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Title: Connecting (supersymmetry) CERN LHC measurements with high scale theories

Abstract

If supersymmetry is discovered at the LHC, the measured spectrum of superpartner masses and couplings will allow us to probe the origins of supersymmetry breaking. However, to connect the collider-scale Lagrangian soft parameters to the more fundamental theory from which they arise, it is usually necessary to evolve them to higher scales. The apparent unification of gauge couplings restricts the possible forms of new physics above the electroweak scale, and suggests that such an extrapolation is possible. Even so, this task is complicated if the low-scale spectrum is not measured completely or precisely, or if there is new physics at heavy scales beyond the reach of collider experiments. In this work we study some of these obstacles to running up, and we investigate how to get around them. Our main conclusion is that even though such obstacles can make it very difficult to accurately determine the values of all the soft parameters at the high scale, there exist a number of special combinations of the soft parameters that can avoid these difficulties. We also present a systematic application of our techniques in an explicit example.

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics (MCTP), Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)
  2. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20929580
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. D, Particles Fields; Journal Volume: 75; Journal Issue: 11; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevD.75.115018; (c) 2007 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; CERN LHC; EXTRAPOLATION; LAGRANGIAN FUNCTION; MASS; SUPERSYMMETRY; SYMMETRY BREAKING

Citation Formats

Kane, Gordon L., Kumar, Piyush, Morrissey, David E., Toharia, Manuel, and Department of Physics, Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York, 13244-1130. Connecting (supersymmetry) CERN LHC measurements with high scale theories. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.75.115018.
Kane, Gordon L., Kumar, Piyush, Morrissey, David E., Toharia, Manuel, & Department of Physics, Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York, 13244-1130. Connecting (supersymmetry) CERN LHC measurements with high scale theories. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.75.115018.
Kane, Gordon L., Kumar, Piyush, Morrissey, David E., Toharia, Manuel, and Department of Physics, Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York, 13244-1130. Fri . "Connecting (supersymmetry) CERN LHC measurements with high scale theories". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.75.115018.
@article{osti_20929580,
title = {Connecting (supersymmetry) CERN LHC measurements with high scale theories},
author = {Kane, Gordon L. and Kumar, Piyush and Morrissey, David E. and Toharia, Manuel and Department of Physics, Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York, 13244-1130},
abstractNote = {If supersymmetry is discovered at the LHC, the measured spectrum of superpartner masses and couplings will allow us to probe the origins of supersymmetry breaking. However, to connect the collider-scale Lagrangian soft parameters to the more fundamental theory from which they arise, it is usually necessary to evolve them to higher scales. The apparent unification of gauge couplings restricts the possible forms of new physics above the electroweak scale, and suggests that such an extrapolation is possible. Even so, this task is complicated if the low-scale spectrum is not measured completely or precisely, or if there is new physics at heavy scales beyond the reach of collider experiments. In this work we study some of these obstacles to running up, and we investigate how to get around them. Our main conclusion is that even though such obstacles can make it very difficult to accurately determine the values of all the soft parameters at the high scale, there exist a number of special combinations of the soft parameters that can avoid these difficulties. We also present a systematic application of our techniques in an explicit example.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVD.75.115018},
journal = {Physical Review. D, Particles Fields},
number = 11,
volume = 75,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Fri Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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