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Title: Annealing twins in nanocrystalline fcc metals: A molecular dynamics simulation

Abstract

We report fully three-dimensional atomistic molecular dynamics studies of grain growth kinetics in nanocrystalline Cu of 5 nm average grain size. We observe the formation of annealing twins as part of the grain growth process. The grain size and energy evolution was monitored as a function of time for various temperatures, yielding an activation energy for the process. The atomistic mechanism of annealing twin formation from the moving boundaries is described.

Authors:
 [1]; ;  [2]
  1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24060 (United States)
  2. Chemistry, Materials and Life Sciences, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20951410
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. B, Condensed Matter and Materials Physics; Journal Volume: 75; Journal Issue: 18; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevB.75.184111; (c) 2007 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ACTIVATION ENERGY; ANNEALING; COPPER; CRYSTALS; FCC LATTICES; GRAIN GROWTH; GRAIN SIZE; KINETICS; MOLECULAR DYNAMICS METHOD; NANOSTRUCTURES; SIMULATION; SLIP; THREE-DIMENSIONAL CALCULATIONS; TIME DEPENDENCE

Citation Formats

Farkas, Diana, Bringa, Eduardo, and Caro, Alfredo. Annealing twins in nanocrystalline fcc metals: A molecular dynamics simulation. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVB.75.184111.
Farkas, Diana, Bringa, Eduardo, & Caro, Alfredo. Annealing twins in nanocrystalline fcc metals: A molecular dynamics simulation. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVB.75.184111.
Farkas, Diana, Bringa, Eduardo, and Caro, Alfredo. Tue . "Annealing twins in nanocrystalline fcc metals: A molecular dynamics simulation". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVB.75.184111.
@article{osti_20951410,
title = {Annealing twins in nanocrystalline fcc metals: A molecular dynamics simulation},
author = {Farkas, Diana and Bringa, Eduardo and Caro, Alfredo},
abstractNote = {We report fully three-dimensional atomistic molecular dynamics studies of grain growth kinetics in nanocrystalline Cu of 5 nm average grain size. We observe the formation of annealing twins as part of the grain growth process. The grain size and energy evolution was monitored as a function of time for various temperatures, yielding an activation energy for the process. The atomistic mechanism of annealing twin formation from the moving boundaries is described.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVB.75.184111},
journal = {Physical Review. B, Condensed Matter and Materials Physics},
number = 18,
volume = 75,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Tue May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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