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Title: Sonication-hydrothermal combination technique for the synthesis of titanate nanotubes from commercially available precursors

Abstract

Titanate nanotubes with inner diameters of 2-6 nm, outer diameters of 5-10 nm and lengths up to 600 nm were fabricated by directly using commercial TiO{sub 2} powders as the precursors via sonication-hydrothermal combination approach. The formation processes during sonication treatment under different sonication powers and times and hydrothermal treatment were studied by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) characterization. The chemical composition of the titanate nanotubes was determined in terms of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis. The influence of the particle size of the precursors on the formation processes was also examined. The tubular structure of the titanate nanotubes can be remained at the calcination temperature {<=}450 deg. C, but was completely destroyed at high calcination temperature 600 deg. C.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Key Laboratory of Photochemistry, Center for Molecular Science, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China)
  2. (China)
  3. Key Laboratory of Photochemistry, Center for Molecular Science, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China). E-mail: a1703@iccas.ac.cn
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20891613
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Materials Research Bulletin; Journal Volume: 41; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.materresbull.2005.08.020; PII: S0025-5408(05)00324-7; Copyright (c) 2005 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; CALCINATION; CHEMICAL COMPOSITION; CHEMICAL PREPARATION; NANOTUBES; PARTICLE SIZE; PRECURSOR; SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; TITANATES; TITANIUM OXIDES; TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; X-RAY DIFFRACTION; X-RAY SPECTROSCOPY

Citation Formats

Ma Yutao, Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039, Lin Yuan, Xiao Xurui, Zhou Xiaowen, and Li Xueping. Sonication-hydrothermal combination technique for the synthesis of titanate nanotubes from commercially available precursors. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Ma Yutao, Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039, Lin Yuan, Xiao Xurui, Zhou Xiaowen, & Li Xueping. Sonication-hydrothermal combination technique for the synthesis of titanate nanotubes from commercially available precursors. United States.
Ma Yutao, Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039, Lin Yuan, Xiao Xurui, Zhou Xiaowen, and Li Xueping. Thu . "Sonication-hydrothermal combination technique for the synthesis of titanate nanotubes from commercially available precursors". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_20891613,
title = {Sonication-hydrothermal combination technique for the synthesis of titanate nanotubes from commercially available precursors},
author = {Ma Yutao and Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 and Lin Yuan and Xiao Xurui and Zhou Xiaowen and Li Xueping},
abstractNote = {Titanate nanotubes with inner diameters of 2-6 nm, outer diameters of 5-10 nm and lengths up to 600 nm were fabricated by directly using commercial TiO{sub 2} powders as the precursors via sonication-hydrothermal combination approach. The formation processes during sonication treatment under different sonication powers and times and hydrothermal treatment were studied by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) characterization. The chemical composition of the titanate nanotubes was determined in terms of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis. The influence of the particle size of the precursors on the formation processes was also examined. The tubular structure of the titanate nanotubes can be remained at the calcination temperature {<=}450 deg. C, but was completely destroyed at high calcination temperature 600 deg. C.},
doi = {},
journal = {Materials Research Bulletin},
number = 2,
volume = 41,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Feb 02 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Thu Feb 02 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
  • Graphical abstract: This picture illustration for the formation process of TiO{sub 2}:Eu{sup 3+} nanorods and spindle-shaped nanoparticles. Display Omitted Highlights: ► TiO{sub 2}:Eu{sup 3+} nanorods and spindle-shaped nanoparticles were prepared. ► The nanotubes could transform to nanorods and spindle-shaped nanoparticles. ► The luminescence properties are dependent on the increases of the bandgap. -- Abstract: TiO{sub 2}:Eu{sup 3+} nanorods and spindle-shaped nanoparticles have been successfully prepared through simple calcination and hydrothermal process respectively using titanate as the precursors. On the basis of X-ray diffraction results, the as-obtained precursors are titanate (H{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 5}·H{sub 2}O), while nanorods and spindle-shaped nanoparticles aremore » pure anatase phase of TiO{sub 2}. TEM and SEM images show that the as-formed precursor could be transformed from nanotubes into nanorods and spindle-shaped nanoparticles by the calcination and hydrothermal process respectively. Under UV light excitation, both the TiO{sub 2}:Eu{sup 3+} nanorods and spindle-shaped nanoparticles exhibit the strong red emission. In addition, the luminescence intensity of TiO{sub 2}:Eu{sup 3+} nanorods is higher than that of TiO{sub 2}:Eu{sup 3+} spindle-shaped nanoparticles due to the increases of the bandgap of the TiO{sub 2} nanorods.« less
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