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Title: Is Mastectomy Superior to Breast-Conserving Treatment for Young Women?

Abstract

Purpose: To examine whether modified radical mastectomy (MRM) improves outcomes compared with breast-conserving treatment (BCT) in young women. Methods and Materials: Women aged 20-49 years, diagnosed with early breast cancer between 1989 and 1998, were identified. Management with BCT or MRM was compared for local (L), locoregional (LR), and distant relapse-free survival (DRFS) and breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS) by age group (20-39 years, 40-49 years). The analysis was repeated for patients considered 'ideal' candidates for BCT: tumor size {<=}2 cm, pathologically negative axillary nodes, negative margins, and no reported ductal carcinoma in situ. Results: A total of 1,597 women received BCT, and 801 had MRM. After a median follow-up of 9.0 years, the outcomes (L, LR, BCSS) were worse for the younger age group; however, the outcomes were not statistically different by type of local treatment. For women aged 20-39 years considered 'ideal' for BCT, those treated with BCT had slightly lower LRFS compared with those treated with MRM (p = 0.3), but DRFS and BCSS were similar. Conclusions: A difference in LRFS at 10 years potentially favored MRM among women aged 20-39 years considered 'ideal' BCT candidates but was not statistically significant and did not translate into a noticeablemore » difference in DRFS or BCSS. Our data suggest that young age alone is not a contraindication to BCT.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [1];  [5];  [6];  [5];  [3];  [5];  [5];  [1];  [5];  [3];  [5];  [5]
  1. Radiation Therapy Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada)
  2. Radiation Therapy Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada) and Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada) and University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada). E-mail: styldesl@bccancer.bc.ca
  3. Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada)
  4. Population and Preventive Oncology Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency (BCCA), Vancouver, BC (Canada)
  5. (Canada)
  6. Systemic Therapy Program, BCCA, Vancouver Island Centre, Victoria, BC (Canada)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20951569
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 67; Journal Issue: 5; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.11.032; PII: S0360-3016(06)03505-X; Copyright (c) 2007 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; CARCINOMAS; EFFICIENCY; MAMMARY GLANDS; RADIOPROTECTIVE SUBSTANCES; RADIOTHERAPY; SURGERY; WOMEN

Citation Formats

Coulombe, Genevieve, Tyldesley, Scott, Speers, Caroline B.A., Paltiel, Chuck M.Sc., Aquino-Parsons, Christina, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Bernstein, Vanessa, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Truong, Pauline T., Radiation Therapy Program, BCCA, Vancouver Island Centre, Victoria, BC, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Keyes, Mira, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Olivotto, Ivo A., Radiation Therapy Program, BCCA, Vancouver Island Centre, Victoria, BC, and University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC. Is Mastectomy Superior to Breast-Conserving Treatment for Young Women?. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.11.032.
Coulombe, Genevieve, Tyldesley, Scott, Speers, Caroline B.A., Paltiel, Chuck M.Sc., Aquino-Parsons, Christina, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Bernstein, Vanessa, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Truong, Pauline T., Radiation Therapy Program, BCCA, Vancouver Island Centre, Victoria, BC, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Keyes, Mira, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Olivotto, Ivo A., Radiation Therapy Program, BCCA, Vancouver Island Centre, Victoria, BC, & University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC. Is Mastectomy Superior to Breast-Conserving Treatment for Young Women?. United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.11.032.
Coulombe, Genevieve, Tyldesley, Scott, Speers, Caroline B.A., Paltiel, Chuck M.Sc., Aquino-Parsons, Christina, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Bernstein, Vanessa, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Truong, Pauline T., Radiation Therapy Program, BCCA, Vancouver Island Centre, Victoria, BC, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Keyes, Mira, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Olivotto, Ivo A., Radiation Therapy Program, BCCA, Vancouver Island Centre, Victoria, BC, and University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC. Sun . "Is Mastectomy Superior to Breast-Conserving Treatment for Young Women?". United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.11.032.
@article{osti_20951569,
title = {Is Mastectomy Superior to Breast-Conserving Treatment for Young Women?},
author = {Coulombe, Genevieve and Tyldesley, Scott and Speers, Caroline B.A. and Paltiel, Chuck M.Sc. and Aquino-Parsons, Christina and University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC and Bernstein, Vanessa and University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC and Truong, Pauline T. and Radiation Therapy Program, BCCA, Vancouver Island Centre, Victoria, BC and University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC and Keyes, Mira and University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC and Olivotto, Ivo A. and Radiation Therapy Program, BCCA, Vancouver Island Centre, Victoria, BC and University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To examine whether modified radical mastectomy (MRM) improves outcomes compared with breast-conserving treatment (BCT) in young women. Methods and Materials: Women aged 20-49 years, diagnosed with early breast cancer between 1989 and 1998, were identified. Management with BCT or MRM was compared for local (L), locoregional (LR), and distant relapse-free survival (DRFS) and breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS) by age group (20-39 years, 40-49 years). The analysis was repeated for patients considered 'ideal' candidates for BCT: tumor size {<=}2 cm, pathologically negative axillary nodes, negative margins, and no reported ductal carcinoma in situ. Results: A total of 1,597 women received BCT, and 801 had MRM. After a median follow-up of 9.0 years, the outcomes (L, LR, BCSS) were worse for the younger age group; however, the outcomes were not statistically different by type of local treatment. For women aged 20-39 years considered 'ideal' for BCT, those treated with BCT had slightly lower LRFS compared with those treated with MRM (p = 0.3), but DRFS and BCSS were similar. Conclusions: A difference in LRFS at 10 years potentially favored MRM among women aged 20-39 years considered 'ideal' BCT candidates but was not statistically significant and did not translate into a noticeable difference in DRFS or BCSS. Our data suggest that young age alone is not a contraindication to BCT.},
doi = {10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.11.032},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 5,
volume = 67,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
  • Purpose: To evaluate survival outcomes of young women with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast conservation therapy (BCT) or mastectomy, using a large, population-based database. Methods and Materials: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database, information was obtained for all female patients, ages 20 to 39 years old, diagnosed with T1-2 N0-1 M0 breast cancer between 1990 and 2007, who underwent either BCT (lumpectomy and radiation treatment) or mastectomy. Multivariable and matched pair analyses were performed to compare overall survival (OS) and cause-specific survival (CSS) of patients undergoing BCT and mastectomy. Results: A total of 14,764 women weremore » identified, of whom 45% received BCT and 55% received mastectomy. Median follow-up was 5.7 years (range, 0.5-17.9 years). After we accounted for all patient and tumor characteristics, multivariable analysis found that BCT resulted in OS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.93; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.83-1.04; p = 0.16) and CSS (HR, 0.93; CI, 0.83-1.05; p = 0.26) similar to that of mastectomy. Matched pair analysis, including 4,644 BCT and mastectomy patients, confirmed no difference in OS or CSS: the 5-, 10-, and15-year OS rates for BCT and mastectomy were 92.5%, 83.5%, and 77.0% and 91.9%, 83.6%, and 79.1%, respectively (p = 0.99), and the 5-, 10-, and 15-year CSS rates for BCT and mastectomy were 93.3%, 85.5%, and 79.9% and 92.5%, 85.5%, and 81.9%, respectively (p = 0.88). Conclusions: Our analysis of this population-based database suggests that young women with early-stage breast cancer have similar survival rates whether treated with BCT or mastectomy. These patients should be counseled appropriately regarding their treatment options and should not choose a mastectomy based on the assumption of improved survival.« less
  • Purpose: To determine the incidence and factors associated with the development of arm edema in women who participated in the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) study B-04. Methods and Materials: Between 1971 and 1974, the NSABP protocol B-04 randomized 1,665 eligible patients with resectable breast cancer to either (1) the Halstead-type radical mastectomy; (2) total mastectomy and radiotherapy to the chest wall, axilla, supraclavicular region, and internal mammary nodes if by clinical examination axillary nodes were involved by tumor; and (3) for patients with a clinically uninvolved axilla, a third arm, total mastectomy alone. Measurements of themore » ipsilateral and contralateral arm circumferences were to be performed every 3 months. Results: There was at least one recorded measurement of arm circumferences for 1,457 patients (87.5% of eligible patients). There were 674 women (46.3%) who experienced arm edema at some point during the period of follow-up until February 1976. For radical mastectomy patients, total mastectomy and radiotherapy patients, and total mastectomy patients alone, arm edema was recorded at least once in 58.1%, 38.2%, and 39.1% of patients, respectively (p < .001) and at last recorded measurement in 30.7%, 14.8%, and 15.5%, respectively (p = <.001). Increasing body mass index (BMI) also showed a statistically significant correlation with arm edema at any time (p = .001) and at last assessment (p = .005). Conclusions: Patients who undergo mastectomy, including those whose treatment plans do not include axillary dissection or postoperative radiotherapy, suffer an appreciable incidence of arm edema.« less
  • Purpose: Mastectomy is often recommended for women ≤40 years of age with breast cancer, as young women were under-represented in the landmark trials comparing breast conservation therapy (BCT) to mastectomy. We hypothesized that, in the modern treatment era, BCT and mastectomy result in equivalent local control rates in young women. Methods and Materials: Breast cancer cases arising between 1975 and 2013 in women ≤40 years old were collected from the tumor registries of 2 large healthcare systems in Utah. Kaplan-Meier estimates and Cox proportional hazards models were used to analyze freedom from locoregional recurrence (FFLR), overall survival (OS), and relapse-free survival (RFS).more » Results: This analysis identified 853 BCT candidates. A comparison of BCT to mastectomy after 2000 showed FFLR, RFS, and OS were all similar. Rate for FFLR at 10 years was 94.9% versus 92.1% for BCT and mastectomy, respectively (P=.57). For women whose cancer was diagnosed after 2000, who received BCT, FFLR and RFS rates were improved compared to those whose cancer was diagnosed prior to 2000 (P<.05), whereas OS (P=.46) rates were similar. Among those who underwent mastectomy, FFLR, OS, and RFS were significantly improved (P<.05) with diagnosis after 2000. Conclusions: FFLR rates for young women, ≤40 years of age, have significantly improved for BCT and mastectomy over time. If patients were treated after 2000, BCT appears to be safe and equivalent to mastectomy at 10 years in terms of FFLR, OS, and RFS.« less
  • Purpose: To compare outcomes of salvage mastectomy (SM) and salvage breast-conserving surgery (SBCS) and study the feasibility of SBCS. Methods and Materials: Of 2,038 patients treated with breast-conserving therapy at Yale-New Haven Hospital before 1999, 166 sustained an ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR). Outcomes and prognostic factors of patients treated with SM or SBCS were compared. Patients were considered amenable to SBCS if the recurrence was localized on mammogram and physical examination, and had pathologic size <3 cm, confined to the biopsy site, without skin or lymphovascular invasion, and with {<=}3 positive nodes. Results: Of the 146 patients definitively managedmore » at IBTR, surgery was SM (n = 116) or SBCS (n 30). The median length of follow-up after IBTR was 13.8 years. The SM and SBCS cohorts had no significant differences, except at IBTR the SM cohort had a greater tumor size (p = 0.049). Of the SM cohort, 65.5% were considered appropriate for SBCS, and a localized relapse was predicted by estrogen-receptor positive, diploid, and detection of recurrence by mammogram. Multicentric disease correlated with BRCA1/2 mutation, estrogen-receptor negative, lymph node positive at relapse, and detection of recurrence by physical examination. Survival after IBTR was 64.5% at 10 years, with no significant difference between SM (65.7%) and SBCS (58.0%). Only 2 patients in the SBCS cohort subsequently had a second IBTR, and were salvaged with mastectomy. Conclusions: While mastectomy is considered the standard surgical salvage of IBTR, SBCS is feasible and prognostic factors are related to favorable tumor biology and early detection. Patients with BRCA1/2 germline mutations may be less appropriate for SBCS, as multicentric disease was more prevalent. Patients who underwent SBCS had comparable outcomes as those who underwent SM, but remain at continued risk for IBTR. A prospective trial evaluating repeat lumpectomy and partial breast reirradiation is discussed.« less
  • Purpose: Young women with breast cancer have higher locoregional recurrence (LRR) rates than older patients. The goal of this study is to determine the impact of locoregional treatment strategy, breast-conserving therapy (BCT), mastectomy alone (M), or mastectomy with adjuvant radiation (MXRT), on LRR for patients 35 years or younger. Methods and Materials: Data for 668 breast cancers in 652 young patients with breast cancer were retrospectively reviewed; 197 patients were treated with BCT, 237 with M, and 234 with MXRT. Results: Median follow-up for all living patients was 114 months. In the entire cohort, 10-year actuarial LRR rates varied bymore » locoregional treatment: 19.8% for BCT, 24.1% for M, and 15.1% for MXRT (p = 0.05). In patients with Stage II disease, 10-year actuarial LRR rates by locoregional treatment strategy were 17.7% for BCT, 22.8% for M, and 5.7% for MXRT (p = 0.02). On multivariate analysis, M (hazard ratio, 4.45) and Grade III disease (hazard ratio, 2.24) predicted for increased LRR. In patients with Stage I disease, there was no difference in LRR rates based on locoregional treatment (18.0% for BCT, 19.8% for M; p = 0.56), but chemotherapy use had a statistically significant LRR benefit (13.5% for chemotherapy, 27.9% for none; p = 0.04). Conclusions: Young women have high rates of LRR after breast cancer treatment. For patients with Stage II disease, the best locoregional control rates were achieved with MXRT. For patients with Stage I disease, similar outcomes were achieved with BCT and mastectomy; however, chemotherapy provided a significant benefit to either approach.« less