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Title: Limits on neutron Lorentz violation from pulsar timing

Abstract

Pulsars are the most accurate naturally occurring clocks, and data about them can be used to set bounds on neutron-sector Lorentz violations. If SO(3) rotation symmetry is completely broken for neutrons, then pulsars' rotation speeds will vary periodically. Pulsar timing data limits the relevant Lorentz-violating coefficients to be smaller than 1.7x10{sup -8} at at least 90% confidence.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Department of Physics, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20935198
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. D, Particles Fields; Journal Volume: 75; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevD.75.023001; (c) 2007 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; LORENTZ INVARIANCE; NEUTRONS; PERIODICITY; PULSARS; ROTATION; SO-3 GROUPS; SYMMETRY

Citation Formats

Altschul, Brett. Limits on neutron Lorentz violation from pulsar timing. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.75.023001.
Altschul, Brett. Limits on neutron Lorentz violation from pulsar timing. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.75.023001.
Altschul, Brett. Mon . "Limits on neutron Lorentz violation from pulsar timing". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.75.023001.
@article{osti_20935198,
title = {Limits on neutron Lorentz violation from pulsar timing},
author = {Altschul, Brett},
abstractNote = {Pulsars are the most accurate naturally occurring clocks, and data about them can be used to set bounds on neutron-sector Lorentz violations. If SO(3) rotation symmetry is completely broken for neutrons, then pulsars' rotation speeds will vary periodically. Pulsar timing data limits the relevant Lorentz-violating coefficients to be smaller than 1.7x10{sup -8} at at least 90% confidence.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVD.75.023001},
journal = {Physical Review. D, Particles Fields},
number = 2,
volume = 75,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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  • No abstract prepared.