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Title: Management of locally recurrent soft-tissue sarcoma after prior surgery and radiation therapy

Abstract

Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate outcome and treatment toxicity after wide local re-excision (WLE), with or without additional radiation therapy, for patients with isolated first local recurrence of soft-tissue sarcoma arising within a previously irradiated field. Methods: A retrospective review was performed of 62 consecutive patients. All patients underwent prior resection and external beam radiation. For recurrent disease, 25 patients were treated with WLE alone, and 37 patients were treated with WLE and additional radiation (45- 64 Gy). In 33 patients, the radiation was delivered via an afterloaded brachytherapy, single-plane implant. Results: The 5-year disease specific and distant metastasis-free survival rates were 65% and 73%, respectively. Local control (LC) at 5 years was 51%, and on multivariate analysis, a positive surgical resection margin (p< 0.001) was associated with a lower rate of LC. Reirradiation was not associated with improved LC; however complications requiring outpatient or surgical management were more common in patients who had undergone reirradiation (80% vs. 17%, p < 0.001). Amputation was also more common in the subgroup of patients who underwent extremity reirradiation (35% with radiation vs. 11% without, p = 0.05), although only one amputation was performed to resolve a treatment complication.more » Conclusion: Conservative surgery alone results in LC in a minority of patients who have failed locally after previous excision and external beam radiation. Although selection biases and small patient numbers confound the analysis, local treatment intensification with additional radiation does not clearly improve outcome after surgical excision alone, and is associated with an increase in complications.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [4];  [4];  [4];  [4];  [1]
  1. Division of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)
  2. Division of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States). E-mail: mballo@mdanderson.org
  3. Department of Plastic Surgery, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)
  4. Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20944771
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 67; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.10.036; PII: S0360-3016(06)03375-X; Copyright (c) 2007 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; BRACHYTHERAPY; IRRADIATION; METASTASES; MULTIVARIATE ANALYSIS; PATIENTS; RADIATION SOURCE IMPLANTS; SARCOMAS; SURGERY; TOXICITY

Citation Formats

Torres, Mylin A., Ballo, Matthew T., Butler, Charles E., Feig, Barry W., Cormier, Janice N., Lewis, Valerae O., Pollock, Raphael E., Pisters, Peter W., and Zagars, Gunar K. Management of locally recurrent soft-tissue sarcoma after prior surgery and radiation therapy. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.10.036.
Torres, Mylin A., Ballo, Matthew T., Butler, Charles E., Feig, Barry W., Cormier, Janice N., Lewis, Valerae O., Pollock, Raphael E., Pisters, Peter W., & Zagars, Gunar K. Management of locally recurrent soft-tissue sarcoma after prior surgery and radiation therapy. United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.10.036.
Torres, Mylin A., Ballo, Matthew T., Butler, Charles E., Feig, Barry W., Cormier, Janice N., Lewis, Valerae O., Pollock, Raphael E., Pisters, Peter W., and Zagars, Gunar K. Thu . "Management of locally recurrent soft-tissue sarcoma after prior surgery and radiation therapy". United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.10.036.
@article{osti_20944771,
title = {Management of locally recurrent soft-tissue sarcoma after prior surgery and radiation therapy},
author = {Torres, Mylin A. and Ballo, Matthew T. and Butler, Charles E. and Feig, Barry W. and Cormier, Janice N. and Lewis, Valerae O. and Pollock, Raphael E. and Pisters, Peter W. and Zagars, Gunar K.},
abstractNote = {Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate outcome and treatment toxicity after wide local re-excision (WLE), with or without additional radiation therapy, for patients with isolated first local recurrence of soft-tissue sarcoma arising within a previously irradiated field. Methods: A retrospective review was performed of 62 consecutive patients. All patients underwent prior resection and external beam radiation. For recurrent disease, 25 patients were treated with WLE alone, and 37 patients were treated with WLE and additional radiation (45- 64 Gy). In 33 patients, the radiation was delivered via an afterloaded brachytherapy, single-plane implant. Results: The 5-year disease specific and distant metastasis-free survival rates were 65% and 73%, respectively. Local control (LC) at 5 years was 51%, and on multivariate analysis, a positive surgical resection margin (p< 0.001) was associated with a lower rate of LC. Reirradiation was not associated with improved LC; however complications requiring outpatient or surgical management were more common in patients who had undergone reirradiation (80% vs. 17%, p < 0.001). Amputation was also more common in the subgroup of patients who underwent extremity reirradiation (35% with radiation vs. 11% without, p = 0.05), although only one amputation was performed to resolve a treatment complication. Conclusion: Conservative surgery alone results in LC in a minority of patients who have failed locally after previous excision and external beam radiation. Although selection biases and small patient numbers confound the analysis, local treatment intensification with additional radiation does not clearly improve outcome after surgical excision alone, and is associated with an increase in complications.},
doi = {10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.10.036},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 4,
volume = 67,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Mar 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Thu Mar 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
  • Background: A joint analysis of data from centers involved in the Spanish Cooperative Initiative for Intraoperative Electron Radiotherapy was performed to investigate long-term outcomes of locally recurrent soft tissue sarcoma (LR-STS) patients treated with a multidisciplinary approach. Methods and Materials: Patients with a histologic diagnosis of LR-STS (extremity, 43%; trunk wall, 24%; retroperitoneum, 33%) and no distant metastases who underwent radical surgery and intraoperative electron radiation therapy (IOERT; median dose, 12.5 Gy) were considered eligible for participation in this study. In addition, 62% received external beam radiation therapy (EBRT; median dose, 50 Gy). Results: From 1986 to 2012, a totalmore » of 103 patients from 3 Spanish expert IOERT institutions were analyzed. With a median follow-up of 57 months (range, 2-311 months), 5-year local control (LC) was 60%. The 5-year IORT in-field control, disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival were 73%, 43%, and 52%, respectively. In the multivariate analysis, no EBRT to treat the LR-STS (P=.02) and microscopically involved margin resection status (P=.04) retained significance in relation to LC. With regard to IORT in-field control, only not delivering EBRT to the LR-STS retained significance in the multivariate analysis (P=.03). Conclusion: This joint analysis revealed that surgical margin and EBRT affect LC but that, given the high risk of distant metastases, DFS remains modest. Intensified local treatment needs to be further tested in the context of more efficient concurrent, neoadjuvant, and adjuvant systemic therapy.« less
  • Purpose: To critically assess the prognostic value of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer–Soft Tissue and Bone Sarcoma Group (EORTC-STBSG) response score and define histologic appearance after preoperative radiation therapy (RT) for soft tissue sarcoma (STS). Methods and Materials: For a cohort of 100 patients with STS of the extremity/trunk treated at our institution with preoperative RT followed by resection, 2 expert sarcoma pathologists evaluated the resected specimens for percent residual viable cells, necrosis, hyalinization/fibrosis, and infarction. The EORTC response score and other predictors of recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) were assessed by Kaplan-Meier and proportionalmore » hazard models. Results: Median tumor size was 7.5 cm; 92% were intermediate or high grade. Most common histologies were unclassified sarcoma (34%) and myxofibrosarcoma (25%). Median follow-up was 60 months. The 5-year local recurrence rate was 5%, 5-year RFS was 68%, and 5-year OS was 75%. Distribution of cases according to EORTC response score tiers was as follows: no residual viable tumor for 9 cases (9% pathologic complete response); <1% viable tumor for 0, ≥1% to <10% for 9, ≥10% to <50% for 44, and ≥50% for 38. There was no association between EORTC-STBSG response score and RFS or OS. Conversely, hyalinization/fibrosis was a significant independent favorable predictor for RFS (hazard ratio 0.49, P=.007) and OS (hazard ratio 0.36, P=.02). Conclusion: Histologic evaluation after preoperative RT for STS showed a 9% pathologic complete response rate. The EORTC-STBSG response score and percent viable cells were not prognostic. Hyalinization/fibrosis was associated with favorable outcome, and if validated, may become a valid endpoint for neoadjuvant trials.« less
  • Purpose: To analyze the outcomes of and identify prognostic factors for patients treated with surgery and intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) for locally advanced and recurrent soft-tissue sarcoma in adults from a single institution. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 50 consecutive patients treated with IORT to 62 sites of disease. Primary sites included retroperitoneum-pelvis (78%), extremity (8%), and other (14%). Seventy percent of patients had recurrent disease failing prior surgery (70%) and/or radiation (32%). Mean disease-free interval (DFI) before IORT was 1.9 years (range, 2 weeks-5.4 years). The IORT was delivered with orthovoltage X-rays using individually sized beveled cone applicators. Clinicalmore » characteristics were as follows: mean tumor size, 10 cm (range, 1-25 cm); high-grade histologic subtype (72%); and mean dose, 1,159 cGy (range, 600-1,600 cGy). Postoperative radiation or chemotherapy was administered to 37% of IORT Sites and 32% of patients, respectively. Outcomes measured were infield control (IFC), locoregional control (LRC), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), disease-specific survival (DSS), and treatment-related complications. Mean and median follow-up of alive patients were 59 and 35 months, respectively. Results: Kaplan-Meier 5-year IFC, LRC, DMFS, and DSS probabilities for the entire group were 55%, 26%, 51%, and 25%, respectively. Prognostic factors found to be significant (p < 0.05) on multivariate analysis were prior DFI and tumor size for LRC, extremity location and leiomyosarcoma histologic subtype for DMFS, and prior DFI for DSS. Our cohort had five Grade 3/4 complications associated with treatment or a 5-year Kaplan-Meier Grade 3/4 complication-free survival rate of 85%. Conclusions: IORT after tumor reductive surgery is well tolerated and seems to confer IFC in carefully selected patients.« less
  • Purpose: This study assesses the long-term outcome of patients with retroperitoneal soft-tissue sarcomas treated by maximal resection in combination with intraoperative electron-beam therapy (IOERT) and postoperative external-beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: From 1991 to 2004, 67 patients were treated with curative intent for primary (n = 26) or recurrent (n = 41) retroperitoneal soft-tissue sarcoma. All patients underwent maximal resection in combination with IOERT (mean dose, 15 Gy), 45 patients underwent additional postoperative EBRT, and 20 patients were previously irradiated. Results: The 5-year actuarial overall survival (OS), disease-free survival, local control (LC), and freedom from metastatic disease of all patientsmore » was 64%, 28%, 40%, and 50%, respectively. The 5-year LC inside the IOERT field was 72%. For patients who completed IOERT and EBRT after R0-resection 5-year and 10-year OS was 80%, and 5-year and 10-year LC was 100%. Only 1 of the 21 patients after R0-resection and only 8 of 34 patients after R1-resection compared with 9 of 12 patients after R2-resection experienced inside IOERT-field relapse. Grade II or higher late complications were seen in 21% of the patients, but only 2 patients required surgical intervention because of late complications. Conclusion: In selected patients, IOERT results in excellent local control and survival, with acceptable morbidity.« less
  • Purpose: To analyze prognostic factors associated with survival in patients after intraoperative electrons containing resective surgical rescue of locally recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC). Methods and Materials: From January 1995 to December 2011, 60 patients with LRRC underwent extended surgery (n=38: multiorgan [43%], bone [28%], soft tissue [38%]) or nonextended (n=22) surgical resection, including a component of intraoperative electron-beam radiation therapy (IOERT) to the pelvic recurrence tumor bed. Twenty-eight (47%) of these patients also received external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) (range, 30.6-50.4 Gy). Survival outcomes were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method, and risk factors were identified by univariate and multivariate analyses.more » Results: The median follow-up time was 36 months (range, 2-189 months), and the 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year rates for locoregional control (LRC) and overall survival (OS) were 86%, 52%, and 44%; and 78%, 53%, 43%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, R1 resection, EBRT at the time of pelvic rerecurrence, no tumor fragmentation, and non-lymph node metastasis retained significance with regard to LRR. R1 resection and no tumor fragmentation showed a significant association with OS after adjustment for other covariates. Conclusions: EBRT treatment integrated for rescue, resection radicality, and not involved fragmented resection specimens are associated with improved LRC in patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer. Additionally, tumor fragmentation could be compensated by EBRT. Present results suggest that a significant group of patients with LRRC may benefit from EBRT treatment integrated with extended surgery and IOERT.« less