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Title: Film dosimetry calibration method for pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy with an {sup 192}Ir source

Abstract

{sup 192}Ir sources have been widely used in clinical brachytherapy. An important challenge is to perform dosimetric measurements close to the source despite the steep dose gradient. The common, inexpensive silver halide film is a classic two-dimensional integrator dosimeter and would be an attractive solution for these dose measurements. The main disadvantage of film dosimetry is the film response to the low-energy photon. Since the photon energy spectrum is known to vary with depth, the sensitometric curves are expected to be dependent on depth. The purpose of this study is to suggest a correction method for silver halide film dosimetry that overcomes the response changes at different depths. Sensitometric curves have been obtained at different depths with verification film near a 1 Ci {sup 192}Ir pulsed-dose-rate source. The depth dependence of the film response was observed and a correction function was established. The suitability of the method was tested through measurement of the radial dose profile and radial dose function. The results were compared to Monte Carlo-simulated values according to the TG43 formalism. Monte Carlo simulations were performed separately for the beta and gamma source emissions, using the EGS4 code system, including the low-energy photon and electron transport optimization procedures.more » The beta source emission simulation showed that the beta dose contribution could be neglected and therefore the film-depth dependence could not be attributed to this part of the source radioactivity. The gamma source emission simulations included photon-spectra collection at several depths. The results showed a depth-dependent softening of the photon spectrum that can explain the film-energy dependence.« less

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Department of Nuclear Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, POB 653, 84105 Beer-Sheva (Israel)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20951298
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 34; Journal Issue: 5; Other Information: DOI: 10.1118/1.2719366; (c) 2007 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; BETA SOURCES; BRACHYTHERAPY; CALIBRATION; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; DOSE RATES; DOSEMETERS; ENERGY SPECTRA; FILM DOSIMETRY; GAMMA RADIATION; GAMMA SOURCES; IRIDIUM 192; MONTE CARLO METHOD; PHANTOMS; PHOTONS; RADIATION DOSES

Citation Formats

Schwob, Nathan, and Orion, Itzhak. Film dosimetry calibration method for pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy with an {sup 192}Ir source. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1118/1.2719366.
Schwob, Nathan, & Orion, Itzhak. Film dosimetry calibration method for pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy with an {sup 192}Ir source. United States. doi:10.1118/1.2719366.
Schwob, Nathan, and Orion, Itzhak. Tue . "Film dosimetry calibration method for pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy with an {sup 192}Ir source". United States. doi:10.1118/1.2719366.
@article{osti_20951298,
title = {Film dosimetry calibration method for pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy with an {sup 192}Ir source},
author = {Schwob, Nathan and Orion, Itzhak},
abstractNote = {{sup 192}Ir sources have been widely used in clinical brachytherapy. An important challenge is to perform dosimetric measurements close to the source despite the steep dose gradient. The common, inexpensive silver halide film is a classic two-dimensional integrator dosimeter and would be an attractive solution for these dose measurements. The main disadvantage of film dosimetry is the film response to the low-energy photon. Since the photon energy spectrum is known to vary with depth, the sensitometric curves are expected to be dependent on depth. The purpose of this study is to suggest a correction method for silver halide film dosimetry that overcomes the response changes at different depths. Sensitometric curves have been obtained at different depths with verification film near a 1 Ci {sup 192}Ir pulsed-dose-rate source. The depth dependence of the film response was observed and a correction function was established. The suitability of the method was tested through measurement of the radial dose profile and radial dose function. The results were compared to Monte Carlo-simulated values according to the TG43 formalism. Monte Carlo simulations were performed separately for the beta and gamma source emissions, using the EGS4 code system, including the low-energy photon and electron transport optimization procedures. The beta source emission simulation showed that the beta dose contribution could be neglected and therefore the film-depth dependence could not be attributed to this part of the source radioactivity. The gamma source emission simulations included photon-spectra collection at several depths. The results showed a depth-dependent softening of the photon spectrum that can explain the film-energy dependence.},
doi = {10.1118/1.2719366},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 5,
volume = 34,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Tue May 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
  • Purpose: Pulsed-dose-rate (PDR) brachytherapy was originally proposed to combine the therapeutic advantages of high-dose-rate (HDR) and low-dose-rate brachytherapy. Though uncommon in the United States, several facilities employ pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy in Europe and Canada. Currently, there is no air-kerma strength standard for PDR brachytherapy {sup 192}Ir sources traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Discrepancies in clinical measurements of the air-kerma strength of the PDR brachytherapy sources using HDR source-calibrated well chambers warrant further investigation.Methods: In this research, the air-kerma strength for an {sup 192}Ir PDR brachytherapy source was compared with the University of Wisconsin Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratorymore » transfer standard well chambers, the seven-distance technique [B. E. Rasmussen et al., 'The air-kerma strength standard for 192Ir HDR sources,' Med. Phys. 38, 6721-6729 (2011)], and the manufacturer's stated value. Radiochromic film and Monte Carlo techniques were also employed for comparison to the results of the measurements.Results: While the measurements using the seven-distance technique were within + 0.44% from the manufacturer's determination, there was a + 3.10% difference between the transfer standard well chamber measurements and the manufacturer's stated value. Results showed that the PDR brachytherapy source has geometric and thus radiological qualities that exhibit behaviors similar to a point source model in contrast to a conventional line source model.Conclusions: The resulting effect of the pointlike characteristics of the PDR brachytherapy source likely account for the differences observed between well chamber and in-air measurements.« less
  • The goal of this work was to calculate the dose distribution around a high dose-rate {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source using a multi-group discrete ordinates code and then to compare the results with a Monte Carlo calculated dose distribution. The unstructured tetrahedral mesh discrete ordinates code Attila version 6.1.1 was used to calculate the photon kerma rate distribution in water around the Nucletron microSelectron mHDRv2 source. MCNPX 2.5.c was used to compute the Monte Carlo water photon kerma rate distribution. Two hundred million histories were simulated, resulting in standard errors of the mean of less than 3% overall. The number ofmore » energy groups, S{sub n} (angular order), P{sub n} (scattering order), and mesh elements were varied in addition to the method of analytic ray tracing to assess their effects on the deterministic solution. Water photon kerma rate matrices were exported from both codes into an in-house data analysis software. This software quantified the percent dose difference distribution, the number of points within {+-}3% and {+-}5%, and the mean percent difference between the two codes. The data demonstrated that a 5 energy-group cross-section set calculated results to within 0.5% of a 15 group cross-section set. S{sub 12} was sufficient to resolve the solution in angle. P{sub 2} expansion of the scattering cross-section was necessary to compute accurate distributions. A computational mesh with 55 064 tetrahedral elements in a 30 cm diameter phantom resolved the solution spatially. An efficiency factor of 110 with the above parameters was realized in comparison to MC methods. The Attila code provided an accurate and efficient solution of the Boltzmann transport equation for the mHDRv2 source.« less
  • Purpose: In order to facilitate a smooth transition for brachytherapy dose calculations from the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Task Group No. 43 (TG-43) formalism to model-based dose calculation algorithms (MBDCAs), treatment planning systems (TPSs) using a MBDCA require a set of well-defined test case plans characterized by Monte Carlo (MC) methods. This also permits direct dose comparison to TG-43 reference data. Such test case plans should be made available for use in the software commissioning process performed by clinical end users. To this end, a hypothetical, generic high-dose rate (HDR) {sup 192}Ir source and a virtual watermore » phantom were designed, which can be imported into a TPS. Methods: A hypothetical, generic HDR {sup 192}Ir source was designed based on commercially available sources as well as a virtual, cubic water phantom that can be imported into any TPS in DICOM format. The dose distribution of the generic {sup 192}Ir source when placed at the center of the cubic phantom, and away from the center under altered scatter conditions, was evaluated using two commercial MBDCAs [Oncentra{sup ®} Brachy with advanced collapsed-cone engine (ACE) and BrachyVision ACUROS{sup TM}]. Dose comparisons were performed using state-of-the-art MC codes for radiation transport, including ALGEBRA, BrachyDose, GEANT4, MCNP5, MCNP6, and PENELOPE2008. The methodologies adhered to recommendations in the AAPM TG-229 report on high-energy brachytherapy source dosimetry. TG-43 dosimetry parameters, an along-away dose-rate table, and primary and scatter separated (PSS) data were obtained. The virtual water phantom of (201){sup 3} voxels (1 mm sides) was used to evaluate the calculated dose distributions. Two test case plans involving a single position of the generic HDR {sup 192}Ir source in this phantom were prepared: (i) source centered in the phantom and (ii) source displaced 7 cm laterally from the center. Datasets were independently produced by different investigators. MC results were then compared against dose calculated using TG-43 and MBDCA methods. Results: TG-43 and PSS datasets were generated for the generic source, the PSS data for use with the ACE algorithm. The dose-rate constant values obtained from seven MC simulations, performed independently using different codes, were in excellent agreement, yielding an average of 1.1109 ± 0.0004 cGy/(h U) (k = 1, Type A uncertainty). MC calculated dose-rate distributions for the two plans were also found to be in excellent agreement, with differences within type A uncertainties. Differences between commercial MBDCA and MC results were test, position, and calculation parameter dependent. On average, however, these differences were within 1% for ACUROS and 2% for ACE at clinically relevant distances. Conclusions: A hypothetical, generic HDR {sup 192}Ir source was designed and implemented in two commercially available TPSs employing different MBDCAs. Reference dose distributions for this source were benchmarked and used for the evaluation of MBDCA calculations employing a virtual, cubic water phantom in the form of a CT DICOM image series. The implementation of a generic source of identical design in all TPSs using MBDCAs is an important step toward supporting univocal commissioning procedures and direct comparisons between TPSs.« less
  • Reported MOSFET measurements concern mostly external radiotherapy and in vivo dosimetry. In this paper, we apply the technique for absolute dosimetry in the context of HDR brachytherapy using an {sup 192}Ir source. Measured radial dose rate distributions in water for different planes perpendicular to the source axis are presented and special attention is paid to the calibration of the R and K type detectors, and to the determination of appropriate correction factors for the sensitivity variation with the increase of the threshold voltage and the energy dependence. The experimental results are compared with Monte Carlo simulated dose rate distributions. Themore » experimental results show a good agreement with the Monte Carlo simulations: the discrepancy between experimental and Monte Carlo results being within 5% for 82% of the points and within 10% for 95% of the points. Moreover, all points except two are found to lie within the experimental uncertainties, confirming thereby the quality of the results obtained.« less
  • Purpose: The aim of this work was to create a mailable phantom with measurement accuracy suitable for Radiological Physics Center (RPC) audits of high dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy sources at institutions participating in National Cancer Institute-funded cooperative clinical trials. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) were chosen as the dosimeter to be used with the phantom.Methods: The authors designed and built an 8 × 8 × 10 cm{sup 3} prototype phantom that had two slots capable of holding Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C OSLDs (nanoDots; Landauer, Glenwood, IL) and a single channel capable of accepting all {sup 192}Ir HDR brachytherapy sources in current clinicalmore » use in the United States. The authors irradiated the phantom with Nucletron and Varian {sup 192}Ir HDR sources in order to determine correction factors for linearity with dose and the combined effects of irradiation energy and phantom characteristics. The phantom was then sent to eight institutions which volunteered to perform trial remote audits.Results: The linearity correction factor was k{sub L}= (−9.43 × 10{sup −5}× dose) + 1.009, where dose is in cGy, which differed from that determined by the RPC for the same batch of dosimeters using {sup 60}Co irradiation. Separate block correction factors were determined for current versions of both Nucletron and Varian {sup 192}Ir HDR sources and these vendor-specific correction factors differed by almost 2.6%. For the Nucletron source, the correction factor was 1.026 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.023–1.028], and for the Varian source, it was 1.000 (95% CI = 0.995–1.005). Variations in lateral source positioning up to 0.8 mm and distal/proximal source positioning up to 10 mm had minimal effect on dose measurement accuracy. The overall dose measurement uncertainty of the system was estimated to be 2.4% and 2.5% for the Nucletron and Varian sources, respectively (95% CI). This uncertainty was sufficient to establish a ±5% acceptance criterion for source strength audits under a formal RPC audit program. Trial audits of four Nucletron sources and four Varian sources revealed an average RPC-to-institution dose ratio of 1.000 (standard deviation = 0.011).Conclusions: The authors have created an OSLD-based {sup 192}Ir HDR brachytherapy source remote audit tool which offers sufficient dose measurement accuracy to allow the RPC to establish a remote audit program with a ±5% acceptance criterion. The feasibility of the system has been demonstrated with eight trial audits to date.« less