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Title: Rodent brain imaging with SPECT/CT

Abstract

We evaluated methods of imaging rat models of stroke in vivo using a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system dedicated to small animal imaging (X-SPECT{sup TM}, Gamma Medica-Ideas, Northridge, CA). An animal model of ischemic stroke was developed for in vivo SPECT/CT imaging using the middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) technique. The presence of cerebral ischemia was verified in ex vivo studies using triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining. In vivo radionuclide imaging of cerebral blood flow was performed in rats following MCAO using dynamic planar imaging of {sup 99m}Tc-exametazime with parallel hole collimation. This was followed immediately by in vivo radionuclide imaging of cerebral blood flow with {sup 99m}Tc-exametazime in the same animals using 1-mm pinhole SPECT. Correlated computed tomography imaging was performed to localize radiopharmaceutical uptake. The animals were allowed to recover and ex vivo autoradiography was performed with separate administration of {sup 99m}Tc-exametazime. Time activity curve of {sup 99m}Tc-exametazime showed that the radiopharmaceutical uptake could be maintained for over 9 min. The activity would be expected to be relatively stable for a much longer period, although the data were only obtained for 9 min. TTC staining revealed sizable infarcts by visual observation of inexistence of TTC stain inmore » infracted tissues of MCAO rat brains. In vivo SPECT imaging showed cerebral blood flow deficit in the MCAO model, and the in vivo imaging result was confirmed with ex vivo autoradiography. We have demonstrated a capability of imaging regions of cerebral blood flow deficit in MCAO rat brains in vivo using a pinhole SPECT dedicated to small animal imaging.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Department of Radiology, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20951143
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 34; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: DOI: 10.1118/1.2710950; (c) 2007 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; AUTORADIOGRAPHY; BLOOD FLOW; BRAIN; CEREBRAL ARTERIES; CHLORIDES; COLLIMATORS; IN VIVO; ISCHEMIA; RADIOPHARMACEUTICALS; RATS; SINGLE PHOTON EMISSION COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY; TECHNETIUM 99; UPTAKE

Citation Formats

Seo, Youngho, Gao, D.-W., Hasegawa, Bruce H., Dae, Michael W., and Franc, Benjamin L. Rodent brain imaging with SPECT/CT. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1118/1.2710950.
Seo, Youngho, Gao, D.-W., Hasegawa, Bruce H., Dae, Michael W., & Franc, Benjamin L. Rodent brain imaging with SPECT/CT. United States. doi:10.1118/1.2710950.
Seo, Youngho, Gao, D.-W., Hasegawa, Bruce H., Dae, Michael W., and Franc, Benjamin L. Sun . "Rodent brain imaging with SPECT/CT". United States. doi:10.1118/1.2710950.
@article{osti_20951143,
title = {Rodent brain imaging with SPECT/CT},
author = {Seo, Youngho and Gao, D.-W. and Hasegawa, Bruce H. and Dae, Michael W. and Franc, Benjamin L.},
abstractNote = {We evaluated methods of imaging rat models of stroke in vivo using a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system dedicated to small animal imaging (X-SPECT{sup TM}, Gamma Medica-Ideas, Northridge, CA). An animal model of ischemic stroke was developed for in vivo SPECT/CT imaging using the middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) technique. The presence of cerebral ischemia was verified in ex vivo studies using triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining. In vivo radionuclide imaging of cerebral blood flow was performed in rats following MCAO using dynamic planar imaging of {sup 99m}Tc-exametazime with parallel hole collimation. This was followed immediately by in vivo radionuclide imaging of cerebral blood flow with {sup 99m}Tc-exametazime in the same animals using 1-mm pinhole SPECT. Correlated computed tomography imaging was performed to localize radiopharmaceutical uptake. The animals were allowed to recover and ex vivo autoradiography was performed with separate administration of {sup 99m}Tc-exametazime. Time activity curve of {sup 99m}Tc-exametazime showed that the radiopharmaceutical uptake could be maintained for over 9 min. The activity would be expected to be relatively stable for a much longer period, although the data were only obtained for 9 min. TTC staining revealed sizable infarcts by visual observation of inexistence of TTC stain in infracted tissues of MCAO rat brains. In vivo SPECT imaging showed cerebral blood flow deficit in the MCAO model, and the in vivo imaging result was confirmed with ex vivo autoradiography. We have demonstrated a capability of imaging regions of cerebral blood flow deficit in MCAO rat brains in vivo using a pinhole SPECT dedicated to small animal imaging.},
doi = {10.1118/1.2710950},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 4,
volume = 34,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Sun Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
  • Contrast enhanced MRI is valuable in predicting the histologic grade of gliomas. However, some high grade tumors may not demonstrate any significant enhancement. The purpose of this study was to assess the contribution of Tl-201 brain SPECT in the grading of preoperative glioma and the correlation with contrast enhancement in MRI or CT. The subjects consisted of 30 patients(pts) with suspected gliomas on contrast enhanced MR(n=27) or CT(n=3). Tl-201 brain SPECT was performed after injection of 74MBq of Tl-201 using triple head SPECT system. To quantify Tl-201 uptake, Tl indices (Tl average pixel counts of tumor ROl/normal contralateral hemisphere) weremore » obtained. Histologic diagnoses were glioblastoma multiforme(GM) in 13, asrtrocytoma grade III (GIII) in 7, astrocytoma grade II(GII) in 6 and reactive gliosis(RG) in 4. All 13 pts with GM showed positive Tl-201 uptake(mean Tl; 9.0 {plus_minus}4.7), when Tl over 2.5 was considered as positive. Four of the 7 pts with GIII were positive(Tl: 4.6 {approximately}8.5) and the other 3 pts were negative. Tl-201 uptake(Tl; 0.8{approximately}1.5). All with GII showed negative Tl-201 uptake except one with 4.7 of Tl. Three of the 4 pts with RG also showed negative Tl-201 uptake and one showed positive uptake(Tl; 4.9). Overall sensitivity and specificity of Tl-201 SPECT in differentiating high grade glioma were 85% and 80%. In the correlation with contrast enhancement in MRI or CT, all nonenhancing lesions were negative Tl-201 uptake including 2 lesions with GIII. Nineteen out of the 23 pts with enhancing lesions had positive Tl-201 uptake. Three pts with RG and one with GIII who had enhancing lesions in MRI showed negative Tl-201 uptake. In conclusion, Tl-201 brain SPECT imaging is a useful method in differentiating the high grade gliomas in contrast enhancing lesions in MRI or CT. It has no additional value in differential diagnosis of nonenhancing lesions.« less
  • While quantitation is the norm in PET, it is not widely available yet in SPECT. This work's aim was to calibrate a commercially available SPECT/CT system to perform quantitative SPECT. Counting sensitivity, dead-time (DT) constant and partial volume effect (PVE) of the system were assessed. A dual-head Siemens SymbiaT6 SPECT/CT camera equipped with low energy high-resolution collimators was studied. {sup 99m}Tc was the radioisotope of interest because of its wide usage in nuclear medicine. First, point source acquisitions were performed (activity: 30–990MBq). Further acquisitions were then performed with a uniform Jaszczak phantom filled with water at high activity (25–5000MBq). PVEmore » was studied using 6 hot spheres (diameters: 9.9–31.2 mm) filled with {sup 99m}Tc (2.8MBq/cc) in the Jaszczak phantom, which was: (1) empty, (2) water-filled and (3) water-filled with low activity (0.1MBq/cc). The data was reconstructed with the Siemens's Flash3D iterative algorithm with 4 subsets and 8 iterations, attenuation-correction (AC) and scatter-correction (SC). DT modelling was based on the total spectrum counting rate. Sensitivity was assessed using AC-SC reconstructed SPECT data. Sensitivity and DT for the sources were 99.51±1.46cps/MBq and 0.60±0.04µs. For the phantom, sensitivity and DT were 109.9±2.3cps/MBq and 0.62±0.13µs. The recovery-coefficient varied from 5% for the 9.9mm, to 80% for the 31.2mm spheres. With our calibration methods, both sensitivity and DT constant of the SPECT camera had little dependence on the object geometry and attenuation. For small objects of known size, recovery-coefficient can be applied to correct PVE. Clinical quantitative SPECT appears to be possible and has many potential applications.« less
  • Hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) chemotherapy is effective for treating primary and metastatic carcinoma of the liver. We compared the perfusion patterns of HAI chemotherapy on intra-arterial port-catheter computed tomography (iapc-CT) and fused images obtained with a combined single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) system. We studied 28 patients with primary or metastatic carcinoma of the liver who bore an implantable HAI port system. All underwent abdominal SPECT using Tc-99m-MAA (185 Mbq); the injection rate was 1 mL/min, identical to the chemotherapy infusion rate, and 0.5 mL/sec for iapc-CT. Delivery was through an implantable port. We compared the intrahepatic perfusion (IHP)more » and extrahepatic perfusion (EHP) patterns of HAI chemotherapy on iapc-CT images and fused images obtained with a combined SPECT/CT system. In 23 of 28 patients (82%), IHP patterns on iapc-CT images and fused images were identical. In 5 of the 28 patients (18%), IHP on fusion images was different from IHP on iapc-CT images. EHP was seen on fused images in 12 of the 28 patients (43%) and on iapc-CT images in 8 patients (29%). In 17 patients (61%), upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed gastroduodenal mucosal lesions. EHP was revealed on fused images in 10 of these patients; 9 of them manifested gastroduodenal toxicity at the time of subsequent HAI chemotherapy. Fusion imaging using the combined SPECT/CT system reflects the actual distribution of the infused anticancer agent. This information is valuable not only for monitoring adequate drug distribution but also for avoiding potential extrahepatic complications.« less
  • Purpose: This paper evaluates the effects of computed tomography (CT) image noise and artifacts on quantitative single-photon emission computed-tomography (SPECT) imaging, with the aim of establishing an appropriate range of CT acquisition parameters for low-dose protocols with respect to accurate SPECT attenuation correction (AC). Methods: SPECT images of two geometric and one anthropomorphic phantom were reconstructed iteratively using CT scans acquired at a range of dose levels (CTDI{sub vol} = 0.4 to 46 mGy). Resultant SPECT image quality was evaluated by comparing mean signal, background noise, and artifacts to SPECT images reconstructed using the highest dose CT for AC. Noisemore » injection was performed on linear-attenuation (μ) maps to determine the CT noise threshold for accurate AC. Results: High levels of CT noise (σ ∼ 200–400 HU) resulted in low μ-maps noise (σ ∼ 1%–3%). Noise levels greater than ∼10% in 140 keV μ-maps were required to produce visibly perceptible increases of ∼15% in {sup 99m}Tc SPECT images. These noise levels would be achieved at low CT dose levels (CTDI{sub vol} = 4 μGy) that are over 2 orders of magnitude lower than the minimum dose for diagnostic CT scanners. CT noise could also lower (bias) the expected μ values. The relative error in reconstructed SPECT signal trended linearly with the relative shift in μ. SPECT signal was, on average, underestimated in regions corresponding with beam-hardening artifacts in CT images. Any process that has the potential to change the CT number of a region by ∼100 HU (e.g., misregistration between CT images and SPECT images due to motion, the presence of contrast in CT images) could introduce errors in μ{sub 140} {sub keV} on the order of 10%, that in turn, could introduce errors on the order of ∼10% into the reconstructed {sup 99m}Tc SPECT image. Conclusions: The impact of CT noise on SPECT noise was demonstrated to be negligible for clinically achievable CT parameters. Because CT dose levels that affect SPECT quantification is low (CTDI{sub vol} ∼ 4 μGy), the low dose limit for the CT exam as part of SPECT/CT will be guided by CT image quality requirements for anatomical localization and artifact reduction. A CT technique with higher kVp in combination with lower mAs is recommended when low-dose CT images are used for AC to minimize beam-hardening artifacts.« less
  • Purpose: To assess radiation dose from the cone beam CT (CBCT) component of SPECT/CT studies and to compare with other CT examinations performed in our institution. Methods: We used an anthropomorphic chest phantom and the 6 cc ion chamber to measure entrance breast dose for several CBCT and diagnostic CT acquisition protocols. The CBCT effective dose was calculated with ImPACT software; the CT effective dose was evaluated from the DLP value and conversion factor, dependent on the anatomic region. The RADAR medical procedure radiation dose calculator was used to assess the nuclear medicine component of exam dose. Results: The entrancemore » dose to the breast measured with the anthropomorphic phantom was 0.48 mGy and 9.41 mGy for cardiac and chest CBCT scans; and 4.59 mGy for diagnostic thoracic CT. The effective doses were 0.2 mSv, 3.2 mSv and 2.8 mSv respectively. For a small patient represented by the anthropomorphic phantom, the dose from the diagnostic CT was lower than from the CBCT scan, as a result of the exposure reduction options available on modern CT scanners. The CBCT protocols used the same fixed scanning techniques. The diagnostic CT dose based on the patient data was 35% higher than the phantom dose. For most SPECT/CT studies the dose from the CBCT component was comparable with the dose from the radiopharmaceutical. Conclusions: The patient radiation dose from the cone beam CT scan can be higher than that from a diagnostic CT and should be taken into consideration in evaluating total SPECT/CT patient dose.« less