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Title: Does Zinc Sulfate Prevent Therapy-Induced Taste Alterations in Head and Neck Cancer Patients? Results of Phase III Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial from the North Central Cancer Treatment Group (N01C4)

Abstract

Purpose: Taste alterations (dysgeusia) are well described in head and neck cancer patients who undergo radiotherapy (RT). Anecdotal observations and pilot studies have suggested zinc may mitigate these symptoms. This multi-institutional, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted to provide definitive evidence of this mineral's palliative efficacy. Methods and Materials: A total of 169 evaluable patients were randomly assigned to zinc sulfate 45 mg orally three times daily vs. placebo. Treatment was to be given throughout RT and for 1 month after. All patients were scheduled to receive {>=}2,000 cGy of external beam RT to {>=}30% of the oral cavity, were able to take oral medication, and had no oral thrush at study entry. Changes in taste were assessed using the previously validated Wickham questionnaire. Results: At baseline, the groups were comparable in age, gender, and planned radiation dose (<6,000 vs. {>=}6,000 cGy). Overall, 61 zinc-treated (73%) and 71 placebo-exposed (84%) patients described taste alterations during the first 2 months (p = 0.16). The median interval to taste alterations was 2.3 vs. 1.6 weeks in the zinc-treated and placebo-exposed patients, respectively (p = 0.09). The reported taste alterations included the absence of any taste (16%), bitter taste (8%), salty taste (5%), sourmore » taste (4%), sweet taste (5%), and the presence of a metallic taste (10%), as well as other descriptions provided by a write in response (81%). Zinc sulfate did not favorably affect the interval to taste recovery. Conclusion: Zinc sulfate, as prescribed in this trial, did not prevent taste alterations in cancer patients who were undergoing RT to the oral pharynx.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [1];  [3];  [5];  [6];  [7];  [8];  [9];  [3]
  1. Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States)
  2. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States). E-mail: Jatoi.aminah@mayo.edu
  3. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)
  4. Upstate Carolina CCOP, Spartanburg, SC (United States)
  5. Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL (United States)
  6. Missouri Valley Consortium, Omaha, NB (United States)
  7. Illinois Oncology Research Consortium, Omaha, NB (United States)
  8. Wichita Community Clinical Oncology Program, Wichita, KS (United States)
  9. Michigan Cancer Consortium, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20951573
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 67; Journal Issue: 5; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.10.046; PII: S0360-3016(06)03384-0; Copyright (c) 2007 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; HEAD; NECK; NEOPLASMS; ORAL CAVITY; PATIENTS; PHARYNX; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY; SYMPTOMS; ZINC SULFATES

Citation Formats

Halyard, Michele Y., Jatoi, Aminah, Sloan, Jeff A., Bearden, James D., Vora, Sujay A., Atherton, Pamela J., Perez, Edith A., Soori, Gammi, Zalduendo, Anthony C., Zhu, Angela, Stella, Philip J., and Loprinzi, Charles L.. Does Zinc Sulfate Prevent Therapy-Induced Taste Alterations in Head and Neck Cancer Patients? Results of Phase III Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial from the North Central Cancer Treatment Group (N01C4). United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.10.046.
Halyard, Michele Y., Jatoi, Aminah, Sloan, Jeff A., Bearden, James D., Vora, Sujay A., Atherton, Pamela J., Perez, Edith A., Soori, Gammi, Zalduendo, Anthony C., Zhu, Angela, Stella, Philip J., & Loprinzi, Charles L.. Does Zinc Sulfate Prevent Therapy-Induced Taste Alterations in Head and Neck Cancer Patients? Results of Phase III Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial from the North Central Cancer Treatment Group (N01C4). United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.10.046.
Halyard, Michele Y., Jatoi, Aminah, Sloan, Jeff A., Bearden, James D., Vora, Sujay A., Atherton, Pamela J., Perez, Edith A., Soori, Gammi, Zalduendo, Anthony C., Zhu, Angela, Stella, Philip J., and Loprinzi, Charles L.. Sun . "Does Zinc Sulfate Prevent Therapy-Induced Taste Alterations in Head and Neck Cancer Patients? Results of Phase III Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial from the North Central Cancer Treatment Group (N01C4)". United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.10.046.
@article{osti_20951573,
title = {Does Zinc Sulfate Prevent Therapy-Induced Taste Alterations in Head and Neck Cancer Patients? Results of Phase III Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial from the North Central Cancer Treatment Group (N01C4)},
author = {Halyard, Michele Y. and Jatoi, Aminah and Sloan, Jeff A. and Bearden, James D. and Vora, Sujay A. and Atherton, Pamela J. and Perez, Edith A. and Soori, Gammi and Zalduendo, Anthony C. and Zhu, Angela and Stella, Philip J. and Loprinzi, Charles L.},
abstractNote = {Purpose: Taste alterations (dysgeusia) are well described in head and neck cancer patients who undergo radiotherapy (RT). Anecdotal observations and pilot studies have suggested zinc may mitigate these symptoms. This multi-institutional, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted to provide definitive evidence of this mineral's palliative efficacy. Methods and Materials: A total of 169 evaluable patients were randomly assigned to zinc sulfate 45 mg orally three times daily vs. placebo. Treatment was to be given throughout RT and for 1 month after. All patients were scheduled to receive {>=}2,000 cGy of external beam RT to {>=}30% of the oral cavity, were able to take oral medication, and had no oral thrush at study entry. Changes in taste were assessed using the previously validated Wickham questionnaire. Results: At baseline, the groups were comparable in age, gender, and planned radiation dose (<6,000 vs. {>=}6,000 cGy). Overall, 61 zinc-treated (73%) and 71 placebo-exposed (84%) patients described taste alterations during the first 2 months (p = 0.16). The median interval to taste alterations was 2.3 vs. 1.6 weeks in the zinc-treated and placebo-exposed patients, respectively (p = 0.09). The reported taste alterations included the absence of any taste (16%), bitter taste (8%), salty taste (5%), sour taste (4%), sweet taste (5%), and the presence of a metallic taste (10%), as well as other descriptions provided by a write in response (81%). Zinc sulfate did not favorably affect the interval to taste recovery. Conclusion: Zinc sulfate, as prescribed in this trial, did not prevent taste alterations in cancer patients who were undergoing RT to the oral pharynx.},
doi = {10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.10.046},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 5,
volume = 67,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}