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Title: Growth-Induced Instability in Metabolic Networks

Abstract

Product-feedback inhibition is a ubiquitous regulatory scheme for maintaining homeostasis in living cells. Individual metabolic pathways with product-feedback inhibition are stable as long as one pathway step is rate limiting. However, pathways are often coupled both by the use of a common substrate and by stoichiometric utilization of their products for cell growth. We show that such a coupled network with product-feedback inhibition may exhibit limit-cycle oscillations which arise via a Hopf bifurcation. Our results highlight novel evolutionary constraints on the architecture of metabolism.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Department of Physics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)
  2. Department of Molecular Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20951198
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review Letters; Journal Volume: 98; Journal Issue: 13; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.98.138105; (c) 2007 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; ANIMAL GROWTH; BIFURCATION; BIOLOGICAL PATHWAYS; FEEDBACK; HOMEOSTASIS; INSTABILITY; LIMIT CYCLE; METABOLISM; OSCILLATIONS; STOICHIOMETRY; SUBSTRATES

Citation Formats

Goyal, Sidhartha, and Wingreen, Ned S. Growth-Induced Instability in Metabolic Networks. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVLETT.98.138105.
Goyal, Sidhartha, & Wingreen, Ned S. Growth-Induced Instability in Metabolic Networks. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVLETT.98.138105.
Goyal, Sidhartha, and Wingreen, Ned S. Fri . "Growth-Induced Instability in Metabolic Networks". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVLETT.98.138105.
@article{osti_20951198,
title = {Growth-Induced Instability in Metabolic Networks},
author = {Goyal, Sidhartha and Wingreen, Ned S.},
abstractNote = {Product-feedback inhibition is a ubiquitous regulatory scheme for maintaining homeostasis in living cells. Individual metabolic pathways with product-feedback inhibition are stable as long as one pathway step is rate limiting. However, pathways are often coupled both by the use of a common substrate and by stoichiometric utilization of their products for cell growth. We show that such a coupled network with product-feedback inhibition may exhibit limit-cycle oscillations which arise via a Hopf bifurcation. Our results highlight novel evolutionary constraints on the architecture of metabolism.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVLETT.98.138105},
journal = {Physical Review Letters},
number = 13,
volume = 98,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Mar 30 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Fri Mar 30 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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