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Title: Observation of Kinetic Plasma Jets in a Coronal-Loop Simulation Experiment

Abstract

Under certain conditions an intense kinetic plasma jet is observed to emerge from the apex of laboratory simulations of coronal plasma loops. Analytic and numerical models show that these jets result from a particle orbit instability in a helical magnetic field whereby magnetic forces radially eject rather than confine ions with sufficiently large countercurrent axial velocity.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Applied Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20951190
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review Letters; Journal Volume: 98; Journal Issue: 13; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.98.135002; (c) 2007 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; INSTABILITY; MAGNETIC FIELDS; ORBITS; PLASMA; PLASMA JETS; SIMULATION

Citation Formats

Tripathi, S. K. P., Bellan, P. M., and Yun, G. S.. Observation of Kinetic Plasma Jets in a Coronal-Loop Simulation Experiment. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVLETT.98.135002.
Tripathi, S. K. P., Bellan, P. M., & Yun, G. S.. Observation of Kinetic Plasma Jets in a Coronal-Loop Simulation Experiment. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVLETT.98.135002.
Tripathi, S. K. P., Bellan, P. M., and Yun, G. S.. Fri . "Observation of Kinetic Plasma Jets in a Coronal-Loop Simulation Experiment". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVLETT.98.135002.
@article{osti_20951190,
title = {Observation of Kinetic Plasma Jets in a Coronal-Loop Simulation Experiment},
author = {Tripathi, S. K. P. and Bellan, P. M. and Yun, G. S.},
abstractNote = {Under certain conditions an intense kinetic plasma jet is observed to emerge from the apex of laboratory simulations of coronal plasma loops. Analytic and numerical models show that these jets result from a particle orbit instability in a helical magnetic field whereby magnetic forces radially eject rather than confine ions with sufficiently large countercurrent axial velocity.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVLETT.98.135002},
journal = {Physical Review Letters},
number = 13,
volume = 98,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Mar 30 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Fri Mar 30 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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