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Title: Canada's coal industry: full swing ahead

Abstract

The article presents facts and figures about Canada's coal industry in 2006 including production, exports, imports, mines in operation, the Genesee 3 coal-fired generation unit, the Dodds-Roundhill Gasification Project, and new coal mine development plans. The outlook for 2007 is positive, with coal production expected to increase from 67 Mt in 2006 to 70 Mt in 2007 and exports expected to increase from 28 Mt in 2006 to 30 Mt in 2007.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Natural Resources Canada (Canada). Minerals and Metals Sector
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20885836
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Coal People; Journal Volume: 29; Journal Issue: 8; Other Information: kstone@nrcan.gc.ca
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; CANADA; COAL INDUSTRY; COAL; POWER GENERATION; COAL MINING; COAL GASIFICATION; COAL LIQUEFACTION; FORECASTING; PRODUCTION; IMPORTS; EXPORTS; TRADE; MARKET

Citation Formats

Stone, K. Canada's coal industry: full swing ahead. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Stone, K. Canada's coal industry: full swing ahead. United States.
Stone, K. Thu . "Canada's coal industry: full swing ahead". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_20885836,
title = {Canada's coal industry: full swing ahead},
author = {Stone, K.},
abstractNote = {The article presents facts and figures about Canada's coal industry in 2006 including production, exports, imports, mines in operation, the Genesee 3 coal-fired generation unit, the Dodds-Roundhill Gasification Project, and new coal mine development plans. The outlook for 2007 is positive, with coal production expected to increase from 67 Mt in 2006 to 70 Mt in 2007 and exports expected to increase from 28 Mt in 2006 to 30 Mt in 2007.},
doi = {},
journal = {Coal People},
number = 8,
volume = 29,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Mar 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Thu Mar 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
  • Statistics of 1978 indicate record levels of production, consumption, and trade. Canadian production rose to 33,600,000 tons, up 6% from 31,600,000 tons in 1977, while domestic consumption grew to a new high of 35,000,000 tons. Exports rose to 15,400,000 tons, up 13% from 1977. Coking coals account for over 90% of all exports and Japan is Canada's main coking coal customer receiving 12,000,000 tons in 1978. Primarily because of strikes in the United States coal industry, US coal imports to Canada fell to 15,500,000 tons in 1978, down 9% from 17,000,000 in 1977. While 1979 imports should exceed those ofmore » 1978, exports are also forecast to grow so that Canada's coal trade could again be in balance in 1979. Overall production and consumption is expected to increase by close to 10% in 1979 in response to increased use of steam coal in existing and new thermal electric generating stations, and in response to a growing worldwide coking and thermal coal demand. Figures for 1980 are likely to exceed those of 1979 by a further 10%.« less
  • In the absence of immediate new sales prospects in the export market, the near-term fortunes of the Canadian coal industry will depend upon an increase in domestic coal consumption, especially of thermal coal. Accordingly, the renaissance of Canadian coal, forecast for the late 1970s, will probably not materialize until the mid-1980s. Since markets for western Canadian metallurgical coal, mostly in Japan, have huge stockpiles, there appears to be no sign of recovery in the demand for coking coal until the early 1980s. However, coal producers have had some success in diversifying their coal sales. Canada's geography helps make it bothmore » a major producer and importer of coal, since Western coals are exported while Ontario uses U.S. imports due to lower landed costs. Canada's coal production in 1978 is expected to remain fairly steady at levels similar to those in 1977, when they reached about 28,500,000 metric tons, of which British Columbia and Alberta provided almost 21,000,000 tons. Output in 1976 was 25,400,000 tons. Some legislative changes, such as higher royalties in British Columbia and rigid environmental measures in Alberta (the two provinces that produce the bulk of Canada's coal) have helped to slow the industry's momentum.« less
  • Information is given on Polish coal reserves showing the types of coal in different regions. Long-range plans for the industry have been formulated, calling for the opening of many new mines during the next 50 years. Coal exports have played an important part in the country's economy by providing hard currency. Exports were 41.4 million tons in 1979, but fell to 31 million tons in 1980 as a result of the country's domestic problems. It is hoped to recapture the export market.
  • An information revolution reflects the atmosphere in Canada in which information is collected and disseminated and which affects the socio-economic and cultural structure. Technological breakthroughs in digital communication networks, communications satellites, computerized information banks, and two-way home services using fiber optics are among the new developments that are technically and economically feasible. The regulatory framework is no longer able to keep pace with innovative change and the industry feels it is restricting market opportunities. The flow of information across national borders has also increased in volume, raising questions of national privacy, sovereignty, dependency, and even security. (DCK)