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Title: External beam radiotherapy as postoperative treatment of diffuse pigmented villonodular synovitis

Abstract

Purpose: Diffuse pigmented villonodular synovitis is a rare proliferative disorder of synovial membranes with invasive and expansive growth patterns. Radical synovectomy is regarded as the treatment of choice. However, because of the high recurrence rates, additive treatment might be useful. Radiotherapy (RT) has been evaluated with positive results, but the optimal treatment schedules are vague. We have reviewed our experience with postoperative RT in cases of suspected or proven residual disease. Methods and Materials: Between December 1996 and January 2006, 7 diffuse pigmented villonodular synovitis patients underwent RT at our institution. The most common location was the knee joint (5 patients). All patients underwent radical surgery and were treated subsequently with 6-MV photon RT. The total doses applied were 30-50 Gy, depending on the resection status and estimated risk of relapse. For analysis, we retrospectively reviewed all patients in April 2006. Results: The mean follow-up time was 29 months (range, 3-112 months). RT had no acute adverse effects. At the assessment, no evidence was found of recurrent or persisting disease in any patient. Of the 7 patients, 6 reported asymptomatic limb function and excellent quality of life; 1 patient had persistent restriction of joint movement after repeated surgery. No radiotherapeuticmore » late effects were seen. Conclusion: The results of our series have confirmed the efficacy and safety of postoperative RT for diffuse pigmented villonodular synovitis. Hence, this treatment should be considered for patients with suspected or proven residual disease.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [3]
  1. Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany). E-mail: Bernhard.Berger@med.uni-tuebingen.de
  2. Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany)
  3. Department of Radiation Oncology, Marienhospital Stuttgart, Stuttgart (Germany)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20944772
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 67; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.10.016; PII: S0360-3016(06)03340-2; Copyright (c) 2007 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; BONE JOINTS; CARCINOMAS; HEALTH HAZARDS; LIMBS; PATIENTS; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY; SURGERY; TENDONS; TUMOR CELLS

Citation Formats

Berger, Bernhard, Ganswindt, Ute, Bamberg, Michael, and Hehr, Thomas. External beam radiotherapy as postoperative treatment of diffuse pigmented villonodular synovitis. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.10.016.
Berger, Bernhard, Ganswindt, Ute, Bamberg, Michael, & Hehr, Thomas. External beam radiotherapy as postoperative treatment of diffuse pigmented villonodular synovitis. United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.10.016.
Berger, Bernhard, Ganswindt, Ute, Bamberg, Michael, and Hehr, Thomas. Thu . "External beam radiotherapy as postoperative treatment of diffuse pigmented villonodular synovitis". United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.10.016.
@article{osti_20944772,
title = {External beam radiotherapy as postoperative treatment of diffuse pigmented villonodular synovitis},
author = {Berger, Bernhard and Ganswindt, Ute and Bamberg, Michael and Hehr, Thomas},
abstractNote = {Purpose: Diffuse pigmented villonodular synovitis is a rare proliferative disorder of synovial membranes with invasive and expansive growth patterns. Radical synovectomy is regarded as the treatment of choice. However, because of the high recurrence rates, additive treatment might be useful. Radiotherapy (RT) has been evaluated with positive results, but the optimal treatment schedules are vague. We have reviewed our experience with postoperative RT in cases of suspected or proven residual disease. Methods and Materials: Between December 1996 and January 2006, 7 diffuse pigmented villonodular synovitis patients underwent RT at our institution. The most common location was the knee joint (5 patients). All patients underwent radical surgery and were treated subsequently with 6-MV photon RT. The total doses applied were 30-50 Gy, depending on the resection status and estimated risk of relapse. For analysis, we retrospectively reviewed all patients in April 2006. Results: The mean follow-up time was 29 months (range, 3-112 months). RT had no acute adverse effects. At the assessment, no evidence was found of recurrent or persisting disease in any patient. Of the 7 patients, 6 reported asymptomatic limb function and excellent quality of life; 1 patient had persistent restriction of joint movement after repeated surgery. No radiotherapeutic late effects were seen. Conclusion: The results of our series have confirmed the efficacy and safety of postoperative RT for diffuse pigmented villonodular synovitis. Hence, this treatment should be considered for patients with suspected or proven residual disease.},
doi = {10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.10.016},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 4,
volume = 67,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Mar 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Thu Mar 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
  • Purpose: Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is a rare proliferative disorder of the synovium with locally aggressive behavior. We reviewed our experience using radiation therapy in the treatment of PVNS. Materials and Methods: Seventeen patients with 18 sites of PVNS were treated with radiation between 1993 and 2007. Cases were retrospectively reviewed for patient information, treatment parameters, complications, and outcome. Seven sites were primary presentations and 11 were recurrent with an average of 2.5 prior surgical interventions. The most common location was the knee joint (67%). Cytoreductive surgery was performed before radiation therapy in 16/18 sites with all having proven ormore » suspected residual disease. Radiation was delivered using 4-15 MV photons with an average total dose 34 Gy (range, 20-36 Gy). Seventeen of 18 sites (94%) had postradiotherapy imaging. Results: With average follow-up of 46 months (range, 8-181 months), initial local control was achieved in 75% (12/16) of the sites with prior cytoreductive surgery (mean time to recurrence, 38 months). Ultimate local control was 100% after repeat resection (mean follow-up, 61 months). Two additional sites without prior cytoreductive surgery showed growth after radiotherapy (mean time to documented growth, 10.5 months). Seventeen of the 18 involved joints (94%) were scored as excellent or good PVNS-related function, one site (5%) as fair function, and no site with poor function. No patient required amputation; and there were no Grade 3/4 treatment-related complications. Conclusion: Postoperative external beam radiation is effective in preventing disease recurrence and should be offered following maximal cytoreduction to enhance local control in PVNS.« less
  • Purpose: The German Cooperative Group on Radiotherapy in Benign Diseases (GCG-BD) conducted a pattern-of-care study (PCS) to analyze the radiation therapy (RT) practice for pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS). Methods and Materials: In 2007, a structured questionnaire to assess the number of patients, the pretreatments, the RT indication, technique, target volume concepts, outcome data, and possible early or late toxicity was circulated to 227 institutions. Results: Until August 2008, a response was available from 189 institutions (83.2 %), of whom 19 (10.0 %) experienced RT for PVNS. Complete clinical information was available for 41 patients from 14 RT departments. Thirty patientsmore » (73.2 %) received postsurgical RT because of primary incomplete resection, 11 patients (26.8 %) as an adjunct after complete resections of recurrences or unclear resection status. The total doses ranged from 30 to 50 Gy (median, 36 Gy), the median single dose was 2.0 Gy. Local control was achieved 95.1%, and 82.9% had no or only slight functional impairment. The early and late toxicity was mild ({<=}RTOG Grade II). Conclusions: Radiation therapy is a safe and effective treatment for PVNS in the postoperative setting after incomplete resection, and also as a salvage option for treatment of recurrences it provides a high rate of local control.« less
  • A 40-year-old woman with recurrent pigmented villonodular synovitis of the knee was treated with /sup 90/Y radiocolloid. The advantages of /sup 90/Y include effectiveness, low cost, simplicity, and low morbidity. The radiophysical properties of /sup 90/Y that make it a useful therapeutic agent are short half-life, pure beta emission and good penetration of the soft tissues. Side effects are few, predictable, and for the most part, avoidable. Radionecrosis of soft tissue, needle tract pigmentation, injection site tenderness, pyrexia, and lymphocyte chromosomal abnormalities have been reported. The indications for intra-articular radiocolloid therapy are the same as for surgical synovectomy, except thatmore » it is reserved for patients older than 35 years of age. The pathologic events following /sup 90/Y therapy in experimental animals show coagulation necrosis of the synovium, followed by an intense inflammatory reaction, leading ultimately to fibrosis. /sup 90/Y is a useful adjuvant in the treatment of recurrent pigmented villonodular synovitis.« less
  • Purpose: To review institutional outcomes for patients treated for differentiated thyroid cancer with postoperative conformal external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: This is a single-institution retrospective review of 131 consecutive patients with differentiated thyroid cancer who underwent EBRT between January 1996 and December 2005. Histologic diagnoses included 104 papillary, 21 follicular, and six mixed papillary-follicular types. American Joint Committee on Cancer stage distribution was Stage III in 2 patients, Stage IVa-IVc in 128, and not assessable in 1. Thirty-four patients (26%) had high-risk histologic types and 76 (58%) had recurrent disease. Extraglandular disease spread was seen in 126 patientsmore » (96%), microscopically positive surgical margins were seen in 62 patients (47%), and gross residual disease was seen in 15 patients (11%). Median EBRT dose was 60 Gy (range, 38-72 Gy). Fifty-seven patients (44%) were treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) to a median dose of 60 Gy (range, 56-66 Gy). Median follow-up was 38 months (range, 0-134 months). Results: Kaplan-Meier estimates of locoregional relapse-free survival, disease-specific survival, and overall survival at 4 years were 79%, 76%, and 73%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, high-risk histologic features and gross residual disease predicted for inferior locoregional relapse-free survival, whereas high-risk histologic features, M1 disease, and gross residual disease predicted for inferior disease-specific and overall survival. The IMRT did not impact on survival outcomes, but was associated with less frequent severe late morbidity (12% vs. 2%). Conclusions: Postoperative conformal EBRT provides durable locoregional disease control for patients with high-risk differentiated thyroid cancer if disease is reduced to microscopic burden. Patients with gross disease face significantly worse outcomes. The IMRT may significantly reduce chronic radiation morbidity, but requires additional study.« less