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Title: Synchronizing fast electrically driven phenomena with synchrotron x-ray probes

Abstract

Time scales of long-range physical processes in solids are typically in the range of picoseconds to nanoseconds. These times are commensurate with the time resolution of structural probes based on modern synchrotron x-ray sources. Several processes of technological and scientific interest can be driven by applied electric fields, but synchronizing electrically driven phenomena with an x-ray probe poses a technical challenge. We describe the synchronization of a well-defined number of fast electrical pulses with the time structure of synchrotron x rays to probe the dynamics of thin films and nanostructures. This synchronization technique yields x-ray transient signals with 600 ps transitions in ferroelectric thin films, with a contribution of approximately 320 ps due to timing jitter in the synchronization.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)
  2. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20953251
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Review of Scientific Instruments; Journal Volume: 78; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2668989; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; ELECTRIC FIELDS; FERROELECTRIC MATERIALS; MAGNETIZATION; NANOSTRUCTURES; PROBES; PULSES; SIGNALS; SYNCHRONIZATION; SYNCHROTRONS; THIN FILMS; TIME RESOLUTION; X RADIATION; X-RAY DIFFRACTION; X-RAY SOURCES

Citation Formats

Grigoriev, Alexei, Do, D.-H., Evans, Paul G., Adams, Bernhard, Landahl, Eric, Dufresne, Eric M., and Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439. Synchronizing fast electrically driven phenomena with synchrotron x-ray probes. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2668989.
Grigoriev, Alexei, Do, D.-H., Evans, Paul G., Adams, Bernhard, Landahl, Eric, Dufresne, Eric M., & Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439. Synchronizing fast electrically driven phenomena with synchrotron x-ray probes. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2668989.
Grigoriev, Alexei, Do, D.-H., Evans, Paul G., Adams, Bernhard, Landahl, Eric, Dufresne, Eric M., and Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439. Thu . "Synchronizing fast electrically driven phenomena with synchrotron x-ray probes". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2668989.
@article{osti_20953251,
title = {Synchronizing fast electrically driven phenomena with synchrotron x-ray probes},
author = {Grigoriev, Alexei and Do, D.-H. and Evans, Paul G. and Adams, Bernhard and Landahl, Eric and Dufresne, Eric M. and Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439},
abstractNote = {Time scales of long-range physical processes in solids are typically in the range of picoseconds to nanoseconds. These times are commensurate with the time resolution of structural probes based on modern synchrotron x-ray sources. Several processes of technological and scientific interest can be driven by applied electric fields, but synchronizing electrically driven phenomena with an x-ray probe poses a technical challenge. We describe the synchronization of a well-defined number of fast electrical pulses with the time structure of synchrotron x rays to probe the dynamics of thin films and nanostructures. This synchronization technique yields x-ray transient signals with 600 ps transitions in ferroelectric thin films, with a contribution of approximately 320 ps due to timing jitter in the synchronization.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2668989},
journal = {Review of Scientific Instruments},
number = 2,
volume = 78,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Feb 15 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Feb 15 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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