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Title: Source apportionment of atmospheric PAHs in the Western Balkans by natural abundance radiocarbon analysis

Abstract

Progress in source apportionment of priority combustion-derived atmospheric pollutants can be made by an inverse approach to inventory emissions, namely, receptor-based compound class-specific radiocarbon analysis (CCSRA) of target pollutants. In the present study, CCSRA of the combustion-derived polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) present in the atmosphere of the countries of the former republic of Yugoslavia was performed. The carbon stable isotope composition ({delta}{sup 13}C) of PAHs varied between -27.68 and -27.19{per_thousand}, whereas {Delta}{sup 14}C values ranged from -568{per_thousand} for PAHs sampled in Kosovo to -288{per_thousand} for PAHs sampled in the Sarajevo area. The application of an isotopic mass balance model to these {Delta}{sup 14}C data revealed a significant contribution (35-65%) from the combustion of non-fossil material to the atmospheric PAH pollution, even in urban and industrialized areas. Furthermore, consistency was observed between the isotopic composition of PAHs obtained by high-volume sampling and those collected by passive sampling. This encourages the use of passive samplers for CCSRA applications. This marks the first time that a CCSRA investigation could be executed on a geographically wide scale, providing a quantitative field-based source apportionment, which points out that also non-fossil combustion processes should be targeted for remedial action. 36 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden). Department of Applied Environmental Science
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20905977
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environmental Science and Technology; Journal Volume: 41; Journal Issue: 11; Other Information: orjan.gustafsson@itm.su.se
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 02 PETROLEUM; 03 NATURAL GAS; 09 BIOMASS FUELS; POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS; AIR POLLUTION; COMBUSTION PRODUCTS; SERBIA; CROATIA; COAL; PETROLEUM; WOOD; CARBON 13; CARBON 14; PEAT; FOSSIL FUELS; FORESTS; FIRES; POLLUTION SOURCES; BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA; RURAL AREAS; URBAN AREAS; SAMPLING; AIR SAMPLERS; ISOTOPE RATIO; GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY

Citation Formats

Zdenek Zencak, Jana Klanova, Ivan Holoubek, and Oerjan Gustafsson. Source apportionment of atmospheric PAHs in the Western Balkans by natural abundance radiocarbon analysis. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1021/es0628957.
Zdenek Zencak, Jana Klanova, Ivan Holoubek, & Oerjan Gustafsson. Source apportionment of atmospheric PAHs in the Western Balkans by natural abundance radiocarbon analysis. United States. doi:10.1021/es0628957.
Zdenek Zencak, Jana Klanova, Ivan Holoubek, and Oerjan Gustafsson. Fri . "Source apportionment of atmospheric PAHs in the Western Balkans by natural abundance radiocarbon analysis". United States. doi:10.1021/es0628957.
@article{osti_20905977,
title = {Source apportionment of atmospheric PAHs in the Western Balkans by natural abundance radiocarbon analysis},
author = {Zdenek Zencak and Jana Klanova and Ivan Holoubek and Oerjan Gustafsson},
abstractNote = {Progress in source apportionment of priority combustion-derived atmospheric pollutants can be made by an inverse approach to inventory emissions, namely, receptor-based compound class-specific radiocarbon analysis (CCSRA) of target pollutants. In the present study, CCSRA of the combustion-derived polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) present in the atmosphere of the countries of the former republic of Yugoslavia was performed. The carbon stable isotope composition ({delta}{sup 13}C) of PAHs varied between -27.68 and -27.19{per_thousand}, whereas {Delta}{sup 14}C values ranged from -568{per_thousand} for PAHs sampled in Kosovo to -288{per_thousand} for PAHs sampled in the Sarajevo area. The application of an isotopic mass balance model to these {Delta}{sup 14}C data revealed a significant contribution (35-65%) from the combustion of non-fossil material to the atmospheric PAH pollution, even in urban and industrialized areas. Furthermore, consistency was observed between the isotopic composition of PAHs obtained by high-volume sampling and those collected by passive sampling. This encourages the use of passive samplers for CCSRA applications. This marks the first time that a CCSRA investigation could be executed on a geographically wide scale, providing a quantitative field-based source apportionment, which points out that also non-fossil combustion processes should be targeted for remedial action. 36 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.},
doi = {10.1021/es0628957},
journal = {Environmental Science and Technology},
number = 11,
volume = 41,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Fri Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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