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Title: Dosimetric parameters as predictive factors for biochemical control in patients with higher risk prostate cancer treated with Pd-103 and supplemental beam radiation

Abstract

Purpose: To analyze the role of dosimetric quality parameters in maximizing cancer eradication in higher risk prostate cancer patients treated with palladium (Pd)-103 and supplemental beam radiation. Methods: One-hundred-seventy-nine patients treated with Pd-103 and supplemental beam radiation, with minimum 2 years follow-up prostate-specific antigen (PSA) values and posttreatment computed tomography scans were analyzed. Dosimetric parameters included the V100 (percent of the postimplant volume covered by the prescription dose), the D90 (the minimum dose that covered 90% of the post implant volume), and the treatment margins (the radial distance between the prostatic edge and the prescription isodose). Treatment margins (TMs) were calculated using premarket software. Results: Freedom from biochemical failure was 79% at 3 years, with 92 of the 179 patients (51%) followed beyond 3 years. In comparing patients who did or did not achieve biochemical control, the most striking differences were in biologic factors of pretreatment PSA and Gleason score. The V100, D90, and average TM all showed nonsignificant trends to higher values in patients with biochemical control. In multivariate analysis of each of the three dosimetric parameters against PSA and Gleason score, TM showed the strongest correlation with biochemical control (p = 0.19). Conclusions: For patients with intermediate andmore » high-risk prostate cancer treated with Pd-103 brachytherapy and external beam radiation, biologic factors (PSA and Gleason score) were the most important determinants of cancer eradication. However, there is a trend to better outcomes among patients with higher quality implant parameters, suggesting that attention to implant quality will maximize the likelihood of cure.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [1];  [2];  [6];  [4];  [1];  [2]
  1. Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)
  2. (United States)
  3. Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States) and Radiation Oncology, Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA (United States) and Group Health Cooperative, Seattle, WA (United States). E-mail: kent.Wallner@med.va.gov
  4. Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling, WV (United States)
  5. Radiation Oncology, Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA (United States)
  6. Varian Medical Systems, Charlottesville, VA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20944671
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 67; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.09.010; PII: S0360-3016(06)02963-4; Copyright (c) 2007 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ANTIGENS; BRACHYTHERAPY; CARCINOMAS; COMPUTER CODES; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; DOSIMETRY; MULTIVARIATE ANALYSIS; PALLADIUM 103; PATIENTS; PROSTATE; RADIATION DOSES; RADIATION SOURCE IMPLANTS

Citation Formats

Orio, Peter, Radiation Oncology, Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA, Wallner, Kent, Merrick, Gregory, Herstein, Andrew, Mitsuyama, Paul, Radiation Oncology, Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA, Thornton, Ken, Butler, Wayne, Sutlief, Steven, and Radiation Oncology, Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA. Dosimetric parameters as predictive factors for biochemical control in patients with higher risk prostate cancer treated with Pd-103 and supplemental beam radiation. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.09.010.
Orio, Peter, Radiation Oncology, Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA, Wallner, Kent, Merrick, Gregory, Herstein, Andrew, Mitsuyama, Paul, Radiation Oncology, Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA, Thornton, Ken, Butler, Wayne, Sutlief, Steven, & Radiation Oncology, Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA. Dosimetric parameters as predictive factors for biochemical control in patients with higher risk prostate cancer treated with Pd-103 and supplemental beam radiation. United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.09.010.
Orio, Peter, Radiation Oncology, Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA, Wallner, Kent, Merrick, Gregory, Herstein, Andrew, Mitsuyama, Paul, Radiation Oncology, Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA, Thornton, Ken, Butler, Wayne, Sutlief, Steven, and Radiation Oncology, Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA. Thu . "Dosimetric parameters as predictive factors for biochemical control in patients with higher risk prostate cancer treated with Pd-103 and supplemental beam radiation". United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.09.010.
@article{osti_20944671,
title = {Dosimetric parameters as predictive factors for biochemical control in patients with higher risk prostate cancer treated with Pd-103 and supplemental beam radiation},
author = {Orio, Peter and Radiation Oncology, Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA and Wallner, Kent and Merrick, Gregory and Herstein, Andrew and Mitsuyama, Paul and Radiation Oncology, Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA and Thornton, Ken and Butler, Wayne and Sutlief, Steven and Radiation Oncology, Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To analyze the role of dosimetric quality parameters in maximizing cancer eradication in higher risk prostate cancer patients treated with palladium (Pd)-103 and supplemental beam radiation. Methods: One-hundred-seventy-nine patients treated with Pd-103 and supplemental beam radiation, with minimum 2 years follow-up prostate-specific antigen (PSA) values and posttreatment computed tomography scans were analyzed. Dosimetric parameters included the V100 (percent of the postimplant volume covered by the prescription dose), the D90 (the minimum dose that covered 90% of the post implant volume), and the treatment margins (the radial distance between the prostatic edge and the prescription isodose). Treatment margins (TMs) were calculated using premarket software. Results: Freedom from biochemical failure was 79% at 3 years, with 92 of the 179 patients (51%) followed beyond 3 years. In comparing patients who did or did not achieve biochemical control, the most striking differences were in biologic factors of pretreatment PSA and Gleason score. The V100, D90, and average TM all showed nonsignificant trends to higher values in patients with biochemical control. In multivariate analysis of each of the three dosimetric parameters against PSA and Gleason score, TM showed the strongest correlation with biochemical control (p = 0.19). Conclusions: For patients with intermediate and high-risk prostate cancer treated with Pd-103 brachytherapy and external beam radiation, biologic factors (PSA and Gleason score) were the most important determinants of cancer eradication. However, there is a trend to better outcomes among patients with higher quality implant parameters, suggesting that attention to implant quality will maximize the likelihood of cure.},
doi = {10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.09.010},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 2,
volume = 67,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
  • Purpose: To evaluate the influence of patient- and treatment-related factors on freedom from biochemical failure (FFbF) in patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: From a prospectively collected database of 2250 men treated at Mount Sinai Hospital from 1990 to 2004 with low-dose-rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer, 558 men with either one or more intermediate-risk features (prostate-specific antigen [PSA] level 10-20 ng/mL, Gleason score 7, or Stage T2b) were identified who had a minimum follow-up of 24 months and postimplant CT-based dosimetric analysis. Biologically effective dose (BED) values were calculated to compare doses from different isotopes and treatment regimens.more » Patients were treated with brachytherapy with or without hormone therapy and/or external-beam radiotherapy. Patient- and treatment-related factors were analyzed with respect to FFbF. The median follow-up was 60 months (range, 24-167 months). Biochemical failure was defined according to the Phoenix definition. Univariate analyses were used to determine whether any variable was predictive of FFbF. A two-sided p value of <0.05 was considered significant. Results: Overall, the actuarial FFbF at 10 years was 86%. Dose (BED <150 Gy{sub 2} vs. {>=}150 Gy{sub 2}) was the only significant predictor of FFbF (p < 0.001). None of the other variables (PSA, external-beam radiotherapy, Gleason score, treatment type, hormones, stage, and number of risk factors) was found to be a statistically significant predictor of 10-year FFbF. Conclusions: Radiation dose is an important predictor of FFbF in intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Treatment should continue to be individualized according to presenting disease characteristics until results from Radiation Therapy Oncology Group trial 0232 become available.« less
  • Purpose: To identify prognostic factors and evaluate biochemical control rates for patients with localized prostate cancer treated with either high-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or conventional-dose three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy 3D-CRT. Methods: Four hundred sixteen patients with a minimum follow-up of 3 years (median, 5 years) were included. Two hundred seventy-one patients received 3D-CRT with a median dose of 68.4 Gy (range, 66-71 Gy). The next 145 patients received IMRT with a median dose of 75.6 Gy (range, 70.2-77.4 Gy). Biochemical control rates were calculated according to both American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) consensus definitions. Prognostic factors were identifiedmore » using both univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: The 5-year biochemical control rate was 60.4% for 3D-CRT and 74.1% for IMRT (p < 0.0001, first ASTRO Consensus definition). Using the ASTRO Phoenix definition, the 5-year biochemical control rate was 74.4% and 84.6% with 3D-RT and IMRT, respectively (p = 0.0326). Univariate analyses determined that PSA level, T stage, Gleason score, perineural invasion, and radiation dose were predictive of biochemical control. On multivariate analysis, dose, Gleason score, and perineural invasion remained significant. Conclusion: On the basis of both ASTRO definitions, dose, Gleason score, and perineural invasion were predictive of biochemical control. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy allowed delivery of higher doses of radiation with very low toxicity, resulting in improved biochemical control.« less
  • Purpose: To validate the prognostic value of interval to biochemical failure (IBF) in patients with high-risk prostate cancer (HiRPCa) treated with combined-modality radiation therapy (CMRT) with or without androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective review of HiRPCa (prostate-specific antigen >20 ng/mL, Gleason score [GS] 8-10, or clinical T stage T3-T4) treated with either dose-escalated external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) or CMRT. Interval to biochemical failure was classified as ≤18 or >18 months from the end of all therapy to the date of biochemical failure (BF). Kaplan-Meier methods and Cox proportional hazards regression were used tomore » evaluate the prognostic value of IBF ≤18 months for distant metastasis (DM) and prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM). Results: Of 958 patients with a median follow-up of 63.2 months, 175 patients experienced BF. In those with BF, there were no differences in pretreatment clinical characteristics between the EBRT and CMRT groups, except for a higher proportion of patients with GS 8-10 in the CMRT group (70% vs 52%, P=.02). Median IBF after all therapy was 24.0 months (interquartile range 9.6-46.0) in the EBRT group and 18.9 months (interquartile range 9.2-34.5) in the CMRT group (P=.055). On univariate analysis, IBF ≤18 months was associated with increased risk of DM and PCSM in the entire cohort and the individual EBRT and CMRT groups. On multivariate analysis, only GS 9-10 and IBF ≤18 months, but not the radiation therapy regimen or ADT use, predicted DM (hazard ratio [HR] 3.7, P<.01, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4-10.3 for GS 9-10; HR 3.9, P<.0001, 95% CI 2.4-6.5 for IBF ≤18 months) and PCSM (HR 14.8, P<.009, 95% CI 2.0-110 for GS 9-10; HR 4.4, P<.0001, 95% CI 2.4-8.1 for IBF ≤18 months). Conclusions: Short IBF was highly prognostic for higher DM and PCSM in patients with HiRPCa. The prognostic value of IBF for DM and PCSM was not affected by the radiation therapy regimen or ADT use.« less
  • Purpose: To investigate the utility of endorectal coil magenetic resonance imaging (eMRI) in predicting biochemical relapse in prostate cancer patients treated with combination brachytherapy and external-beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between 2000 and 2008, 279 men with intermediate- or high-risk prostate cancer underwent eMRI of their prostate before receiving brachytherapy and supplemental intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Endorectal coil MRI was performed before treatment and retrospectively reviewed by two radiologists experienced in genitourinary MRI. Image-based variables, including tumor diameter, location, number of sextants involved, and the presence of extracapsular extension (ECE), were incorporated with other established clinical variables to predict biochemical control outcomes.more » The median follow-up was 49 months (range, 1-13 years). Results: The 5-year biochemical relapse-free survival for the cohort was 92%. Clinical findings predicting recurrence on univariate analysis included Gleason score (hazard ratio [HR] 3.6, p = 0.001), PSA (HR 1.04, p = 0.005), and National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk group (HR 4.1, p = 0.002). Clinical T stage and the use of androgen deprivation therapy were not correlated with biochemical failure. Imaging findings on univariate analysis associated with relapse included ECE on MRI (HR 3.79, p = 0.003), tumor size (HR 2.58, p = 0.04), and T stage (HR 1.71, p = 0.004). On multivariate analysis incorporating both clinical and imaging findings, only ECE on MRI and Gleason score were independent predictors of recurrence. Conclusions: Pretreatment eMRI findings predict for biochemical recurrence in intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with combination brachytherapy and external-beam radiotherapy. Gleason score and the presence of ECE on MRI were the only significant predictors of biochemical relapse in this group of patients.« less
  • Purpose: To determine the rate and magnitude of late genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities after salvage or adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer, and to determine predictive factors for these toxicities. Methods and Materials: A large multi-institutional database that included 959 men who received postoperative RT after radical prostatectomy (RP) was analyzed: 19% received adjuvant RT, 81% received salvage RT, 78% were treated to the prostate bed only, and 22% received radiation to the pelvis. Results: The median follow-up time was 55 months. At 5 years, 10% of patients had Grade 2 late GU toxicity and 1% had Grademore » 3 late GU toxicity, while 4% of patients had Grade 2 late GI toxicity and 0.4% had Grade 3 late GI toxicity. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that adjuvant RT (p = 0.03), androgen deprivation (p < 0.0001), and prostate bed-only RT (p = 0.007) predicted for Grade 2 or higher late GU toxicity. For GI toxicity, although adjuvant RT was significant in the univariate analysis, no significant factors were found in the multivariate analysis. Conclusions: Overall, the number of high-grade toxicities for postoperative RT was low. Therefore, adjuvant and salvage RT can safely be used in the appropriate settings.« less