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Title: Historical emissions of black and organic carbon aerosol from energy-related combustion, 1850-2000 - article no. GB2018

Abstract

We present an emission inventory of primary black carbon (BC) and primary organic carbon (OC) aerosols from fossil fuel and biofuel combustion between 1850 and 2000. We reconstruct fossil fuel consumption and represent changes in technology on a national and sectoral basis. Our estimates rely on new estimates of biofuel consumption, and updated emission factors for old technologies. Emissions of black carbon increase almost linearly, totaling about 1000 Gg in 1850, 2200 Gg in 1900, 3000 Gg in 1950, and 4400 Gg in 2000. Primary organic carbon shows a similar pattern, with emissions of 4100 Gg, 5800 Gg, 6700 Gg, and 8700 Gg in 1850, 1900, 1950, and 2000, respectively. Biofuel is responsible for over half of BC emission until about 1890, and dominates energy-related primary OC emission throughout the entire period. Coal contributes the greatest fraction of BC emission between 1880 and 1975, and is overtaken by emissions from biofuel around 1975, and by diesel engines around 1990. Previous work suggests a rapid rise in BC emissions between 1950 and 2000. This work supports a more gradual increase between 1950 and 2000, similar to the increase between 1850 and 1925; implementation of clean technology is a primary reason.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. University of Illinois, Urbana, IL (USA). Dept. of Civil & Environmental Engineering
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20923888
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Global Biogeochemical Cycles; Journal Volume: 21; Journal Issue: 2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; HISTORICAL ASPECTS; EMISSION; CARBON; INVENTORIES; AEROSOLS; FOSSIL FUELS; BIOFUELS; COAL; DIESEL ENGINES; EXHAUST GASES; SOOT; COMBUSTION

Citation Formats

Bond, T.C., Bhardwaj, E., Dong, R., Jogani, R., Jung, S.K., Roden, C., Streets, D.G., and Trautmann, N.M. Historical emissions of black and organic carbon aerosol from energy-related combustion, 1850-2000 - article no. GB2018. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Bond, T.C., Bhardwaj, E., Dong, R., Jogani, R., Jung, S.K., Roden, C., Streets, D.G., & Trautmann, N.M. Historical emissions of black and organic carbon aerosol from energy-related combustion, 1850-2000 - article no. GB2018. United States.
Bond, T.C., Bhardwaj, E., Dong, R., Jogani, R., Jung, S.K., Roden, C., Streets, D.G., and Trautmann, N.M. Tue . "Historical emissions of black and organic carbon aerosol from energy-related combustion, 1850-2000 - article no. GB2018". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_20923888,
title = {Historical emissions of black and organic carbon aerosol from energy-related combustion, 1850-2000 - article no. GB2018},
author = {Bond, T.C. and Bhardwaj, E. and Dong, R. and Jogani, R. and Jung, S.K. and Roden, C. and Streets, D.G. and Trautmann, N.M.},
abstractNote = {We present an emission inventory of primary black carbon (BC) and primary organic carbon (OC) aerosols from fossil fuel and biofuel combustion between 1850 and 2000. We reconstruct fossil fuel consumption and represent changes in technology on a national and sectoral basis. Our estimates rely on new estimates of biofuel consumption, and updated emission factors for old technologies. Emissions of black carbon increase almost linearly, totaling about 1000 Gg in 1850, 2200 Gg in 1900, 3000 Gg in 1950, and 4400 Gg in 2000. Primary organic carbon shows a similar pattern, with emissions of 4100 Gg, 5800 Gg, 6700 Gg, and 8700 Gg in 1850, 1900, 1950, and 2000, respectively. Biofuel is responsible for over half of BC emission until about 1890, and dominates energy-related primary OC emission throughout the entire period. Coal contributes the greatest fraction of BC emission between 1880 and 1975, and is overtaken by emissions from biofuel around 1975, and by diesel engines around 1990. Previous work suggests a rapid rise in BC emissions between 1950 and 2000. This work supports a more gradual increase between 1950 and 2000, similar to the increase between 1850 and 1925; implementation of clean technology is a primary reason.},
doi = {},
journal = {Global Biogeochemical Cycles},
number = 2,
volume = 21,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Tue May 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}