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Title: An anatomically realistic lung model for Monte Carlo-based dose calculations

Abstract

Treatment planning for disease sites with large variations of electron density in neighboring tissues requires an accurate description of the geometry. This self-evident statement is especially true for the lung, a highly complex organ having structures with a wide range of sizes that range from about 10{sup -4} to 1 cm. In treatment planning, the lung is commonly modeled by a voxelized geometry obtained using computed tomography (CT) data at various resolutions. The simplest such model, which is often used for QA and validation work, is the atomic mix or mean density model, in which the entire lung is homogenized and given a mean (volume-averaged) density. The purpose of this paper is (i) to describe a new heterogeneous random lung model, which is based on morphological data of the human lung, and (ii) use this model to assess the differences in dose calculations between an actual lung (as represented by our model) and a mean density (homogenized) lung. Eventually, we plan to use the random lung model to assess the accuracy of CT-based treatment plans of the lung. For this paper, we have used Monte Carlo methods to make accurate comparisons between dose calculations for the random lung model andmore » the mean density model. For four realizations of the random lung model, we used a single photon beam, with two different energies (6 and 18 MV) and four field sizes (1x1, 5x5, 10x10, and 20x20 cm{sup 2}). We found a maximum difference of 34% of D{sub max} with the 1x1, 18 MV beam along the central axis (CAX). A ''shadow'' region distal to the lung, with dose reduction up to 7% of D{sub max}, exists for the same realization. The dose perturbations decrease for larger field sizes, but the magnitude of the differences in the shadow region is nearly independent of the field size. We also observe that, compared to the mean density model, the random structures inside the heterogeneous lung can alter the shape of the isodose lines, leading to a broadening or shrinking of the penumbra region. For small field sizes, the mean lung doses significantly depend on the structures' relative locations to the beam. In addition to these comparisons between the random lung and mean density models, we also provide a preliminary comparison between dose calculations for the random lung model and a voxelized version of this model at 0.4x0.4x0.4 cm{sup 3} resolution. Overall, this study is relevant to treatment planning for lung tumors, especially in situations where small field sizes are used. Our results show that for such situations, the mean density model of the lung is inadequate, and a more accurate CT model of the lung is required. Future work with our model will involve patient motion, setup errors, and recommendations for the resolution of CT models.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2104 (United States)
  2. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20951091
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 34; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: DOI: 10.1118/1.2437284; (c) 2007 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ACCURACY; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; DOSIMETRY; ELECTRON DENSITY; ERRORS; LUNGS; MONTE CARLO METHOD; NEOPLASMS; PATIENTS; PHOTON BEAMS; PLANNING; RADIATION DOSES; RECOMMENDATIONS; SPATIAL RESOLUTION; VALIDATION

Citation Formats

Liang Liang, Larsen, Edward W., Chetty, Indrin J., and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska 68198-7521. An anatomically realistic lung model for Monte Carlo-based dose calculations. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1118/1.2437284.
Liang Liang, Larsen, Edward W., Chetty, Indrin J., & Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska 68198-7521. An anatomically realistic lung model for Monte Carlo-based dose calculations. United States. doi:10.1118/1.2437284.
Liang Liang, Larsen, Edward W., Chetty, Indrin J., and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska 68198-7521. Thu . "An anatomically realistic lung model for Monte Carlo-based dose calculations". United States. doi:10.1118/1.2437284.
@article{osti_20951091,
title = {An anatomically realistic lung model for Monte Carlo-based dose calculations},
author = {Liang Liang and Larsen, Edward W. and Chetty, Indrin J. and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska 68198-7521},
abstractNote = {Treatment planning for disease sites with large variations of electron density in neighboring tissues requires an accurate description of the geometry. This self-evident statement is especially true for the lung, a highly complex organ having structures with a wide range of sizes that range from about 10{sup -4} to 1 cm. In treatment planning, the lung is commonly modeled by a voxelized geometry obtained using computed tomography (CT) data at various resolutions. The simplest such model, which is often used for QA and validation work, is the atomic mix or mean density model, in which the entire lung is homogenized and given a mean (volume-averaged) density. The purpose of this paper is (i) to describe a new heterogeneous random lung model, which is based on morphological data of the human lung, and (ii) use this model to assess the differences in dose calculations between an actual lung (as represented by our model) and a mean density (homogenized) lung. Eventually, we plan to use the random lung model to assess the accuracy of CT-based treatment plans of the lung. For this paper, we have used Monte Carlo methods to make accurate comparisons between dose calculations for the random lung model and the mean density model. For four realizations of the random lung model, we used a single photon beam, with two different energies (6 and 18 MV) and four field sizes (1x1, 5x5, 10x10, and 20x20 cm{sup 2}). We found a maximum difference of 34% of D{sub max} with the 1x1, 18 MV beam along the central axis (CAX). A ''shadow'' region distal to the lung, with dose reduction up to 7% of D{sub max}, exists for the same realization. The dose perturbations decrease for larger field sizes, but the magnitude of the differences in the shadow region is nearly independent of the field size. We also observe that, compared to the mean density model, the random structures inside the heterogeneous lung can alter the shape of the isodose lines, leading to a broadening or shrinking of the penumbra region. For small field sizes, the mean lung doses significantly depend on the structures' relative locations to the beam. In addition to these comparisons between the random lung and mean density models, we also provide a preliminary comparison between dose calculations for the random lung model and a voxelized version of this model at 0.4x0.4x0.4 cm{sup 3} resolution. Overall, this study is relevant to treatment planning for lung tumors, especially in situations where small field sizes are used. Our results show that for such situations, the mean density model of the lung is inadequate, and a more accurate CT model of the lung is required. Future work with our model will involve patient motion, setup errors, and recommendations for the resolution of CT models.},
doi = {10.1118/1.2437284},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 3,
volume = 34,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Mar 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Thu Mar 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
  • Purpose : To investigate the effects of the composition and geometry of ocular media and tissues surrounding the eye on dose distributions for COMS eye plaque brachytherapy with{sup 125}I, {sup 103}Pd, or {sup 131}Cs seeds, and to investigate doses to ocular structures. Methods : An anatomically and compositionally realistic voxelized eye model with a medial tumor is developed based on a literature review. Mass energy absorption and attenuation coefficients for ocular media are calculated. Radiation transport and dose deposition are simulated using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo user-code BrachyDose for a fully loaded COMS eye plaque within a water phantom andmore » our full eye model for the three radionuclides. A TG-43 simulation with the same seed configuration in a water phantom neglecting the plaque and interseed effects is also performed. The impact on dose distributions of varying tumor position, as well as tumor and surrounding tissue media is investigated. Each simulation and radionuclide is compared using isodose contours, dose volume histograms for the lens and tumor, maximum, minimum, and average doses to structures of interest, and doses to voxels of interest within the eye. Results : Mass energy absorption and attenuation coefficients of the ocular media differ from those of water by as much as 12% within the 20–30 keV photon energy range. For all radionuclides studied, average doses to the tumor and lens regions in the full eye model differ from those for the plaque in water by 8%–10% and 13%–14%, respectively; the average doses to the tumor and lens regions differ between the full eye model and the TG-43 simulation by 2%–17% and 29%–34%, respectively. Replacing the surrounding tissues in the eye model with water increases the maximum and average doses to the lens by 2% and 3%, respectively. Substituting the tumor medium in the eye model for water, soft tissue, or an alternate melanoma composition affects tumor dose compared to the default eye model simulation by up to 16%. In the full eye model simulations, the average dose to the lens is larger by 7%–9% than the dose to the center of the lens, and the maximum dose to the optic nerve is 17%–22% higher than the dose to the optic disk for all radionuclides. In general, when normalized to the same prescription dose at the tumor apex, doses delivered to all structures of interest in the full eye model are lowest for{sup 103}Pd and highest for {sup 131}Cs, except for the tumor where the average dose is highest for {sup 103}Pd and lowest for {sup 131}Cs. Conclusions : The eye is not radiologically water-equivalent, as doses from simulations of the plaque in the full eye model differ considerably from doses for the plaque in a water phantom and from simulated TG-43 calculated doses. This demonstrates the importance of model-based dose calculations for eye plaque brachytherapy, for which accurate elemental compositions of ocular media are necessary.« less
  • Purpose : To investigate the effects of the composition and geometry of ocular media and tissues surrounding the eye on dose distributions for COMS eye plaque brachytherapy with{sup 125}I, {sup 103}Pd, or {sup 131}Cs seeds, and to investigate doses to ocular structures. Methods : An anatomically and compositionally realistic voxelized eye model with a medial tumor is developed based on a literature review. Mass energy absorption and attenuation coefficients for ocular media are calculated. Radiation transport and dose deposition are simulated using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo user-code BrachyDose for a fully loaded COMS eye plaque within a water phantom andmore » our full eye model for the three radionuclides. A TG-43 simulation with the same seed configuration in a water phantom neglecting the plaque and interseed effects is also performed. The impact on dose distributions of varying tumor position, as well as tumor and surrounding tissue media is investigated. Each simulation and radionuclide is compared using isodose contours, dose volume histograms for the lens and tumor, maximum, minimum, and average doses to structures of interest, and doses to voxels of interest within the eye. Results : Mass energy absorption and attenuation coefficients of the ocular media differ from those of water by as much as 12% within the 20–30 keV photon energy range. For all radionuclides studied, average doses to the tumor and lens regions in the full eye model differ from those for the plaque in water by 8%–10% and 13%–14%, respectively; the average doses to the tumor and lens regions differ between the full eye model and the TG-43 simulation by 2%–17% and 29%–34%, respectively. Replacing the surrounding tissues in the eye model with water increases the maximum and average doses to the lens by 2% and 3%, respectively. Substituting the tumor medium in the eye model for water, soft tissue, or an alternate melanoma composition affects tumor dose compared to the default eye model simulation by up to 16%. In the full eye model simulations, the average dose to the lens is larger by 7%–9% than the dose to the center of the lens, and the maximum dose to the optic nerve is 17%–22% higher than the dose to the optic disk for all radionuclides. In general, when normalized to the same prescription dose at the tumor apex, doses delivered to all structures of interest in the full eye model are lowest for{sup 103}Pd and highest for {sup 131}Cs, except for the tumor where the average dose is highest for {sup 103}Pd and lowest for {sup 131}Cs. Conclusions : The eye is not radiologically water-equivalent, as doses from simulations of the plaque in the full eye model differ considerably from doses for the plaque in a water phantom and from simulated TG-43 calculated doses. This demonstrates the importance of model-based dose calculations for eye plaque brachytherapy, for which accurate elemental compositions of ocular media are necessary.« less
  • Purpose: Commonly used radiopharmaceuticals were tested to define the most important dosimetric factors in preclinical studies. Dosimetric calculations were applied in two different whole-body mouse models, with varying organ size, so as to determine their impact on absorbed doses and S-values. Organ mass influence was evaluated with computational models and Monte Carlo(MC) simulations. Methods: MC simulations were executed on GATE to determine dose distribution in the 4D digital MOBY mouse phantom. Two mouse models, 28 and 34 g respectively, were constructed based on realistic preclinical exams to calculate the absorbed doses and S-values of five commonly used radionuclides in SPECT/PETmore » studies (18F, 68Ga, 177Lu, 111In and 99mTc).Radionuclide biodistributions were obtained from literature. Realistic statistics (uncertainty lower than 4.5%) were acquired using the standard physical model in Geant4. Comparisons of the dosimetric calculations on the two different phantoms for each radiopharmaceutical are presented. Results: Dose per organ in mGy was calculated for all radiopharmaceuticals. The two models introduced a difference of 0.69% in their brain masses, while the largest differences were observed in the marrow 18.98% and in the thyroid 18.65% masses.Furthermore, S-values of the most important target-organs were calculated for each isotope. Source-organ was selected to be the whole mouse body.Differences on the S-factors were observed in the 6.0–30.0% range. Tables with all the calculations as reference dosimetric data were developed. Conclusion: Accurate dose per organ and the most appropriate S-values are derived for specific preclinical studies. The impact of the mouse model size is rather high (up to 30% for a 17.65% difference in the total mass), and thus accurate definition of the organ mass is a crucial parameter for self-absorbed S values calculation.Our goal is to extent the study for accurate estimations in small animal imaging, whereas it is known that there is a large variety in the anatomy of the organs.« less
  • A Monte Carlo-based procedure to assess fetal doses from 6-MV external photon beam radiation treatments has been developed to improve upon existing techniques that are based on AAPM Task Group Report 36 published in 1995 [M. Stovall et al., Med. Phys. 22, 63-82 (1995)]. Anatomically realistic models of the pregnant patient representing 3-, 6-, and 9-month gestational stages were implemented into the MCNPX code together with a detailed accelerator model that is capable of simulating scattered and leakage radiation from the accelerator head. Absorbed doses to the fetus were calculated for six different treatment plans for sites above the fetusmore » and one treatment plan for fibrosarcoma in the knee. For treatment plans above the fetus, the fetal doses tended to increase with increasing stage of gestation. This was due to the decrease in distance between the fetal body and field edge with increasing stage of gestation. For the treatment field below the fetus, the absorbed doses tended to decrease with increasing gestational stage of the pregnant patient, due to the increasing size of the fetus and relative constant distance between the field edge and fetal body for each stage. The absorbed doses to the fetus for all treatment plans ranged from a maximum of 30.9 cGy to the 9-month fetus to 1.53 cGy to the 3-month fetus. The study demonstrates the feasibility to accurately determine the absorbed organ doses in the mother and fetus as part of the treatment planning and eventually in risk management.« less
  • Purpose: Dose calculation based on pencil beam (PB) algorithms has its shortcomings predicting dose in tissue heterogeneities. The aim of this study was to compare dose distributions of clinically applied non-intensity-modulated radiotherapy 15-MV plans for stereotactic body radiotherapy between voxel Monte Carlo (XVMC) calculation and PB calculation for lung lesions. Methods and Materials: To validate XVMC, one treatment plan was verified in an inhomogeneous thorax phantom with EDR2 film (Eastman Kodak, Rochester, NY). Both measured and calculated (PB and XVMC) dose distributions were compared regarding profiles and isodoses. Then, 35 lung plans originally created for clinical treatment by PB calculationmore » with the Eclipse planning system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) were recalculated by XVMC (investigational implementation in PrecisePLAN [Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden]). Clinically relevant dose-volume parameters for target and lung tissue were compared and analyzed statistically. Results: The XVMC calculation agreed well with film measurements (<1% difference in lateral profile), whereas the deviation between PB calculation and film measurements was up to +15%. On analysis of 35 clinical cases, the mean dose, minimal dose and coverage dose value for 95% volume of gross tumor volume were 1.14 {+-} 1.72 Gy, 1.68 {+-} 1.47 Gy, and 1.24 {+-} 1.04 Gy lower by XVMC compared with PB, respectively (prescription dose, 30 Gy). The volume covered by the 9 Gy isodose of lung was 2.73% {+-} 3.12% higher when calculated by XVMC compared with PB. The largest differences were observed for small lesions circumferentially encompassed by lung tissue. Conclusions: Pencil beam dose calculation overestimates dose to the tumor and underestimates lung volumes exposed to a given dose consistently for 15-MV photons. The degree of difference between XVMC and PB is tumor size and location dependent. Therefore XVMC calculation is helpful to further optimize treatment planning.« less