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Title: A Phase II Multi-institutional Trial of Chemoradiation Using Weekly Docetaxel and Erythropoietin for High-Risk Postoperative Head and Neck Cancer Patients

Abstract

Purpose: To determine efficacy and toxicities of postoperative concurrent chemoradiation using docetaxel in high-risk head and neck cancer. Methods and Materials: High-risk patients were enrolled 2-8 weeks after surgery. Treatment included 60 Gy for 6 weeks with weekly docetaxel 25 mg/m{sup 2} and erythropoietin alpha 40,000 U for hemoglobin {<=}12 g/dL. Primary endpoints included locoregional control (LC), disease-free survival (DFS), and patterns of failure (POF). Secondary endpoints were toxicity and quality of life. Results: Eighteen patients were enrolled (14 male, 4 female), aged 24-70 years (median, 55 years). Primary site included oropharynx = 7, oral cavity 8, hypopharynx = 1, and larynx = 2. Pathologic American Joint Committee on Cancer Stage was III = 3 patients, IV = 15 patients. High-risk eligibility included {>=}2 positive lymph nodes = 13, extracapsular extension = 10, positive margins = 8 (11 patients with two or more risk factors). Docetaxel was reduced to 20 mg/m{sup 2}/week after 5 patients had prolonged Grade 3 or higher mucositis. Overall, number of doses delivered was 2 of 6 = 1, 3 of 6 2, 4 of 6 = 2, 5 of 6 = 4, 6 of 6 = 9 patients. With median follow-up of 30 months (range,more » 5-66), 10 (56%) patients are alive and have no evidence of disease (NED); POF: three local recurrences (two with distant) and 1 distant only. One-year survival was 76%, median PFS and DFS had not been reached. Three-year LC was 82%. No Grade 3 or higher late toxicities were observed, although a few cases of prolonged mucositis and taste loss (>3 months) were seen, particularly at 25 mg/m{sup 2}/week. Conclusion: Postoperative radiation therapy with weekly docetaxel 20 or 25 mg/m{sup 2}/week for high-risk postoperative head and neck cancer caused intolerable mucosal toxicity, prompting early study termination. Further studies should consider 15 mg/m{sup 2}. Actuarial 3-year LC is 82%, similar to cisplatin-based chemoradiation regimens. Distant metastasis remains an important issue requiring additional systemic interventions.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [3];  [4];  [4];  [5];  [6];  [7];  [8];  [9];  [10]
  1. Department of Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, Tennessee (United States)
  2. Department of Medical Oncology, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, Tennessee (United States)
  3. Department of Otolaryngology, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, Tennessee (United States)
  4. Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, Tennessee (United States)
  5. Department of Biostatistics, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, Tennessee (United States)
  6. Department of Clinical Trials Office, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee (United States)
  7. Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, Colorado (United States)
  8. Department of Otolaryngology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, Colorado (United States)
  9. Department of Medical Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, Colorado (United States)
  10. Department of Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, Tennessee (United States). E-mail: anthony.cmelak@vanderbilt.edu
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20951574
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 67; Journal Issue: 5; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.11.033; PII: S0360-3016(06)03504-8; Copyright (c) 2007 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; CLINICAL TRIALS; ELDERLY PEOPLE; ERYTHROPOIETIN; FAILURES; HEAD; HEALTH HAZARDS; HEMOGLOBIN; LARYNX; LYMPH NODES; METASTASES; NECK; NEOPLASMS; ORAL CAVITY; PATIENTS; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY; SURGERY; TOXICITY

Citation Formats

Willey, Christopher D., Murphy, Barbara A., Netterville, James L., Burkey, Brian B., Shyr, Yu, Shakhtour, Bashar, Kish, Bonnie, Raben, David, Chen Changhu, Song, John I., Kane, Madeleine A., and Cmelak, Anthony J.. A Phase II Multi-institutional Trial of Chemoradiation Using Weekly Docetaxel and Erythropoietin for High-Risk Postoperative Head and Neck Cancer Patients. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.11.033.
Willey, Christopher D., Murphy, Barbara A., Netterville, James L., Burkey, Brian B., Shyr, Yu, Shakhtour, Bashar, Kish, Bonnie, Raben, David, Chen Changhu, Song, John I., Kane, Madeleine A., & Cmelak, Anthony J.. A Phase II Multi-institutional Trial of Chemoradiation Using Weekly Docetaxel and Erythropoietin for High-Risk Postoperative Head and Neck Cancer Patients. United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.11.033.
Willey, Christopher D., Murphy, Barbara A., Netterville, James L., Burkey, Brian B., Shyr, Yu, Shakhtour, Bashar, Kish, Bonnie, Raben, David, Chen Changhu, Song, John I., Kane, Madeleine A., and Cmelak, Anthony J.. Sun . "A Phase II Multi-institutional Trial of Chemoradiation Using Weekly Docetaxel and Erythropoietin for High-Risk Postoperative Head and Neck Cancer Patients". United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.11.033.
@article{osti_20951574,
title = {A Phase II Multi-institutional Trial of Chemoradiation Using Weekly Docetaxel and Erythropoietin for High-Risk Postoperative Head and Neck Cancer Patients},
author = {Willey, Christopher D. and Murphy, Barbara A. and Netterville, James L. and Burkey, Brian B. and Shyr, Yu and Shakhtour, Bashar and Kish, Bonnie and Raben, David and Chen Changhu and Song, John I. and Kane, Madeleine A. and Cmelak, Anthony J.},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To determine efficacy and toxicities of postoperative concurrent chemoradiation using docetaxel in high-risk head and neck cancer. Methods and Materials: High-risk patients were enrolled 2-8 weeks after surgery. Treatment included 60 Gy for 6 weeks with weekly docetaxel 25 mg/m{sup 2} and erythropoietin alpha 40,000 U for hemoglobin {<=}12 g/dL. Primary endpoints included locoregional control (LC), disease-free survival (DFS), and patterns of failure (POF). Secondary endpoints were toxicity and quality of life. Results: Eighteen patients were enrolled (14 male, 4 female), aged 24-70 years (median, 55 years). Primary site included oropharynx = 7, oral cavity 8, hypopharynx = 1, and larynx = 2. Pathologic American Joint Committee on Cancer Stage was III = 3 patients, IV = 15 patients. High-risk eligibility included {>=}2 positive lymph nodes = 13, extracapsular extension = 10, positive margins = 8 (11 patients with two or more risk factors). Docetaxel was reduced to 20 mg/m{sup 2}/week after 5 patients had prolonged Grade 3 or higher mucositis. Overall, number of doses delivered was 2 of 6 = 1, 3 of 6 2, 4 of 6 = 2, 5 of 6 = 4, 6 of 6 = 9 patients. With median follow-up of 30 months (range, 5-66), 10 (56%) patients are alive and have no evidence of disease (NED); POF: three local recurrences (two with distant) and 1 distant only. One-year survival was 76%, median PFS and DFS had not been reached. Three-year LC was 82%. No Grade 3 or higher late toxicities were observed, although a few cases of prolonged mucositis and taste loss (>3 months) were seen, particularly at 25 mg/m{sup 2}/week. Conclusion: Postoperative radiation therapy with weekly docetaxel 20 or 25 mg/m{sup 2}/week for high-risk postoperative head and neck cancer caused intolerable mucosal toxicity, prompting early study termination. Further studies should consider 15 mg/m{sup 2}. Actuarial 3-year LC is 82%, similar to cisplatin-based chemoradiation regimens. Distant metastasis remains an important issue requiring additional systemic interventions.},
doi = {10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.11.033},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 5,
volume = 67,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
  • Purpose: Inoperable locoregional recurrences of head-and-neck cancer in a previously irradiated volume represent a therapeutic dilemma. Chemotherapy alone has no curative potential, whereas reirradiation and concurrent chemoradiation can salvage a small fraction of patients. Mucosal toxicity of concurrent chemoradiation requires substantial dose reduction of chemotherapy. Alternating chemoradiation offers the chance to give both full-dose chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The latter may provide a particular advantage for recurrent, potentially radiation resistant tumors. The feasibility and efficacy of a full-dose docetaxel containing alternating chemoradiation schedule was tested. Patients and Methods: Twenty-seven patients (Karnofsky performance status score {>=}70%) with histologically proven recurrent squamous cellmore » cancer that occurred {>=} 6 months in a previously irradiated area ({>=} 60 Gy) were considered unresectable and unsuitable for brachytherapy. Alternating chemoradiation consisted of 3 cycles of docetaxel 60 mg/m{sup 2} d1 and cisplatin 15 mg/m{sup 2} d2-5, q d22, and involved field radiotherapy 2.0 Gy every day d8-12, d15-19, d29-33, and d36-40 (40.0 Gy total dose). Dose reduction of docetaxel to 50 mg/m{sup 2} was necessary, because of hematologic toxicity in the first 12 patients. Results: Alternating chemoreirradiation was applied as planned in 12 of 27 patients, with reirradiation completed per protocol in 81%. Overall, patients received 83% of the intended dose of docetaxel and 73% of cisplatin. Third-degree common toxicity criteria mucositis occurred in 15%, leukopenia of {>=} third degree by common toxicity criteria in 37%, and 3 early deaths were observed. Median time to follow-up, time to local progression, median survival, and 3-year survival rates were 42 months, 10 months, 10 months, and 18%, respectively. Conclusions: Alternating chemoreirradiation in recurrences of head-and-neck cancer resulted in 80% overall response with acceptable toxicity. A significant minority of patients had durable tumor control with a chance of long-term survival.« less
  • Purpose: To investigate a novel chemoradiation regimen designed to maximize locoregional control (LRC) and minimize toxicity for patients with advanced head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods and Materials: Patients received hyperfractionated intensity modulated radiation therapy (HIMRT) in 1.25-Gy fractions b.i.d. to 70 Gy to high-risk planning target volume (PTV). Intermediate and low-risk PTVs received 60 Gy and 50 Gy, at 1.07, and 0.89 Gy per fraction, respectively. Concurrent cisplatin 33 mg/m{sup 2}/week was started Week 1. Patients completed the Quality of Life Radiation Therapy Instrument pretreatment (PRE), at end of treatment (EOT), and at 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12more » months. Overall survival (OS), progression-free (PFS), LRC, and toxicities were assessed. Results: Of 39 patients, 30 (77%) were alive without disease at median follow-up of 37.5 months. Actuarial 3-year OS, PFS, and LRC were 80%, 82%, and 87%, respectively. No failures occurred in the electively irradiated neck and there were no isolated neck failures. Head and neck QOL was significantly worse in 18 of 35 patients (51%): mean 7.8 PRE vs. 3.9 EOT. By month 1, H and N QOL returned near baseline (mean 6.2, SD = 1.7). The most common acute Grade 3+ toxicities were mucositis (38%), fatigue (28%), dysphagia (28%), and leukopenia (26%). Conclusions: Hyperfractionated IMRT with low-dose weekly cisplatin resulted in good LRC with acceptable toxicity and QOL. Lack of elective nodal failures despite very low dose per fraction has led to an attempt to further minimize toxicity by reducing elective nodal doses in our subsequent protocol.« less
  • Purpose: Previous analysis of this Intergroup trial demonstrated that with a median follow-up among surviving patients of 45.9 months, the concurrent postoperative administration of cisplatin and radiation therapy improved local-regional control and disease-free survival of patients who had high-risk resectable head-and-neck carcinomas. With a minimum of 10 years of follow-up potentially now available for all patients, these results are updated here to examine long-term outcomes. Methods and Materials: A total of 410 analyzable patients who had high-risk resected head-and-neck cancers were prospectively randomized to receive either radiation therapy (RT: 60 Gy in 6 weeks) or identical RT plus cisplatin, 100more » mg/m{sup 2}i.v. on days 1, 22, and 43 (RT + CT). Results: At 10 years, the local-regional failure rates were 28.8% vs 22.3% (P=.10), disease-free survival was 19.1% vs 20.1% (P=.25), and overall survival was 27.0% vs 29.1% (P=.31) for patients treated by RT vs RT + CT, respectively. In the unplanned subset analysis limited to patients who had microscopically involved resection margins and/or extracapsular spread of disease, local-regional failure occurred in 33.1% vs 21.0% (P=.02), disease-free survival was 12.3% vs 18.4% (P=.05), and overall survival was 19.6% vs 27.1% (P=.07), respectively. Conclusion: At a median follow-up of 9.4 years for surviving patients, no significant differences in outcome were observed in the analysis of all randomized eligible patients. However, analysis of the subgroup of patients who had either microscopically involved resection margins and/or extracapsular spread of disease showed improved local-regional control and disease-free survival with concurrent administration of chemotherapy. The remaining subgroup of patients who were enrolled only because they had tumor in 2 or more lymph nodes did not benefit from the addition of CT to RT.« less
  • Purpose: To determine whether the addition of recombinant human erythropoietin (Epo) could improve the outcomes of anemic patients receiving definitive radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had SCCHN, with a plan for continuous-course definitive radiotherapy (66-72 Gy) with or without chemotherapy. Patients with Stage III or IV SCCHN were required to undergo concurrent chemoradiotherapy and/or accelerated fractionation radiotherapy. Preradiotherapy hemoglobin was required to be between 9.0 g/dL and 13.5 g/dL (12.5 g/dL for women). Patients randomized to Epo received 40,000 U once weekly, starting 7-10 days before start of radiotherapy.more » Results: A total of 148 patients were enrolled; 141 were evaluable. Median pretreatment hemoglobin was 12.1 g/dL. Hemoglobin levels at 4 weeks rose by an average of 1.66 g/dL in the Epo arm, compared with an average 0.24 g/dL decrease in the control arm (p = 0.0001). Median follow-up was 2.5 years (3.1 years for surviving patients). There was no statistically significant difference in the primary endpoint of local-regional failure (LRF) rate between the treatment arms. The 3-year LRF rate was 36% for control and 44% for Epo (p = 0.56). There were also no significant differences in local-regional progression-free survival (LRPFS), patterns of failure, overall survival, or toxicity. The 3-year LRPFS rate was 52% for control and 47% for Epo. The overall survival rate was 57% and 56%, respectively. Conclusions: The addition of Epo to definitive radiotherapy for SCCHN did not improve outcomes. The study was not specifically designed to detect a potential negative association between Epo and tumor progression/survival.« less
  • Purpose: We report the long-term results of a prospective, Phase II study of long-term androgen deprivation (AD), pelvic radiotherapy (EBRT), permanent transperineal prostate brachytherapy boost (PB), and adjuvant docetaxel in patients with high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligibility included biopsy-proven prostate adenocarcinoma with the following: prostate-specific antigen (PSA) > 20 ng/ml; or Gleason score of 7 and a PSA >10 ng/ml; or any Gleason score of 8 to 10; or stage T2b to T3 irrespective of Gleason score or PSA. Treatment consisted of 45 Gy of pelvic EBRT, followed 1 month later by PB with either iodine-125 or Pd-103.more » One month after PB, patients received three cycles of docetaxel chemotherapy (35 mg/m{sup 2} per week, Days 1, 8, and 15 every 28 days). All patients received 2 years of AD. Biochemical failure was defined as per the Phoenix definition (PSA nadir + 2). Results: From August 2000 to March 2004, 42 patients were enrolled. The median overall and active follow-ups were 5.6 years (range, 0.9-7.8 years) and 6.3 years (range, 4-7.8 years), respectively. Grade 2 and 3 acute genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities were 50.0% and 14.2%, respectively, with no Grade 4 toxicities noted. Grade 3 and 4 acute hematologic toxicities were 19% and 2.4%, respectively. Of the patients, 85.7% were able to complete the planned multimodality treatment. The 5- and 7-year actuarial freedom from biochemical failures rates were 89.6% and 86.5%, and corresponding rates for disease-free survival were 76.2% and 70.4%, respectively. The 5- and 7-year actuarial overall survival rates were 83.3% and 80.1%, respectively. The 5- and 7-year actuarial rates of late Grade 2 GI/GU toxicity (no Grade 3-5) was 7.7%. Conclusions: The trimodality approach of using 2 years of AD, external radiation, brachytherapy, and upfront docetaxel in high-risk prostate cancer is well tolerated, produces encouraging long-term results, and should be validated in a multi-institutional setting.« less