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Title: Black holes at the IceCube neutrino telescope

Abstract

If the fundamental Planck scale is about a TeV and the cosmic neutrino flux is at the Waxman-Bahcall level, quantum black holes are created daily in the Antarctic ice cap. We reexamine the prospects for observing such black holes with the IceCube neutrino-detection experiment. To this end, we first revise the black hole production rate by incorporating the effects of inelasticty, i.e., the energy radiated in gravitational waves by the multipole moments of the incoming shock waves. After that we study in detail the process of Hawking evaporation accounting for the black hole's large momentum in the lab system. We derive the energy spectrum of the Planckian cloud which is swept forward with a large, O(10{sup 6}), Lorentz factor. (It is noteworthy that the boosted thermal spectrum is also relevant for the study of near-extremal supersymmetric black holes, which could be copiously produced at the Large Hadron Collider.) In the semiclassical regime, we estimate the average energy of the boosted particles to be less than 20% the energy of the {nu} progenitor. Armed with such a constraint, we determine the discovery reach of IceCube by tagging on soft (relative to what one would expect from charged current standard model processes)more » muons escaping the electromagnetic shower bubble produced by the black hole's light descendants. The statistically significant 5{sigma} excess extends up to a quantum gravity scale {approx}1.3 TeV.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, P.O. Box 413, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20933278
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. D, Particles Fields; Journal Volume: 75; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevD.75.024011; (c) 2007 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; ANTARCTIC REGIONS; BLACK HOLES; CERN LHC; CHARGED CURRENTS; COSMIC NEUTRINOS; ENERGY SPECTRA; EVAPORATION; GRAVITATIONAL WAVES; MUONS; NEUTRINO DETECTION; QUANTUM GRAVITY; SEMICLASSICAL APPROXIMATION; SHOCK WAVES; STANDARD MODEL; SUPERSYMMETRY; TELESCOPES; TEV RANGE 01-10

Citation Formats

Anchordoqui, Luis A., Glenz, Matthew M., and Parker, Leonard. Black holes at the IceCube neutrino telescope. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.75.024011.
Anchordoqui, Luis A., Glenz, Matthew M., & Parker, Leonard. Black holes at the IceCube neutrino telescope. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.75.024011.
Anchordoqui, Luis A., Glenz, Matthew M., and Parker, Leonard. Mon . "Black holes at the IceCube neutrino telescope". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.75.024011.
@article{osti_20933278,
title = {Black holes at the IceCube neutrino telescope},
author = {Anchordoqui, Luis A. and Glenz, Matthew M. and Parker, Leonard},
abstractNote = {If the fundamental Planck scale is about a TeV and the cosmic neutrino flux is at the Waxman-Bahcall level, quantum black holes are created daily in the Antarctic ice cap. We reexamine the prospects for observing such black holes with the IceCube neutrino-detection experiment. To this end, we first revise the black hole production rate by incorporating the effects of inelasticty, i.e., the energy radiated in gravitational waves by the multipole moments of the incoming shock waves. After that we study in detail the process of Hawking evaporation accounting for the black hole's large momentum in the lab system. We derive the energy spectrum of the Planckian cloud which is swept forward with a large, O(10{sup 6}), Lorentz factor. (It is noteworthy that the boosted thermal spectrum is also relevant for the study of near-extremal supersymmetric black holes, which could be copiously produced at the Large Hadron Collider.) In the semiclassical regime, we estimate the average energy of the boosted particles to be less than 20% the energy of the {nu} progenitor. Armed with such a constraint, we determine the discovery reach of IceCube by tagging on soft (relative to what one would expect from charged current standard model processes) muons escaping the electromagnetic shower bubble produced by the black hole's light descendants. The statistically significant 5{sigma} excess extends up to a quantum gravity scale {approx}1.3 TeV.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVD.75.024011},
journal = {Physical Review. D, Particles Fields},
number = 2,
volume = 75,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}