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Title: Detection potential for the diffuse supernova neutrino background in the large liquid-scintillator detector LENA

Abstract

The large-volume liquid-scintillator detector LENA (low energy neutrino astronomy) will provide high-grade background discrimination and enable the detection of diffuse supernova neutrinos (DSN) in an almost background-free energy window from {approx}10 to 25 MeV. Within ten years of exposure, it will be possible to derive significant constraints on both core-collapse supernova models and the supernova rate in the near universe up to redshifts z<2.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Physik-Department E15, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, James-Franck-Strasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany)
  2. Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Foehringer Ring 6, D-80805 Munich (Germany)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20935202
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. D, Particles Fields; Journal Volume: 75; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevD.75.023007; (c) 2007 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; ASTRONOMY; FREE ENERGY; LIQUID SCINTILLATORS; NEUTRINOS; RED SHIFT; SUPERNOVAE; UNIVERSE

Citation Formats

Wurm, M., Feilitzsch, F. von, Goeger-Neff, M., Undagoitia, T. Marrodan, Oberauer, L., Potzel, W., and Hochmuth, K. A. Detection potential for the diffuse supernova neutrino background in the large liquid-scintillator detector LENA. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.75.023007.
Wurm, M., Feilitzsch, F. von, Goeger-Neff, M., Undagoitia, T. Marrodan, Oberauer, L., Potzel, W., & Hochmuth, K. A. Detection potential for the diffuse supernova neutrino background in the large liquid-scintillator detector LENA. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.75.023007.
Wurm, M., Feilitzsch, F. von, Goeger-Neff, M., Undagoitia, T. Marrodan, Oberauer, L., Potzel, W., and Hochmuth, K. A. Mon . "Detection potential for the diffuse supernova neutrino background in the large liquid-scintillator detector LENA". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.75.023007.
@article{osti_20935202,
title = {Detection potential for the diffuse supernova neutrino background in the large liquid-scintillator detector LENA},
author = {Wurm, M. and Feilitzsch, F. von and Goeger-Neff, M. and Undagoitia, T. Marrodan and Oberauer, L. and Potzel, W. and Hochmuth, K. A.},
abstractNote = {The large-volume liquid-scintillator detector LENA (low energy neutrino astronomy) will provide high-grade background discrimination and enable the detection of diffuse supernova neutrinos (DSN) in an almost background-free energy window from {approx}10 to 25 MeV. Within ten years of exposure, it will be possible to derive significant constraints on both core-collapse supernova models and the supernova rate in the near universe up to redshifts z<2.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVD.75.023007},
journal = {Physical Review. D, Particles Fields},
number = 2,
volume = 75,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
  • The LENA (Low Energy Neutrino Astronomy) detector is proposed to be a large-volume liquid-scintillator device which will be highly suitable for the investigation of a variety of topics in astrophysics, geophysics and particle physics. In this paper, the potential of such a detector concerning the search for proton decay in the SUSY favored decay channel p{yields}K{sup +}{nu} is investigated. Based on Geant4, Monte Carlo simulations of the proton decay in the LENA detector as well as of the background radiation in the detection energy windows have been developed. From these simulations an efficiency of 65% for the detection of amore » possible proton decay has been determined. Within ten years of measuring time a lower limit for the proton lifetime, concerning the decay channel investigated, of {tau}>4x10{sup 34} y could be reached.« less
  • The large-volume liquid-scintillator detector LENA (Low Energy Neutrino Astronomy) will cover a broad field of physics. Apart from the detection of terrestrial and artificial neutrinos, and the search for proton decay, important contributions can be made to the astrophysics of stars by high-precision spectroscopy of low-energetic solar neutrinos and by the observation of neutrinos emitted by a galactic supernova. Moreover, the detection of the diffuse supernova neutrino background in LENA will offer the opportunity of studying both supernova core-collapse models and the supernova rate on cosmological timescales (z<2). Significant constraints can be derived after ten years of exposure, resulting inmore » {approx}100 {nu}-bar{sub e} events in an almost background-free energy window from {approx}10 to 25 MeV. The search for such rare low-energetic events takes advantage of the high energy resolution and excellent background rejection possible in the LENA detector.« less
  • Core-collapse supernovae produce an intense burst of electron antineutrinos in the few-tens-of-MeV range. Several Large Liquid Scintillator-based Detectors (LLSD) are currently operated worldwide, being very effective for low energy antineutrino detection through the Inverse Beta Decay (IBD) process. In this article, we develop a procedure for the prompt extraction of the supernova location by revisiting the details of IBD kinematics over the broad energy range of supernova neutrinos. Combining all current scintillator-based detector, we show that one can locate a canonical supernova at 10 kpc with an accuracy of 45 degrees (68% C.L.). After the addition of the next generationmore » of scintillator-based detectors, the accuracy could reach 12 degrees (68% C.L.), therefore reaching the performances of the large water ─îerenkov neutrino detectors. We also discuss a possible improvement of the SuperNova Early Warning System (SNEWS) inter-experiment network with the implementation of a directionality information in each experiment. Finally, we discuss the possibility to constrain the neutrino energy spectrum as well as the mass of the newly born neutron star with the LLSD data.« less
  • Supernovae are rare nearby, but they are not rare in the Universe, and all past core-collapse supernovae contributed to the diffuse supernova neutrino background (DSNB), for which the near-term detection prospects are very good. The Super-Kamiokande limit on the DSNB electron antineutrino flux, {phi}(E{sub {nu}}>19.3 MeV)<1.2 cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, is just above the range of recent theoretical predictions based on the measured star formation rate history. We show that the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory should be able to test the corresponding DSNB electron-neutrino flux with a sensitivity as low as {phi}(22.5<E{sub {nu}}<32.5 MeV){approx_equal}6 cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, improving the existingmore » Mont Blanc limit by about 3 orders of magnitude. While conventional supernova models predict comparable electron-neutrino and antineutrino fluxes, it is often considered that the first (and forward-directed) SN 1987A event in the Kamiokande-II detector should be attributed to electron-neutrino scattering with an electron, which would require a substantially enhanced electron-neutrino flux. We show that, with the required enhancements in either the burst or thermal phase {nu}{sub e} fluxes, the DSNB electron-neutrino flux would generally be detectable in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory. A direct experimental test could then resolve one of the enduring mysteries of SN 1987A: whether the first Kamiokande-II event reveals a serious misunderstanding of supernova physics or was simply an unlikely statistical fluctuation. Thus the electron-neutrino sensitivity of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory is an important complement to the electron antineutrino sensitivity of Super-Kamiokande in the quest to understand the DSNB.« less
  • It is shown that a large-volume liquid organic scintillator detector with an energy resolution of 10 keV at 200 keV (1{sigma}) will be sensitive to solar pp neutrinos, if operated at the target radiopurity levels for the Borexino detector or the solar neutrino project of KamLAND.