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Title: Clinical Outcome in Posthysterectomy Cervical Cancer Patients Treated With Concurrent Cisplatin and Intensity-Modulated Pelvic Radiotherapy: Comparison With Conventional Radiotherapy

Abstract

Purpose: To assess local control and acute and chronic toxicity with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) as adjuvant treatment of cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Between April 2002 and February 2006, 68 patients at high risk of cervical cancer after hysterectomy were treated with adjuvant pelvic radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy consisted of cisplatin (50 mg/m{sup 2}) for six cycles every week. Thirty-three patients received adjuvant radiotherapy by IMRT. Before the IMRT series was initiated, 35 other patients underwent conventional four-field radiotherapy (Box-RT). The two groups did not differ significantly in respect of clinicopathologic and treatment factors. Results: IMRT provided compatible local tumor control compared with Box-RT. The actuarial 1-year locoregional control for patients in the IMRT and Box-RT groups was 93% and 94%, respectively. IMRT was well tolerated, with significant reduction in acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicities compared with the Box-RT group (GI 36 vs. 80%, p = 0.00012; GU 30 vs. 60%, p = 0.022). Furthermore, the IMRT group had lower rates of chronic GI and GU toxicities than the Box-RT patients (GI 6 vs. 34%, p = 0.002; GU 9 vs. 23%, p = 0.231). Conclusion: Our results suggest that IMRT significantly improved the tolerancemore » to adjuvant chemoradiotherapy with compatible locoregional control compared with conventional Box-RT. However, longer follow-up and more patients are needed to confirm the benefits of IMRT.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [1];  [1];  [3]
  1. Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Taiwan (China)
  2. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Taiwan (China)
  3. Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Taiwan (China). E-mail: rto_chen@yahoo.com.tw
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20951589
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 67; Journal Issue: 5; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.11.005; PII: S0360-3016(06)03393-1; Copyright (c) 2007 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; CARCINOMAS; CHEMOTHERAPY; COMBINED THERAPY; FEMALE GENITALS; PATIENTS; RADIOTHERAPY; TOXICITY; UTERUS

Citation Formats

Chen, M.-F., Tseng, C.-J., Tseng, C.-C., Kuo, Y.-C., Yu, C.-Y., and Chen, W.-C. Clinical Outcome in Posthysterectomy Cervical Cancer Patients Treated With Concurrent Cisplatin and Intensity-Modulated Pelvic Radiotherapy: Comparison With Conventional Radiotherapy. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.11.005.
Chen, M.-F., Tseng, C.-J., Tseng, C.-C., Kuo, Y.-C., Yu, C.-Y., & Chen, W.-C. Clinical Outcome in Posthysterectomy Cervical Cancer Patients Treated With Concurrent Cisplatin and Intensity-Modulated Pelvic Radiotherapy: Comparison With Conventional Radiotherapy. United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.11.005.
Chen, M.-F., Tseng, C.-J., Tseng, C.-C., Kuo, Y.-C., Yu, C.-Y., and Chen, W.-C. Sun . "Clinical Outcome in Posthysterectomy Cervical Cancer Patients Treated With Concurrent Cisplatin and Intensity-Modulated Pelvic Radiotherapy: Comparison With Conventional Radiotherapy". United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.11.005.
@article{osti_20951589,
title = {Clinical Outcome in Posthysterectomy Cervical Cancer Patients Treated With Concurrent Cisplatin and Intensity-Modulated Pelvic Radiotherapy: Comparison With Conventional Radiotherapy},
author = {Chen, M.-F. and Tseng, C.-J. and Tseng, C.-C. and Kuo, Y.-C. and Yu, C.-Y. and Chen, W.-C.},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To assess local control and acute and chronic toxicity with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) as adjuvant treatment of cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Between April 2002 and February 2006, 68 patients at high risk of cervical cancer after hysterectomy were treated with adjuvant pelvic radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy consisted of cisplatin (50 mg/m{sup 2}) for six cycles every week. Thirty-three patients received adjuvant radiotherapy by IMRT. Before the IMRT series was initiated, 35 other patients underwent conventional four-field radiotherapy (Box-RT). The two groups did not differ significantly in respect of clinicopathologic and treatment factors. Results: IMRT provided compatible local tumor control compared with Box-RT. The actuarial 1-year locoregional control for patients in the IMRT and Box-RT groups was 93% and 94%, respectively. IMRT was well tolerated, with significant reduction in acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicities compared with the Box-RT group (GI 36 vs. 80%, p = 0.00012; GU 30 vs. 60%, p = 0.022). Furthermore, the IMRT group had lower rates of chronic GI and GU toxicities than the Box-RT patients (GI 6 vs. 34%, p = 0.002; GU 9 vs. 23%, p = 0.231). Conclusion: Our results suggest that IMRT significantly improved the tolerance to adjuvant chemoradiotherapy with compatible locoregional control compared with conventional Box-RT. However, longer follow-up and more patients are needed to confirm the benefits of IMRT.},
doi = {10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.11.005},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 5,
volume = 67,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
  • Purpose: To identify dosimetric parameters associated with acute hematologic toxicity (HT) and chemotherapy delivery in cervical cancer patients undergoing concurrent chemotherapy and intensity-modulated pelvic radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 37 cervical cancer patients receiving concurrent cisplatin (40 mg/m{sup 2}/wk) and intensity-modulated pelvic radiotherapy. Pelvic bone marrow (BM) was contoured for each patient and divided into three subsites: lumbosacral spine, ilium, and lower pelvis. The volume of each region receiving 10, 20, 30, and {>=}40 Gy (V{sub 1}, V{sub 2}, V{sub 3}, and V{sub 4}, respectively) was calculated. HT was graded according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group system. Multivariate regressionmore » models were used to test associations between dosimetric parameters and HT and chemotherapy delivery. Results: Increased pelvic BM V{sub 1} (BM-V{sub 1}) was associated with an increased Grade 2 or worse leukopenia and neutropenia (odds ratio [OR], 2.09; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.24-3.53; p = 0.006; and OR, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.02-1.94; p = 0.037, respectively). Patients with BM-V{sub 1} {>=}90% had higher rates of Grade 2 or worse leukopenia and neutropenia than did patients with BM-V{sub 1} <90% (11.1% vs. 73.7%, p < 0.01; and 5.6% vs. 31.6%, p = 0.09) and were more likely to have chemotherapy held on univariate (16.7% vs. 47.4%, p = 0.08) and multivariate (OR, 32.2; 95% CI, 1.67-622; p = 0.02) analysis. No associations between HT and V{sub 3} and V{sub 4} were observed. Dosimetric parameters involving the lumbosacral spine and lower pelvis had stronger associations with HT than did those involving the ilium. Conclusion: The volume of pelvic BM receiving low-dose radiation is associated with HT and chemotherapy delivery in cervical cancer patients undergoing concurrent chemoradiotherapy.« less
  • Purpose: To assess the early clinical outcomes with concurrent cisplatin and extended-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (EF-IMRT) for carcinoma of the cervix. Methods and Materials: Thirty-six patients with Stage IB2-IVA cervical cancer treated with EF-IMRT were evaluated. The pelvic lymph nodes were involved in 19 patients, and of these 19 patients, 10 also had para-aortic nodal disease. The treatment volume included the cervix, uterus, parametria, presacral space, upper vagina, and pelvic, common iliac, and para-aortic nodes to the superior border of L1. Patients were assessed for acute toxicities according to the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0.more » All late toxicities were scored with the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group late toxicity score. Results: All patients completed the prescribed course of EF-IMRT. All but 2 patients received brachytherapy. Median length of treatment was 53 days. The median follow-up was 18 months. Acute Grade {>=}3 gastrointestinal, genitourinary, and myelotoxicity were seen in 1, 1, and 10 patients, respectively. Thirty-four patients had complete response to treatment. Of these 34 patients, 11 developed recurrences. The first site of recurrence was in-field in 2 patients (pelvis in 1, pelvis and para-aortic in 1) and distant in 9 patients. The 2-year actuarial locoregional control, disease-free survival, overall survival, and Grade {>=}3 toxicity rates for the entire cohort were 80%, 51%, 65%, and 10%, respectively. Conclusion: Extended-field IMRT with concurrent chemotherapy was tolerated well, with acceptable acute and early late toxicities. The locoregional control rate was good, with distant metastases being the predominant mode of failure. We are continuing to accrue a larger number of patients and longer follow-up data to further extend our initial observations with this approach.« less
  • Purpose: To test, though a control-cohort study, the hypothesis that concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) using weekly cisplatin, plus high-dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDRICB) is superior to radiation (RT) alone in patients with advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 171 patients with Stage IIB-III cervical cancer were enrolled in this study. Seventy patients were treated with CCRT and the results were compared with those of 101 patients who had been treated with RT using the same protocol at an early period. RT consisted of 45 Gy in 25 fractions to the whole pelvis, followed by a 12.6-Gy boost tomore » the parametrium. Four courses of HDRICB using 6.0 Gy to Point A were performed. Chemotherapy consisted of weekly cisplatin at a dose of 40 mg/m{sup 2} for 5-6 cycles. Results: The 4-year actuarial survival was 74% for the CCRT group and 68% for the RT group (p = 0.60). The 4-year pelvic relapse-free survival was 87% for the CCRT group and 85% for the RT group (p = 0.37). The 4-year distant metastases-free survival was 75% for the CCRT group and 76% for the RT group (p = 0.44). The cumulative incidence of gastrointestinal and genitourinary injuries of grade 3 or above was 14.3% for the CCRT group and 7.9% for the RT group (p = 0.19). Conclusion: This study did not show a survival benefit of CCRT with weekly cisplatin and HDRICB for Stage II-III cervical cancer, nor did it demonstrate a significant increase of late complications when comparing with RT alone.« less
  • Purpose: To test the hypothesis that increased bowel radiation dose is associated with acute gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity in cervical cancer patients undergoing concurrent chemotherapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), using a previously derived normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model. Methods: Fifty patients with Stage I-III cervical cancer undergoing IMRT and concurrent weekly cisplatin were analyzed. Acute GI toxicity was graded using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale, excluding upper GI events. A logistic model was used to test correlations between acute GI toxicity and bowel dosimetric parameters. The primary objective was to test the association between Grade {>=}2 GI toxicitymore » and the volume of bowel receiving {>=}45 Gy (V{sub 45}) using the logistic model. Results: Twenty-three patients (46%) had Grade {>=}2 GI toxicity. The mean (SD) V{sub 45} was 143 mL (99). The mean V{sub 45} values for patients with and without Grade {>=}2 GI toxicity were 176 vs. 115 mL, respectively. Twenty patients (40%) had V{sub 45} >150 mL. The proportion of patients with Grade {>=}2 GI toxicity with and without V{sub 45} >150 mL was 65% vs. 33% (p = 0.03). Logistic model parameter estimates V50 and {gamma} were 161 mL (95% confidence interval [CI] 60-399) and 0.31 (95% CI 0.04-0.63), respectively. On multivariable logistic regression, increased V{sub 45} was associated with an increased odds of Grade {>=}2 GI toxicity (odds ratio 2.19 per 100 mL, 95% CI 1.04-4.63, p = 0.04). Conclusions: Our results support the hypothesis that increasing bowel V{sub 45} is correlated with increased GI toxicity in cervical cancer patients undergoing IMRT and concurrent cisplatin. Reducing bowel V{sub 45} could reduce the risk of Grade {>=}2 GI toxicity by approximately 50% per 100 mL of bowel spared.« less
  • Introduction: For patients with cervical cancer, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) improves target coverage and allows dose escalation while reducing the radiation dose to organs at risk (OARs). In this study, we compared dosimetric parameters among 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), “step-and-shoot” IMRT, and volumetric intensity-modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) in a series of patients with cervical cancer receiving definitive radiotherapy. Computed tomography (CT) scans of 10 patients with histologically proven cervical cancer treated with definitive radiation therapy (RT) from December 2008 to March 2010 at our department were selected for this study. The gross tumor volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV)more » were delineated following the guidelines of the Gyn IMRT consortium that included cervix, uterus, parametrial tissues, and the pelvic nodes including presacral. The median age was 57 years (range: 30 to 85 years). All 10 patients had squamous cell carcinoma with Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IB-IIIB. All patients were treated by VMAT. OAR doses were significantly reduced for plans with intensity-modulated technique compared with 3D-CRT except for the dose to the vagina. Between the 2 intensity-modulated techniques, significant difference was observed for the mean dose to the small intestine, to the benefit of VMAT (p < 0.001). There was no improvement in terms of OARs sparing for VMAT although there was a tendency for a slightly decreased average dose to the rectum: − 0.65 Gy but not significant (p = 0.07). The intensity modulation techniques have many advantages in terms of quality indexes, and particularly OAR sparing, compared with 3D-CRT. Following the ongoing technologic developments in modern radiotherapy, it is essential to evaluate the intensity-modulated techniques on prospective studies of a larger scale.« less