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Title: Tracking new coal-fired power plants: coal's resurgence in electric power generation

Abstract

This information package is intended to provide an overview of 'Coal's resurgence in electric power generation' by examining proposed new coal-fired power plants that are under consideration in the USA. The results contained in this package are derived from information that is available from various tracking organizations and news groups. Although comprehensive, this information is not intended to represent every possible plant under consideration but is intended to illustrate the large potential that exists for new coal-fired power plants. It should be noted that many of the proposed plants are likely not to be built. For example, out of a total portfolio (gas, coal, etc.) of 500 GW of newly planned power plant capacity announced in 2001, 91 GW have been already been scrapped or delayed. 25 refs.

Publication Date:
Research Org.:
US Department of Energy (United States). National Energy Technology Laboratory
OSTI Identifier:
20905937
Resource Type:
Miscellaneous
Resource Relation:
Other Information: IEACR LIB
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; USA; COAL; CONSTRUCTION; PLANNING; FOSSIL-FUEL POWER PLANTS; CAPACITY; POWER GENERATION; FORECASTING; PROPOSALS; INVESTMENT

Citation Formats

NONE. Tracking new coal-fired power plants: coal's resurgence in electric power generation. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
NONE. Tracking new coal-fired power plants: coal's resurgence in electric power generation. United States.
NONE. Tue . "Tracking new coal-fired power plants: coal's resurgence in electric power generation". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_20905937,
title = {Tracking new coal-fired power plants: coal's resurgence in electric power generation},
author = {NONE},
abstractNote = {This information package is intended to provide an overview of 'Coal's resurgence in electric power generation' by examining proposed new coal-fired power plants that are under consideration in the USA. The results contained in this package are derived from information that is available from various tracking organizations and news groups. Although comprehensive, this information is not intended to represent every possible plant under consideration but is intended to illustrate the large potential that exists for new coal-fired power plants. It should be noted that many of the proposed plants are likely not to be built. For example, out of a total portfolio (gas, coal, etc.) of 500 GW of newly planned power plant capacity announced in 2001, 91 GW have been already been scrapped or delayed. 25 refs.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Tue May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Miscellaneous:
Other availability
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