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Title: Encapsulation and Diffraction-Pattern-Correction Methods to Reduce the Effect of Damage in X-Ray Diffraction Imaging of Single Biological Molecules

Abstract

Short and intense x-ray pulses may be used for atomic-resolution diffraction imaging of single biological molecules. Radiation damage and a low signal-to-noise ratio impose stringent pulse requirements. In this Letter, we describe methods for decreasing the damage and improving the signal by encapsulating the molecule in a sacrificial layer (tamper) that reduces atomic motion and by postprocessing the pulse-averaged diffraction pattern to correct for ionization damage. Simulations show that these methods greatly improve the image quality.

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)
  2. (Sweden)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20951359
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review Letters; Journal Volume: 98; Journal Issue: 19; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.98.198302; (c) 2007 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; DAMAGE; ENCAPSULATION; IMAGES; IONIZATION; MOLECULES; PULSES; RESOLUTION; SIGNAL-TO-NOISE RATIO; SIGNALS; SIMULATION; X-RAY DIFFRACTION

Citation Formats

Hau-Riege, Stefan P., London, Richard A., Chapman, Henry N., Szoke, Abraham, Timneanu, Nicusor, and Biomedical Center, Uppsala University, Box 576, SE 75123, Uppsala. Encapsulation and Diffraction-Pattern-Correction Methods to Reduce the Effect of Damage in X-Ray Diffraction Imaging of Single Biological Molecules. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVLETT.98.198302.
Hau-Riege, Stefan P., London, Richard A., Chapman, Henry N., Szoke, Abraham, Timneanu, Nicusor, & Biomedical Center, Uppsala University, Box 576, SE 75123, Uppsala. Encapsulation and Diffraction-Pattern-Correction Methods to Reduce the Effect of Damage in X-Ray Diffraction Imaging of Single Biological Molecules. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVLETT.98.198302.
Hau-Riege, Stefan P., London, Richard A., Chapman, Henry N., Szoke, Abraham, Timneanu, Nicusor, and Biomedical Center, Uppsala University, Box 576, SE 75123, Uppsala. Fri . "Encapsulation and Diffraction-Pattern-Correction Methods to Reduce the Effect of Damage in X-Ray Diffraction Imaging of Single Biological Molecules". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVLETT.98.198302.
@article{osti_20951359,
title = {Encapsulation and Diffraction-Pattern-Correction Methods to Reduce the Effect of Damage in X-Ray Diffraction Imaging of Single Biological Molecules},
author = {Hau-Riege, Stefan P. and London, Richard A. and Chapman, Henry N. and Szoke, Abraham and Timneanu, Nicusor and Biomedical Center, Uppsala University, Box 576, SE 75123, Uppsala},
abstractNote = {Short and intense x-ray pulses may be used for atomic-resolution diffraction imaging of single biological molecules. Radiation damage and a low signal-to-noise ratio impose stringent pulse requirements. In this Letter, we describe methods for decreasing the damage and improving the signal by encapsulating the molecule in a sacrificial layer (tamper) that reduces atomic motion and by postprocessing the pulse-averaged diffraction pattern to correct for ionization damage. Simulations show that these methods greatly improve the image quality.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVLETT.98.198302},
journal = {Physical Review Letters},
number = 19,
volume = 98,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri May 11 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Fri May 11 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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