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Title: Coal in a changing climate

Abstract

The NRDC analysis examines the changing climate for coal production and use in the United States and China, the world's two largest producers and consumers of coal. The authors say that the current coal fuel cycle is among the most destructive activities on earth, placing an unacceptable burden on public health and the environment. There is no such thing as 'clean coal.' Our highest priorities must be to avoid increased reliance on coal and to accelerate the transition to an energy future based on efficient use of renewable resources. Energy efficiency and renewable energy resources are technically capable of meeting the demands for energy services in countries that rely on coal. However, more than 500 conventional coal-fired power plants are expected in China in the next eight years alone, and more than 100 are under development in the United States. Because it is very likely that significant coal use will continue during the transition to renewables, it is important that we also take the necessary steps to minimize the destructive effects of coal use. That requires the U.S. and China to take steps now to end destructive mining practices and to apply state of the art pollution controls, including CO{submore » 2} control systems, to sources that use coal. Contents of the report are: Introduction; Background (Coal Production; Coal Use); The Toll from Coal (Environmental Effects of Coal Production; Environmental Effects of Coal Transportation); Environmental Effects of Coal Use (Air Pollutants; Other Pollutants; Environmental Effects of Coal Use in China); What Is the Future for Coal? (Reducing Fossil Fuel Dependence; Reducing the Impacts of Coal Production; Reducing Damage From Coal Use; Global Warming and Coal); and Conclusion. 2 tabs.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. (and others)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Resources Defense Council, New York, NY (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
20939429
Resource Type:
Miscellaneous
Resource Relation:
Other Information: IEACR LIB; Related Information: NRDC Issue Paper
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; USA; INTEREST GROUPS; COAL; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; CHINA; PRODUCTION; FUEL CONSUMPTION; TRANSPORT; AIR POLLUTION; GREENHOUSE EFFECT; CARBON DIOXIDE; FOSSIL-FUEL POWER PLANTS; REMOVAL; AIR POLLUTION CONTROL; MERCURY; SULFUR DIOXIDE; NITROGEN OXIDES; UNDERGROUND DISPOSAL; POWER GENERATION; HEALTH HAZARDS; OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES; COAL MINING; MORTALITY; HABITAT; DAMAGE; SURFACE MINING; LAND RECLAMATION; METHANE; DEFORESTATION; APPALACHIAN MOUNTAINS; TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS; LANDSCAPING; LONGWALL MINING; SPECIES DIVERSITY; WATER POLLUTION; LIQUID FUELS; RECOMMENDATIONS; CARBON SEQUESTRATION; CAPTURE; US EPA; POLLUTION REGULATIONS; PARTICULATES

Citation Formats

Lashof, D.A., Delano, D., and Devine, J. Coal in a changing climate. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Lashof, D.A., Delano, D., & Devine, J. Coal in a changing climate. United States.
Lashof, D.A., Delano, D., and Devine, J. Thu . "Coal in a changing climate". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_20939429,
title = {Coal in a changing climate},
author = {Lashof, D.A. and Delano, D. and Devine, J.},
abstractNote = {The NRDC analysis examines the changing climate for coal production and use in the United States and China, the world's two largest producers and consumers of coal. The authors say that the current coal fuel cycle is among the most destructive activities on earth, placing an unacceptable burden on public health and the environment. There is no such thing as 'clean coal.' Our highest priorities must be to avoid increased reliance on coal and to accelerate the transition to an energy future based on efficient use of renewable resources. Energy efficiency and renewable energy resources are technically capable of meeting the demands for energy services in countries that rely on coal. However, more than 500 conventional coal-fired power plants are expected in China in the next eight years alone, and more than 100 are under development in the United States. Because it is very likely that significant coal use will continue during the transition to renewables, it is important that we also take the necessary steps to minimize the destructive effects of coal use. That requires the U.S. and China to take steps now to end destructive mining practices and to apply state of the art pollution controls, including CO{sub 2} control systems, to sources that use coal. Contents of the report are: Introduction; Background (Coal Production; Coal Use); The Toll from Coal (Environmental Effects of Coal Production; Environmental Effects of Coal Transportation); Environmental Effects of Coal Use (Air Pollutants; Other Pollutants; Environmental Effects of Coal Use in China); What Is the Future for Coal? (Reducing Fossil Fuel Dependence; Reducing the Impacts of Coal Production; Reducing Damage From Coal Use; Global Warming and Coal); and Conclusion. 2 tabs.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Feb 15 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Feb 15 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

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