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Title: Ototoxicity after radiotherapy for head and neck tumors

Abstract

Purpose: To investigate the incidence of radiation-induced ototoxicity according to the total dose delivered to specific parts of the auditory system, fractionation, and chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: Records of 325 patients treated for primary extracranial head and neck tumors with curative intent who received radiotherapy between 1964 and 2000 (median follow-up, 5.4 years) were retrospectively reviewed. Reconstructions of the treatment plans were generated to estimate the doses received by components of the auditory system. Results: Radiotherapy-induced morbidity developed in 41.8% of patients (external ear, 33.2%; middle ear, 28.6%; and inner ear, 26.8%). Univariate/multivariate analyses indicate that total dose received by parts of the auditory system seem to be significant, though fractionation and chemoradiation may contribute to the incidence of ototoxicities. Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) was observed in 49 patients (15.1%). Univariate and multivariate analyses indicated that age (p = 0.0177 and p = 0.005) and dose to cochlea (p < 0.0001 and p < 0.0001) were significant, and chemoradiation (p = 0.0281 and p = 0.006) may increase the incidence of SNHL. Five-year and 10-year actuarial risk of clinically overt SNHL increased to 37% (p > 0.0001) above doses of 60.5 Gy compared to 3% at doses below 60.5 Gy.more » For patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy, clinically overt SNHL increased to 30% compared to 18% in the no-chemotherapy group at 10 years (p = 0.0281). Conclusion: Radiotherapy toxicity was observed in all parts of the auditory system with median doses for incidence varying between 60 Gy to 66 Gy. Total dose to organ seems to be a significant factor though fractionation and chemo-radiation may contribute to ototoxicities.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [1];  [3]
  1. Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States)
  2. Department of Otolaryngology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States)
  3. Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States). E-mail: mendewil@shands.ufl.edu
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20944689
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 67; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.09.017; PII: S0360-3016(06)02996-8; Copyright (c) 2007 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; AUDITORY ORGANS; CARCINOMAS; CHEMOTHERAPY; FRACTIONATED IRRADIATION; HEAD; MULTIVARIATE ANALYSIS; NECK; PATIENTS; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY; TOXICITY

Citation Formats

Bhandare, Niranjan, Antonelli, Patrick J., Morris, Christopher G., Malayapa, Robert S., and Mendenhall, William M. Ototoxicity after radiotherapy for head and neck tumors. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.09.017.
Bhandare, Niranjan, Antonelli, Patrick J., Morris, Christopher G., Malayapa, Robert S., & Mendenhall, William M. Ototoxicity after radiotherapy for head and neck tumors. United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.09.017.
Bhandare, Niranjan, Antonelli, Patrick J., Morris, Christopher G., Malayapa, Robert S., and Mendenhall, William M. Thu . "Ototoxicity after radiotherapy for head and neck tumors". United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.09.017.
@article{osti_20944689,
title = {Ototoxicity after radiotherapy for head and neck tumors},
author = {Bhandare, Niranjan and Antonelli, Patrick J. and Morris, Christopher G. and Malayapa, Robert S. and Mendenhall, William M.},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To investigate the incidence of radiation-induced ototoxicity according to the total dose delivered to specific parts of the auditory system, fractionation, and chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: Records of 325 patients treated for primary extracranial head and neck tumors with curative intent who received radiotherapy between 1964 and 2000 (median follow-up, 5.4 years) were retrospectively reviewed. Reconstructions of the treatment plans were generated to estimate the doses received by components of the auditory system. Results: Radiotherapy-induced morbidity developed in 41.8% of patients (external ear, 33.2%; middle ear, 28.6%; and inner ear, 26.8%). Univariate/multivariate analyses indicate that total dose received by parts of the auditory system seem to be significant, though fractionation and chemoradiation may contribute to the incidence of ototoxicities. Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) was observed in 49 patients (15.1%). Univariate and multivariate analyses indicated that age (p = 0.0177 and p = 0.005) and dose to cochlea (p < 0.0001 and p < 0.0001) were significant, and chemoradiation (p = 0.0281 and p = 0.006) may increase the incidence of SNHL. Five-year and 10-year actuarial risk of clinically overt SNHL increased to 37% (p > 0.0001) above doses of 60.5 Gy compared to 3% at doses below 60.5 Gy. For patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy, clinically overt SNHL increased to 30% compared to 18% in the no-chemotherapy group at 10 years (p = 0.0281). Conclusion: Radiotherapy toxicity was observed in all parts of the auditory system with median doses for incidence varying between 60 Gy to 66 Gy. Total dose to organ seems to be a significant factor though fractionation and chemo-radiation may contribute to ototoxicities.},
doi = {10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.09.017},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 2,
volume = 67,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
  • Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare changes in salivary gland function after intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and conventional radiotherapy (RT), with or without Amifostine, for tumors of the head-and-neck region using quantitative salivary gland scintigraphy (QSGS). Methods and Materials: A total of 75 patients received pre- and post-therapeutic QSGS to quantify the salivary gland function. In all, 251 salivary glands were independently evaluated. Changes in the maximum uptake ({delta}U) and relative excretion rate ({delta}F) both pre- and post-RT were determined to characterize radiation-induced changes in the salivary gland function. In addition, dose-response curves were calculated. Results: In allmore » groups, maximum uptake and relative excretion rate were reduced after RT ({delta}U {<=}0 and {delta}F {<=}0). The reduction was significantly lower for IMRT than for conventional RT. For the parotid glands, the reduction was smaller for the IMRT-low than for the IMRT-high group. For the Amifostine-high and the conventional group the difference was significant only for one parameter ({delta}U, parotid and submandibular glands, p < 0.05). In contrast to this, the difference between the Amifostine-low and the conventional group was always significant or at least showed a clear trend for both changes in U and F. In regard to the endpoint 'reduction of the salivary gland excretion rate of more than 50%,' the dose-response curves yielded D{sub 50}-values of 34.2 {+-} 12.2 Gy for the conventionally treated group and 36.8 {+-} 2.9 Gy for the IMRT group. For the Amifostine group, an increased D{sub 50}-values of 46.3 {+-} 2.3 Gy was obtained. Conclusion: Intensity-modulated RT can significantly reduce the loss of parotid gland function when respecting a certain dose threshold. Conventional RT plus Amifostine prevents reduced salivary gland function only in the patient group treated with <40.6 Gy.« less
  • Purpose: Cisplatin chemo-irradiation is increasingly used in locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. The objective of this study is to determine risk factors of ototoxicity due to intra-arterial high-dose cisplatin chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: A prospective analysis of hearing thresholds at low and (ultra) high frequencies obtained before, during, and after treatment in 146 patients. Treatment consisted of intra-arterial infusion of high-dose cisplatin (150 mg/m{sup 2}, four courses) with sodium thiosulfate rescue and concurrent radiation therapy (70 Gy). Patient and chemoradiation variables were studied in a multivariate analysis. Results: After treatment, 23% of the ears weremore » under consideration for hearing aids because of therapy. Twenty-two percent of the patients developed an increase in air-bone gap >10 dB during or after therapy. In the multivariate explanatory analysis, cumulative dose of cisplatin and radiation therapy, and young age displayed a causal relationship with increased sensorineural hearing loss during and after therapy (p < 0.001). In the multivariate prediction analysis, pretreatment hearing level of the concerning ear was identified as an independent predictive factor for hearing capability after therapy (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: Both cisplatin and radiation therapy were proven to induce sensorineural hearing loss, in this study with short-term follow-up. Of all patient and treatment variables studied, the patients pretreatment hearing level appeared to be the main predictive factor for hearing capability after high-dose intra-arterial cisplatin chemoradiation.« less
  • Radiation-induced carotid artery disease following high-dose (greater than 50-Gy) radiotherapy for head and neck cancer may become more common as improved treatment results in longer survival. Duplex ultrasound scans were obtained in 91 consecutive patients to determine whether increased incidence and severity of extracranial carotid disease correlate with prior radiotherapy. Fifty-three patients who underwent radiotherapy an average of 28 months previously and 38 patients who received no radiotherapy were studied. Thirty percent of the irradiated group had lesions of the carotid arteries that were either moderate or severe vs only 6% of the control patients. Five patients were symptomatic; allmore » had undergone radiotherapy. Long-term follow-up with sequential duplex ultrasound examinations is indicated in patients receiving high-dose radiotherapy for head and neck tumors, to detect radiation-induced carotid artery disease and prevent late sequelae.« less
  • Purpose: To investigate the incidence of radiotherapy (RT)-induced central and primary hypothyroidism regarding total dose, fractionation, and adjuvant chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the data from 312 patients treated with RT for extracranial head-and-neck tumors between 1964 and 2000. The cervical lymph nodes were irradiated in 197 patients. The radiation doses to the thyroid gland and hypothalamic-pituitary axis were estimated by reconstructing the treatment plans. Results: Clinical central hypothyroidism (CH) was observed in 17 patients (5.4%); the median clinical latency was 4.8 years. Clinical primary hypothyroidism (PH) was observed in 40 patients (20.3%); the median clinical latency wasmore » 3.1 years. Multivariate analysis of clinical CH revealed that fractionation, adjuvant chemotherapy, and total dose to the pituitary were not significant. Multivariate analysis of clinical PH revealed that the total dose to the thyroid (p = 0.043) was significant, but adjuvant chemotherapy, age, and gender were not. Of the patients tested for hypopituitarism, 14 (20.3%) of 69 demonstrated subclinical CH and 17 (27.4%) of 62 demonstrated subclinical PH. The 5-year and 10-year rates of freedom from clinical CH and PH were 97% and 87% and 68% and 67%, respectively. Of the patients tested, the 5-year and 10-year rates of freedom from subclinical CH and PH were 91% and 78% and 71% and 71%, respectively. Conclusion: Clinical and subclinical manifestations of late radiation toxicity were observed in the thyroid and hypothalamic-pituitary axis. Although CH did not indicate a dependence on fractionation, adjuvant chemotherapy, or total dose to the pituitary, PH showed a dependence on the total dose to the thyroid gland.« less
  • Purpose: To investigate the incidence of severe dry eye syndrome (DES) after external beam radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer and its dependence on the parameters relevant to external beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The present retrospective study included 78 patients treated for primary extracranial head-and-neck tumors between 1965 and 2000, whose lacrimal apparatus/entire globe was exposed to fractionated external beam radiotherapy. The dose received by the major lacrimal gland was used for analysis. The end point of the present study was the ophthalmologic diagnosis of severe DES leading to vision compromise. Results: Of the 78 patients, 40 developed severe DES leadingmore » to visual compromise. The incidence of DES increased steadily from 6% at 35-39.99 Gy to 50% at 45-49.99 Gy and 90% at 60-64.99 Gy. With a mean of 0.9 years (range, 1 month to 3 years), the latency of DES was observed to be a function of the total dose and the dose per fraction. On univariate and multivariate analysis, the total dose (p < .0001 and p < .0001, respectively) and dose per fraction (p {<=} .0001 and p = .0044, respectively) were significant. However, age, gender, and the use of chemoradiotherapy were not. The actuarial analysis indicated a 5-year probability of freedom from DES of 93% for doses <45 Gy, 29% for 45-59.9 Gy, and 3% doses {>=}60 Gy. A logistic normal tissue complication probability model fit to our data obtained a dose of 34 and 38 Gy corresponding to a 5% and 10% incidence of DES. Conclusion: With a dose of 34 Gy corresponding to a 5% incidence of DES, the risk of severe DES increased, and the latency decreased with an increase in the total dose and dose per fraction to the lacrimal gland. The effect of chemoradiotherapy and hyperfractionation on the risk of DES needs additional investigation.« less