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Title: Organ and effective doses in infants undergoing upper gastrointestinal (UGI) fluoroscopic examination

Abstract

To provide more detailed data on organ and effective doses in digital upper gastrointestinal (UGI) fluoroscopy studies of newborns and infants, the present study was conducted employing the time-sequence videotape-analysis technique used in a companion study of newborn and infant voiding cystourethrograms (VCUG). This technique was originally pioneered [O. H. Suleiman, J. Anderson, B. Jones, G. U. Rao, and M. Rosenstein, Radiology 178, 653-658 (1991)] for adult UGI examinations. Individual video frames were analyzed to include combinations of field size, field center, x-ray projection, image intensifier, and magnification mode. Additionally, the peak tube potential and the mA or mAs values for each segment/subsegment or digital photospot were recorded for both the fluoroscopic and radiographic modes of operation. The data from videotape analysis were then used in conjunction with a patient-scalable newborn tomographic computational phantom to report both organ and effective dose values via Monte Carlo radiation transport. The study includes dose estimates for five simulated UGI examinations representative of patients ranging from three to six months of age. Effective dose values for UGI examinations ranged from 1.17 to 6.47 mSv, with a mean of 3.14 mSv and a large standard deviation of 2.15 mSv. The colon, lungs, stomach, liver, andmore » esophagus absorbed doses in sum were found to constitute between 63 and 75% of the effective dose in these UGI studies. Representing 23-30% of the effective dose, the lungs were found to be the most significant organ in the effective dose calculation. Approximately 80-95% of the effective dose is contributed by the dynamic fluoroscopy segments with larger percentages found in longer studies. The mean effective dose for newborn UGI examinations was not found to be statistically different from that seen in newborn VCUG examinations.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [2]
  1. Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-8300 (United States)
  2. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20951060
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 34; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: DOI: 10.1118/1.2426405; (c) 2007 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; DOSIMETRY; ESOPHAGUS; FLUOROSCOPY; IMAGE INTENSIFIERS; INFANTS; LARGE INTESTINE; LIVER; LUNGS; MONTE CARLO METHOD; PATIENTS; PEDIATRICS; PHANTOMS; RADIATION DOSES; RADIATION TRANSPORT; STOMACH; X RADIATION

Citation Formats

Staton, Robert J., Williams, Jonathon L., Arreola, Manuel M., Hintenlang, David E., Bolch, Wesley E., Department of Radiology, University of Florida/Shands Healthcare, Inc., Gainesville, Florida 32610-0374, and Departments of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-8300. Organ and effective doses in infants undergoing upper gastrointestinal (UGI) fluoroscopic examination. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1118/1.2426405.
Staton, Robert J., Williams, Jonathon L., Arreola, Manuel M., Hintenlang, David E., Bolch, Wesley E., Department of Radiology, University of Florida/Shands Healthcare, Inc., Gainesville, Florida 32610-0374, & Departments of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-8300. Organ and effective doses in infants undergoing upper gastrointestinal (UGI) fluoroscopic examination. United States. doi:10.1118/1.2426405.
Staton, Robert J., Williams, Jonathon L., Arreola, Manuel M., Hintenlang, David E., Bolch, Wesley E., Department of Radiology, University of Florida/Shands Healthcare, Inc., Gainesville, Florida 32610-0374, and Departments of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-8300. Thu . "Organ and effective doses in infants undergoing upper gastrointestinal (UGI) fluoroscopic examination". United States. doi:10.1118/1.2426405.
@article{osti_20951060,
title = {Organ and effective doses in infants undergoing upper gastrointestinal (UGI) fluoroscopic examination},
author = {Staton, Robert J. and Williams, Jonathon L. and Arreola, Manuel M. and Hintenlang, David E. and Bolch, Wesley E. and Department of Radiology, University of Florida/Shands Healthcare, Inc., Gainesville, Florida 32610-0374 and Departments of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-8300},
abstractNote = {To provide more detailed data on organ and effective doses in digital upper gastrointestinal (UGI) fluoroscopy studies of newborns and infants, the present study was conducted employing the time-sequence videotape-analysis technique used in a companion study of newborn and infant voiding cystourethrograms (VCUG). This technique was originally pioneered [O. H. Suleiman, J. Anderson, B. Jones, G. U. Rao, and M. Rosenstein, Radiology 178, 653-658 (1991)] for adult UGI examinations. Individual video frames were analyzed to include combinations of field size, field center, x-ray projection, image intensifier, and magnification mode. Additionally, the peak tube potential and the mA or mAs values for each segment/subsegment or digital photospot were recorded for both the fluoroscopic and radiographic modes of operation. The data from videotape analysis were then used in conjunction with a patient-scalable newborn tomographic computational phantom to report both organ and effective dose values via Monte Carlo radiation transport. The study includes dose estimates for five simulated UGI examinations representative of patients ranging from three to six months of age. Effective dose values for UGI examinations ranged from 1.17 to 6.47 mSv, with a mean of 3.14 mSv and a large standard deviation of 2.15 mSv. The colon, lungs, stomach, liver, and esophagus absorbed doses in sum were found to constitute between 63 and 75% of the effective dose in these UGI studies. Representing 23-30% of the effective dose, the lungs were found to be the most significant organ in the effective dose calculation. Approximately 80-95% of the effective dose is contributed by the dynamic fluoroscopy segments with larger percentages found in longer studies. The mean effective dose for newborn UGI examinations was not found to be statistically different from that seen in newborn VCUG examinations.},
doi = {10.1118/1.2426405},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 2,
volume = 34,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Feb 15 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Feb 15 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}