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Title: Impact of three years of data from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe on cosmological models with dynamical dark energy

Abstract

The first three years of observation of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) have provided the most precise data on the anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) to date. We investigate the impact of these results and their combination with data from other astrophysical probes on cosmological models with a dynamical dark energy component. By considering a wide range of such models, we find that the constraints on dynamical dark energy are significantly improved compared to the first year data.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Philosophenweg 16, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20935199
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. D, Particles Fields; Journal Volume: 75; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevD.75.023003; (c) 2007 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; ANISOTROPY; COSMIC RADIATION; COSMOLOGICAL MODELS; COSMOLOGY; NONLUMINOUS MATTER; RADIOWAVE RADIATION; RELICT RADIATION

Citation Formats

Doran, Michael, Robbers, Georg, and Wetterich, Christof. Impact of three years of data from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe on cosmological models with dynamical dark energy. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.75.023003.
Doran, Michael, Robbers, Georg, & Wetterich, Christof. Impact of three years of data from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe on cosmological models with dynamical dark energy. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.75.023003.
Doran, Michael, Robbers, Georg, and Wetterich, Christof. Mon . "Impact of three years of data from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe on cosmological models with dynamical dark energy". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.75.023003.
@article{osti_20935199,
title = {Impact of three years of data from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe on cosmological models with dynamical dark energy},
author = {Doran, Michael and Robbers, Georg and Wetterich, Christof},
abstractNote = {The first three years of observation of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) have provided the most precise data on the anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) to date. We investigate the impact of these results and their combination with data from other astrophysical probes on cosmological models with a dynamical dark energy component. By considering a wide range of such models, we find that the constraints on dynamical dark energy are significantly improved compared to the first year data.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVD.75.023003},
journal = {Physical Review. D, Particles Fields},
number = 2,
volume = 75,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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