top surface of the solid water phantom for various field sizes in order to find whether there is any attenuation caused in the dose distribution. The response of MOSFET was monitored for temperature ranging from 42 degree C to 22 degree C. The integrated dose dependence of MOSFET dosimeter sensitivity over different energy is not well characterized. This work investigates the dual-bias MOSFET dosimeter sensitivity response to 6 MV and 15 MV beams. Conclusion: From this study it is observed that unlike diode, bare MOSFET does not perturb the radiation field.. It is observed that the build-up influences the temperature dependency of MOSFET and causes some uncertainty in the readings. In the case of sensitivity variation with accumulated dose MOSFET showed higher sensitivity with dose accumulation for both the energies.« less
  • Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) is an effective technique to enhance the surface properties of industrial components possessing an irregular shape. However, it is difficult to achieve uniform implantation along the groove surface of a ball bearing. In this work, the authors focus on the PIII treatment of the arc surface of an industrial ball bearing. Three practical sample placement configurations are investigated: (1) direct placement on the sample stage platen, (2) placement on a copper extension with the same diameter as the bearing race, (3) placement on a copper plate erected on the sample stage by means of amore » small metal rod. Using theoretical simulation, the implant dose uniformity along the groove surface is determined for the three orientations. The results reveal that configuration (3) yields the largest implant dose along the groove surface and the dose uniformity is worse in configuration (1). Hence, in order to improve the lateral dose uniformity along the race surface, the bearing should be elevated from the sample.« less
  • High energy implantation of metal ions can be carried out using conventional ion implantation with a mass-selected ion beam in scanned-spot mode by employing a broad-beam approach such as with a vacuum arc ion source, or by utilizing plasma immersion ion implantation with a metal plasma. For many high dose applications, the use of plasma immersion techniques offers a high-rate process, but the formation of a surface film along with the subsurface implanted layer is sometimes a severe or even fatal detriment. We describe here an operating mode of the metal plasma immersion approach by which pure implantation can bemore » obtained. We have demonstrated the technique by carrying out Ti and Ta implantations at energies of about 80 and 120 keV for Ti and Ta, respectively, and doses on the order of 1{times}10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2}. Our experiments show that virtually pure implantation without simultaneous surface deposition can be accomplished. Using proper synchronization of the metal arc and sample voltage pulse, the applied dose that deposits as a film versus the part that is energetically implanted (the deposition-to-implantation ratio) can be precisely controlled.{copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}« less