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Title: Rapid, automated measurement of layer thicknesses on steel coin blanks using laser-induced-breakdown spectroscopy depth profiling

Abstract

We report application of a near-real-time method to determine layer thickness on electroplated coin blanks. The method was developed on a simple laser-induced-breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) arrangement by monitoring relative emission-line intensities from key probe elements via successive laser ablation shots. This is a unique LIBS application where no other current spectroscopic method (inductively coupled plasma or x-ray fluorescence) can be applied effectively. Method development is discussed, and results with precalibrated coins are presented.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20929658
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Optics; Journal Volume: 46; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: DOI: 10.1364/AO.46.000935; (c) 2007 Optical Society of America; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; ABLATION; BREAKDOWN; FLUORESCENCE; LASER MATERIALS; LASERS; LAYERS; MONITORING; PLASMA; SPECTROMETERS; SPECTROSCOPY; STEELS; THICKNESS

Citation Formats

Asimellis, George, Giannoudakos, Aggelos, and Kompitsas, Michael. Rapid, automated measurement of layer thicknesses on steel coin blanks using laser-induced-breakdown spectroscopy depth profiling. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1364/AO.46.000935.
Asimellis, George, Giannoudakos, Aggelos, & Kompitsas, Michael. Rapid, automated measurement of layer thicknesses on steel coin blanks using laser-induced-breakdown spectroscopy depth profiling. United States. doi:10.1364/AO.46.000935.
Asimellis, George, Giannoudakos, Aggelos, and Kompitsas, Michael. Tue . "Rapid, automated measurement of layer thicknesses on steel coin blanks using laser-induced-breakdown spectroscopy depth profiling". United States. doi:10.1364/AO.46.000935.
@article{osti_20929658,
title = {Rapid, automated measurement of layer thicknesses on steel coin blanks using laser-induced-breakdown spectroscopy depth profiling},
author = {Asimellis, George and Giannoudakos, Aggelos and Kompitsas, Michael},
abstractNote = {We report application of a near-real-time method to determine layer thickness on electroplated coin blanks. The method was developed on a simple laser-induced-breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) arrangement by monitoring relative emission-line intensities from key probe elements via successive laser ablation shots. This is a unique LIBS application where no other current spectroscopic method (inductively coupled plasma or x-ray fluorescence) can be applied effectively. Method development is discussed, and results with precalibrated coins are presented.},
doi = {10.1364/AO.46.000935},
journal = {Applied Optics},
number = 6,
volume = 46,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Feb 20 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Tue Feb 20 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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