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Title: Initial Evaluation of Treatment-Related Pneumonitis in Advanced-Stage Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated With Concurrent Chemotherapy and Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

Abstract

Purpose: To investigate the rate of high-grade treatment-related pneumonitis (TRP) in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with concurrent chemotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: From August 2002 to August 2005, 151 NSCLC patients were treated with IMRT. We excluded patients who did not receive concurrent chemotherapy or who had early-stage cancers, a history of major lung surgery, prior chest RT, a dose <50 Gy, or IMRT combined with three-dimensional conformal RT (3D-CRT). Toxicities were graded by Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Grade {>=}3 TRP for 68 eligible IMRT patients was compared with TRP among 222 similar patients treated with 3D-CRT. Results: The median follow-up durations for the IMRT and 3D-CRT patients were 8 months (range, 0-27 months) and 9 months (range, 0-56 months), respectively. The median IMRT and 3D-CRT doses were 63 Gy. The median gross tumor volume was 194 mL (range, 21-911 mL) for IMRT, compared with 142 mL (range, 1.5-1,186 mL) for 3D-CRT (p = 0.002). Despite the IMRT group's larger gross tumor volume, the rate of Grade {>=}3 TRP at 12 months was 8% (95% confidence interval 4%-19%), compared with 32% (95% confidence interval 26%-40%) for 3D-CRT (p =more » 0.002). Conclusions: In advanced NSCLC patients treated with chemoradiation, IMRT resulted in significantly lower levels of Grade {>=}3 TRP compared with 3D-CRT. Clinical, dosimetric, and patient selection factors that may have influenced rates of TRP require continuing investigation. A randomized trial comparing IMRT with 3D-CRT has been initiated.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [1];  [3];  [6];  [3];  [1];  [1]
  1. Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)
  2. Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States). E-mail: zliao@mdanderson.org
  3. Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)
  4. Department of Biostatistics and Applied Mathematics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)
  5. Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Cancer Hospital, Shanghai (China)
  6. Department of Radiation Oncology, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20951619
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 68; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.12.031; PII: S0360-3016(06)03637-6; Copyright (c) 2007 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; CARCINOMAS; CHEMOTHERAPY; CHEST; LUNGS; PATIENTS; PNEUMONITIS; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY; SURGERY; TOXICITY

Citation Formats

Yom, Sue S., Liao Zhongxing, Liu, H. Helen, Tucker, Susan L., Hu, C.-S., Wei Xiong, Wang Xuanming, Wang Shulian, Mohan, Radhe, Cox, James D., and Komaki, Ritsuko. Initial Evaluation of Treatment-Related Pneumonitis in Advanced-Stage Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated With Concurrent Chemotherapy and Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.12.031.
Yom, Sue S., Liao Zhongxing, Liu, H. Helen, Tucker, Susan L., Hu, C.-S., Wei Xiong, Wang Xuanming, Wang Shulian, Mohan, Radhe, Cox, James D., & Komaki, Ritsuko. Initial Evaluation of Treatment-Related Pneumonitis in Advanced-Stage Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated With Concurrent Chemotherapy and Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy. United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.12.031.
Yom, Sue S., Liao Zhongxing, Liu, H. Helen, Tucker, Susan L., Hu, C.-S., Wei Xiong, Wang Xuanming, Wang Shulian, Mohan, Radhe, Cox, James D., and Komaki, Ritsuko. Tue . "Initial Evaluation of Treatment-Related Pneumonitis in Advanced-Stage Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated With Concurrent Chemotherapy and Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy". United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.12.031.
@article{osti_20951619,
title = {Initial Evaluation of Treatment-Related Pneumonitis in Advanced-Stage Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated With Concurrent Chemotherapy and Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy},
author = {Yom, Sue S. and Liao Zhongxing and Liu, H. Helen and Tucker, Susan L. and Hu, C.-S. and Wei Xiong and Wang Xuanming and Wang Shulian and Mohan, Radhe and Cox, James D. and Komaki, Ritsuko},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To investigate the rate of high-grade treatment-related pneumonitis (TRP) in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with concurrent chemotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: From August 2002 to August 2005, 151 NSCLC patients were treated with IMRT. We excluded patients who did not receive concurrent chemotherapy or who had early-stage cancers, a history of major lung surgery, prior chest RT, a dose <50 Gy, or IMRT combined with three-dimensional conformal RT (3D-CRT). Toxicities were graded by Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Grade {>=}3 TRP for 68 eligible IMRT patients was compared with TRP among 222 similar patients treated with 3D-CRT. Results: The median follow-up durations for the IMRT and 3D-CRT patients were 8 months (range, 0-27 months) and 9 months (range, 0-56 months), respectively. The median IMRT and 3D-CRT doses were 63 Gy. The median gross tumor volume was 194 mL (range, 21-911 mL) for IMRT, compared with 142 mL (range, 1.5-1,186 mL) for 3D-CRT (p = 0.002). Despite the IMRT group's larger gross tumor volume, the rate of Grade {>=}3 TRP at 12 months was 8% (95% confidence interval 4%-19%), compared with 32% (95% confidence interval 26%-40%) for 3D-CRT (p = 0.002). Conclusions: In advanced NSCLC patients treated with chemoradiation, IMRT resulted in significantly lower levels of Grade {>=}3 TRP compared with 3D-CRT. Clinical, dosimetric, and patient selection factors that may have influenced rates of TRP require continuing investigation. A randomized trial comparing IMRT with 3D-CRT has been initiated.},
doi = {10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.12.031},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 1,
volume = 68,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Tue May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
  • Purpose: To investigate factors associated with treatment-related pneumonitis in non-small-cell lung cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed data from 223 patients treated with definitive concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Treatment-related pneumonitis was graded according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify predictive factors. Results: Median follow-up was 10.5 months (range, 1.4-58 months). The actuarial incidence of Grade {>=}3 pneumonitis was 22% at 6 months and 32% at 1 year. By univariate analyses, lung volume, gross tumor volume, mean lung dose, and relative V5 through V65, in incrementsmore » of 5 Gy, were all found to be significantly associated with treatment-related pneumonitis. The mean lung dose and rV5-rV65 were highly correlated (p < 0.0001). By multivariate analysis, relative V5 was the most significant factor associated with treatment-related pneumonitis; the 1-year actuarial incidences of Grade {>=}3 pneumonitis in the group with V5 {<=}42% and V5 >42% were 3% and 38%, respectively (p = 0.001). Conclusions: In this study, a number of clinical and dosimetric factors were found to be significantly associated with treatment-related pneumonitis. However, rV5 was the only significant factor associated with this toxicity. Until it is better understood which dose range is most relevant, multiple clinical and dosimetric factors should be considered in treatment planning for non-small-cell lung cancer patients receiving concurrent chemoradiotherapy.« less
  • Purpose: Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) 30105 tested two different concurrent chemoradiotherapy platforms with high-dose (74 Gy) three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) after two cycles of induction chemotherapy for Stage IIIA/IIIB non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients to determine if either could achieve a primary endpoint of >18-month median survival. Final results of 30105 demonstrated that induction carboplatin and gemcitabine and concurrent gemcitabine 3D-CRT was not feasible because of treatment-related toxicity. However, induction and concurrent carboplatin/paclitaxel with 74 Gy 3D-CRT had a median survival of 24 months, and is the basis for the experimental arm in CALGB 30610/RTOG 0617/N0628. Wemore » conducted a secondary analysis of all patients to determine predictors of treatment-related pulmonary toxicity. Methods and Materials: Patient, tumor, and treatment-related variables were analyzed to determine their relation with treatment-related pulmonary toxicity. Results: Older age, higher N stage, larger planning target volume (PTV)1, smaller total lung volume/PTV1 ratio, larger V20, and larger mean lung dose were associated with increasing pulmonary toxicity on univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis confirmed that V20 and nodal stage as well as treatment with concurrent gemcitabine were associated with treatment-related toxicity. A high-risk group comprising patients with N3 disease and V20 >38% was associated with 80% of Grades 3-5 pulmonary toxicity cases. Conclusions: Elevated V20 and N3 disease status are important predictors of treatment related pulmonary toxicity in patients treated with high-dose 3D-CRT and concurrent chemotherapy. Further studies may use these metrics in considering patients for these treatments.« less
  • Purpose: To assess clinical outcomes and complications in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with helical tomotherapy (HT) with or without chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: Data from 37 NSCLC patients treated between January 2007 and August 2008 were analyzed retrospectively. Twenty-eight patients had Stage III disease. Concurrent and neoadjuvant chemotherapy was given to 24 and 14 patients, respectively. Radiotherapy was delivered to a total dose of 60-70.4 Gy at 2.0-2.4 Gy per fraction to the gross tumor volume and 50-64 Gy at 1.8-2.0 Gy per fraction to the planning target volume. Results: With a median follow-up of 18 monthsmore » (range, 6-27 months), 2-year local control and overall survival rates were 63% and 56% for all 37 patients, respectively, and were 78% and 75% for the patients with Stage III disease who received concurrent chemoradiotherapy alone. Acute esophagitis and treatment-related pneumonitis (TRP) {>=}Grade 3 occurred in 5 and 7 patients, respectively. Four patients died of treatment-related death (TRD) after HT. In univariate analysis, poor performance status, total lung V{sub 5}, contralateral lung (CL) V{sub 5}, and V{sub 10} were associated with TRD. Only CL V{sub 5} remained significant in the multivariate analysis (p = 0.029). Conclusions: HT with chemotherapy has shown promising clinical outcomes, esophagitis, and TRPs. However, HT has produced a somewhat high rate of fatal pulmonary complications. Our data suggest that CL V{sub 5} should be considered and kept as low as possible (<60%) in addition to the conventional dosimetric factors.« less
  • Purpose: To retrospectively compare outcomes for patients with unresectable locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated at our institution with concurrent chemoradiation with or without induction chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed 265 consecutive patients who received definitive treatment with three-dimensional conformal radiation and concurrent chemotherapy. Of these, 127 patients received induction chemotherapy before concurrent chemoradiation. Results: The two groups of patients (with induction vs. without induction chemotherapy) were similar in age, performance status, weight loss, histology, grade, and stage. Patients who received induction chemotherapy had better overall survival (median, 1.9 vs. 1.4 years; 5-year rate, 25% vs. 12%;more » p < 0.001) and distant metastasis-free survival (5-year rate, 42% vs. 23%; p = 0.021). Locoregional control was not significantly different between the two groups. Multivariate analysis showed that induction chemotherapy was the most significant factor affecting overall survival, with a hazard ratio of 0.55 (95% confidence interval 0.40-0.75; p < 0.001). A planned subgroup analysis showed that induction chemotherapy was associated with a significant overall survival benefit for patients with adenocarcinoma or large-cell carcinoma (5-year rate, 24% vs. 8%; p = 0.003) but not for those with squamous cell carcinoma. A multivariate analysis of patients with adenocarcinoma or large-cell carcinoma confirmed that induction chemotherapy was the most significant factor associated with better overall survival, with a hazard ratio of 0.47 (95% confidence interval, 0.28-0.78; p = 0.003). Conclusion: Our retrospective analysis suggests that in combination with concurrent chemoradiation, induction chemotherapy may provide a small but significant survival benefit for patients with unresectable locally advanced adenocarcinoma or large-cell carcinoma of the lung.« less
  • Purpose: To determine the risk factors for acute esophagitis (AE) in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with concurrent chemotherapy (CCT) and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Methods and Materials: Clinical data were retrospectively analyzed for 215 NSCLC patients treated with CCT and 3D-CRT during 2000-2003, 127 of whom also had induction chemotherapy (ICT). Carboplatin and paclitaxel were the most commonly used agents for both ICT and CCT. The median prescription dose of radiotherapy was 63.5 Gy in 35 fractions. AE was graded during each treatment week and 1-month follow-up visits. The factors related to clinical and disease characteristics, CCT andmore » 3D-CRT treatments, and treatment planning were reviewed and analyzed for their association with Grade {>=}3 AE using univariate and multivariate logistic tests. Results: The rate of any grade AE was 93.0% and of Grade {>=}3 was 20.5%. Univariate analyses showed that none of the clinical factors was significantly associated with Grade {>=}3 AE. However, the mean radiation dose to the esophagus, the absolute esophageal volume treated above 15 Gy (aV15) through aV45 Gy, and the relative esophagus volume treated above 10 Gy (rV10) through rV45 Gy were significant risk factors for Grade {>=}3 AE. Only rV20 was retained as the single risk factor in multivariate analyses. Conclusions: The risk of AE in the NSCLC patients treated with CCT and 3D-CRT was primarily determined by dosimetric factors. These factors should be carefully considered during treatment planning to minimize the incidence of AE.« less