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Title: Androgen Deprivation Therapy Does Not Impact Cause-Specific or Overall Survival in High-Risk Prostate Cancer Managed With Brachytherapy and Supplemental External Beam

Abstract

Purpose: To determine cause-specific survival (CSS), biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS), and overall survival (OS) in high-risk prostate cancer patients undergoing brachytherapy with or without supplemental therapies. Methods and Materials: Between April 1995 and July 2002, 204 patients with high-risk prostate cancer (Gleason score {>=}8 or prostate-specific antigen [PSA] >20 ng/mL or clinical stage {>=}T2c) underwent brachytherapy. Median follow-up was 7.0 years. The bPFS was defined by a PSA {<=}0.40 ng/mL after nadir. Multiple clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters were evaluated for the impact on survival. Results: The 10-year CSS, bPFS, and OS were 88.9%, 86.6%, and 68.6%, respectively. A statistically significant difference in bPFS was discerned between hormone naive, ADT {<=}6 months, and ADT >6 month cohorts (79.7% vs. 95.% vs. 89.9%, p = 0.032). Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) did not impact CSS or OS. For bPFS patients, the median posttreatment PSA was <0.04 ng/mL. A Cox linear regression analysis demonstrated that Gleason score was the best predictor of CSS, whereas percent positive biopsies and duration of ADT best predicted for bPFS. The OS was best predicted by Gleason score and diabetes. Thirty-eight patients have died, with 26 of the deaths from cardiovascular/pulmonary disease or second malignancy. Eleven patients havemore » died of metastatic prostate cancer. Conclusions: The ADT improved 10-year bPFS without statistical impact on CSS or OS. Death as a result of cardiovascular/pulmonary disease and second malignancies were more than twice as common as prostate cancer deaths. Strategies to improve cardiovascular health should positively impact OS.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [2];  [4];  [2];  [5];  [2]
  1. Schiffler Cancer Center and Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States). E-mail: gmerrick@urologicresearchinstitute.org
  2. Schiffler Cancer Center and Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States)
  3. Puget Sound Healthcare Corporation, Group Health Cooperative, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)
  4. (United States)
  5. Department of Pathology, Wheeling Hospital, Wheeling, WV (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20951612
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 68; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.11.046; PII: S0360-3016(06)03606-6; Copyright (c) 2007 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ANDROGENS; ANTIGENS; BEAMS; BIOPSY; BRACHYTHERAPY; CARCINOMAS; DEATH; HEALTH HAZARDS; METASTASES; PATIENTS; PROSTATE; REGRESSION ANALYSIS

Citation Formats

Merrick, Gregory S., Butler, Wayne M., Wallner, Kent E., Galbreath, Robert W., Ohio University Eastern, St. Clairsville, OH, Allen, Zachariah A., Adamovich, Edward, and Lief, Jonathan. Androgen Deprivation Therapy Does Not Impact Cause-Specific or Overall Survival in High-Risk Prostate Cancer Managed With Brachytherapy and Supplemental External Beam. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.11.046.
Merrick, Gregory S., Butler, Wayne M., Wallner, Kent E., Galbreath, Robert W., Ohio University Eastern, St. Clairsville, OH, Allen, Zachariah A., Adamovich, Edward, & Lief, Jonathan. Androgen Deprivation Therapy Does Not Impact Cause-Specific or Overall Survival in High-Risk Prostate Cancer Managed With Brachytherapy and Supplemental External Beam. United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.11.046.
Merrick, Gregory S., Butler, Wayne M., Wallner, Kent E., Galbreath, Robert W., Ohio University Eastern, St. Clairsville, OH, Allen, Zachariah A., Adamovich, Edward, and Lief, Jonathan. Tue . "Androgen Deprivation Therapy Does Not Impact Cause-Specific or Overall Survival in High-Risk Prostate Cancer Managed With Brachytherapy and Supplemental External Beam". United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.11.046.
@article{osti_20951612,
title = {Androgen Deprivation Therapy Does Not Impact Cause-Specific or Overall Survival in High-Risk Prostate Cancer Managed With Brachytherapy and Supplemental External Beam},
author = {Merrick, Gregory S. and Butler, Wayne M. and Wallner, Kent E. and Galbreath, Robert W. and Ohio University Eastern, St. Clairsville, OH and Allen, Zachariah A. and Adamovich, Edward and Lief, Jonathan},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To determine cause-specific survival (CSS), biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS), and overall survival (OS) in high-risk prostate cancer patients undergoing brachytherapy with or without supplemental therapies. Methods and Materials: Between April 1995 and July 2002, 204 patients with high-risk prostate cancer (Gleason score {>=}8 or prostate-specific antigen [PSA] >20 ng/mL or clinical stage {>=}T2c) underwent brachytherapy. Median follow-up was 7.0 years. The bPFS was defined by a PSA {<=}0.40 ng/mL after nadir. Multiple clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters were evaluated for the impact on survival. Results: The 10-year CSS, bPFS, and OS were 88.9%, 86.6%, and 68.6%, respectively. A statistically significant difference in bPFS was discerned between hormone naive, ADT {<=}6 months, and ADT >6 month cohorts (79.7% vs. 95.% vs. 89.9%, p = 0.032). Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) did not impact CSS or OS. For bPFS patients, the median posttreatment PSA was <0.04 ng/mL. A Cox linear regression analysis demonstrated that Gleason score was the best predictor of CSS, whereas percent positive biopsies and duration of ADT best predicted for bPFS. The OS was best predicted by Gleason score and diabetes. Thirty-eight patients have died, with 26 of the deaths from cardiovascular/pulmonary disease or second malignancy. Eleven patients have died of metastatic prostate cancer. Conclusions: The ADT improved 10-year bPFS without statistical impact on CSS or OS. Death as a result of cardiovascular/pulmonary disease and second malignancies were more than twice as common as prostate cancer deaths. Strategies to improve cardiovascular health should positively impact OS.},
doi = {10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.11.046},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 1,
volume = 68,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Tue May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
  • Purpose: To determine if androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) has an impact on cause-specific, biochemical progression-free, or overall survival after prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: From April 1995 through June 2002, 938 consecutive patients underwent brachytherapy for clinical Stage T1b to T3a (2002 AJCC) prostate cancer. All patients underwent brachytherapy more than 3 years before analysis. A total of 382 patients (40.7%) received ADT with a duration of 6 months or less in 277 and more than 6 months in 105. The median follow-up was 5.4 years. Multiple clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters were evaluated as predictors of cause-specific, biochemical progression-free, andmore » overall survival. Results: The 10-year cause-specific, biochemical progression-free, and overall survival rates for the entire cohort were 96.4%, 95.9%, and 78.1%, respectively. Except for biochemical progression-free survival in high-risk patients, ADT did not statistically impact any of the three survival categories. A Cox linear-regression analysis demonstrated that Gleason score was the best predictor of cause-specific survival, whereas percent-positive biopsies, prostate volume, and risk group predicted for biochemical progression-free survival. Patient age and tobacco use were the strongest predictors of overall survival. One hundred two patients have died, with 80 of the deaths a result of cardiovascular disease (54) and second malignancies (26). To date, only 12 patients have died of metastatic prostate cancer. Conclusions: After brachytherapy, androgen-deprivation therapy did not have an impact on cause-specific or overall survival for any risk group; however, ADT had a beneficial effect on biochemical progression-free survival in high-risk patients. Cardiovascular disease and second malignancies far outweighed prostate cancer as competing causes of death.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate the role of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) and duration for high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with dose-escalated radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis of high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with dose-escalated RT (minimum 75 Gy) with or without ADT was performed. The relationship between ADT use and duration with biochemical failure (BF), metastatic failure (MF), prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM), non-prostate cancer death (NPCD), and overall survival (OS) was assessed as a function of pretreatment characteristics, comorbid medical illness, and treatment using Fine and Gray's cumulative incidence methodology. Results: The median follow-up time was 64more » months. In men with National Comprehensive Cancer Network defined high-risk prostate cancer treated with dose-escalated RT, on univariate analysis, both metastasis (P<.0001; hazard ratio 0.34; 95% confidence interval 0.18-0.67; cumulative incidence at 60 months 13% vs 35%) and PCSM (P=.015; hazard ratio 0.41; 95% confidence interval 0.2-1.0; cumulative incidence at 60 months 6% vs 11%) were improved with the use of ADT. On multivariate analysis for all high-risk patients, Gleason score was the strongest negative prognostic factor, and long-term ADT (LTAD) improved MF (P=.002), PCSM (P=.034), and OS (P=.001). In men with prostate cancer and Gleason scores 8 to 10, on multivariate analysis after adjustment for other risk features, there was a duration-dependent improvement in BF, metastasis, PCSM, and OS, all favoring LTAD in comparison with STAD or RT alone. Conclusion: For men with high-risk prostate cancer treated with dose-escalated EBRT, this retrospective study suggests that the combination of LTAD and RT provided a significant improvement in clinical outcome, which was especially true for those with Gleason scores of 8 to 10.« less
  • Purpose: We compare the efficacy and toxicity among the 3 major modalities available used to treat high-risk prostate cancer (HRCaP). Methods and Materials: From 1996 to 2012, 2557 HRCaP patients were treated: 734 received external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) with or without androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), 515 received low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy (LDR) with or without ADT, and 1308 received radical prostatectomy (RP) with or without EBRT. Biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS), clinical relapse-free survival (cRFS), and prostate cancer–specific mortality (PCSM) were assessed. Toxicity was assessed using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.03. The log-rank test compared bRFS andmore » cRFS among the modalities, and Cox regression identified factors associated with bRFS and cRFS. Gray's test compared differences in late toxicity and PSCM among the modalities. Competing risk regression identified factors associated with PCSM. Results: The median follow-up time and age were 63.5 months and 65 years, respectively. The bRFS at 5 and 10 years, respectively, was 74% and 53% for EBRT, 74% and 52% for LDR, and 65% and 47% for RP (P=.0001). The cRFS at 5 and 10 years, respectively, was 85% and 73% for EBRT, 90% and 76% for LDR, and 89% and 75% for RP (P=.121). The PCSM at 5 and 10 years, respectively, was 5.3% and 11.2% for EBRT, 3.2% and 3.6% for LDR, and 2.8% and 6.8% for RP (P=.0004). The 10-year cumulative incidence of ≥grade 3 genitourinary toxicity was 8.1% for EBRT, 7.2% for LDR, and 16.4% for RP (P<.0001). The 10-year cumulative incidence of ≥grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity was 4.6% for EBRT, 1.1% for LDR, and 1.0% for RP (P<.0001). Conclusion: HRCaP treated with EBRT, LDR, or RP yields efficacy showing better bRFS for LDR and EBRT relative to RP, equivalence for cRFS, and a PCSM advantage of LDR and RP over EBRT. The toxicity is lowest for LDR.« less
  • Purpose: We investigated the benefit of short-term androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) in patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer (PC) receiving dose-escalated external beam radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: The present retrospective study comprised 710 intermediate-risk PC patients receiving external beam radiation therapy with doses of ≥81 Gy at a single institution from 1992 to 2005, including 357 patients receiving neoadjuvant and concurrent ADT. Prostate-specific antigen recurrence-free survival (PSA-RFS) and distant metastasis (DM) were compared using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazards models. PC-specific mortality (PCSM) was assessed using competing-risks analysis. Results: The median follow-up was 7.9 years. Despite being more likelymore » to have higher PSA levels, Gleason score 4 + 3 = 7, multiple National Comprehensive Cancer Network intermediate-risk factors, and older age (P≤.001 for all comparisons), patients receiving ADT had improved PSA-RFS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.598; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.435-0.841; P=.003), DM (HR, 0.424; 95% CI, 0.219-0.819; P=.011), and PCSM (HR, 0.380; 95% CI, 0.157-0.921; P=.032) on univariate analysis. Using multivariate analysis, ADT was an even stronger predictor of improved PSA-RFS (adjusted HR [AHR], 0.516; 95% CI, 0.360-0.739; P<.001), DM (AHR, 0.347; 95% CI, 0.176-0.685; P=.002), and PCSM (AHR, 0.297; 95% CI, 0.128-0.685; P=.004). Gleason score 4 + 3 = 7 and ≥50% positive biopsy cores were other independent predictors of PCSM. Conclusions: Short-term ADT improves PSA-RFS, DM, and PCSM in patients with intermediate-risk PC undergoing dose-escalated external beam radiation therapy.« less
  • Purpose: To determine the false call (FC) rate for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) relapse according to nine different PSA relapse definitions after a PSA fluctuation (bounce) has occurred after external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) or brachytherapy, with or without adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy. Methods and Materials: An analysis of a prospective database of 2030 patients was conducted. Prostate-specific antigen relapse was scored according to the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO), Vancouver, threshold + n, and nadir + n definitions for the complete data set and then compared against a truncated data set, with data subsequent to the heightmore » of the bounce deleted. The FC rate was calculated for each definition. Results: The bounce rate, with this very liberal definition of bounce, was 58% with EBRT and 84% with brachytherapy. The FC rate was lowest with nadir + 2 and + 3 definitions (2.2% and 1.6%, respectively) and greatest with low-threshold and ASTRO definitions (32% and 18%, respectively). The ASTRO definition was particularly susceptible to FC when androgen deprivation therapy was used with radiation (24%). Discussion: New definitions of biochemical non-evidence of disease that are more robust than the ASTRO definition have been identified. Those with the least FC rates are the nadir + 2 and nadir + 3 definitions, both of which are being considered to replace the ASTRO definition by the 2005 meeting of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group-ASTRO consensus panel.« less