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Title: The coal-wind connection

Abstract

The USA now has more than 10,000 MW of wind capacity and more wind farms are expected to be built. However transmissions constraints are great, especially in the Northwest and upper Midwest, where abundant wind resources span sparsely populated regions. These areas also hold major deposits of coal. Partnerships are being developed to share transmission to accommodate both new wind and new coal-fired capacity. Wyoming may well be the epicentre of the issue. Another idea, in wind-prone Texas, is to further integrate wind with baseload fossil power resources by creation of competitive renewable energy zones (CREZs). New transmission corridors will be set up linking the renewable energy zones to power markets in ERCOT, the Electric Reliability Council of Texas. There are problems of co-developing coal and wind capacity with common transmission. If coal gasification technology emerges on a commercial scale there would be a good opportunity for integrated gasification combined cycle which can cycle to firm up variable wind generation. Several coal companies in Wyoming are considering gasifying coal and putting it into the pipeline. 2 photos.

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20885816
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Power Engineering (Barrington); Journal Volume: 111; Journal Issue: 1
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; 01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; COAL; WIND POWER; USA; POWER TRANSMISSION; CAPACITY; COOPERATION; COAL GASIFICATION; COMBINED-CYCLE POWER PLANTS; TEXAS; ROCKY MOUNTAINS; WYOMING; PLANNING; WIND TURBINE ARRAYS; POWER TRANSMISSION LINES; RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES; RESOURCE EXPLOITATION; POWER DISTRIBUTION

Citation Formats

Blankinship, S. The coal-wind connection. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Blankinship, S. The coal-wind connection. United States.
Blankinship, S. Mon . "The coal-wind connection". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_20885816,
title = {The coal-wind connection},
author = {Blankinship, S.},
abstractNote = {The USA now has more than 10,000 MW of wind capacity and more wind farms are expected to be built. However transmissions constraints are great, especially in the Northwest and upper Midwest, where abundant wind resources span sparsely populated regions. These areas also hold major deposits of coal. Partnerships are being developed to share transmission to accommodate both new wind and new coal-fired capacity. Wyoming may well be the epicentre of the issue. Another idea, in wind-prone Texas, is to further integrate wind with baseload fossil power resources by creation of competitive renewable energy zones (CREZs). New transmission corridors will be set up linking the renewable energy zones to power markets in ERCOT, the Electric Reliability Council of Texas. There are problems of co-developing coal and wind capacity with common transmission. If coal gasification technology emerges on a commercial scale there would be a good opportunity for integrated gasification combined cycle which can cycle to firm up variable wind generation. Several coal companies in Wyoming are considering gasifying coal and putting it into the pipeline. 2 photos.},
doi = {},
journal = {Power Engineering (Barrington)},
number = 1,
volume = 111,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
  • This Chapter presents a comprehensive overview of the present state of the wind energy field. After an introduction of the history of wind exploitation, wind resource assessment and wind turbine operating principles are reviewed. The present state-of-the-art of wind turbine generators is discussed, together with other aspects, such as technical, social, and environmental factors that influence the wind plant development; the various elements of energy costs; and the economic value of wind-generated electricity. The last part of the review provides data on presently installed wind plants and the wind turbine market worldwide. It then delineates the various possible policies throughmore » which governments can provide incentives to wind plant installation, and it forecasts the possible growth of the sector by considering the targets set by programs in a number of countries. 44 refs., 44 figs., 3 tabs.« less
  • A three level control system for a variable speed wind energy conversion scheme (VSWECS) supplying a weak AC system is presented. The objective of the control strategy is to maximize energy capture and simultaneously to support the voltage of the bus where the VSWECS is connected. Using an insulated gate bipolar transistors (IGBT) inverter both control of active and reactive power supplied to the grid and reduction of harmonic distortion can be achieved. The response of the proposed scheme has been tested and evaluated in a test system using a developed computer program simulating in detail the system operation.
  • One of the most interesting discoveries from Hinode is the presence of persistent high-temperature high-speed outflows from the edges of active regions (ARs). EUV imaging spectrometer (EIS) measurements indicate that the outflows reach velocities of 50 km s{sup -1} with spectral line asymmetries approaching 200 km s{sup -1}. It has been suggested that these outflows may lie on open field lines that connect to the heliosphere, and that they could potentially be a significant source of the slow speed solar wind. A direct link has been difficult to establish, however. We use EIS measurements of spectral line intensities that aremore » sensitive to changes in the relative abundance of Si and S as a result of the first ionization potential (FIP) effect, to measure the chemical composition in the outflow regions of AR 10978 over a 5 day period in 2007 December. We find that Si is always enhanced over S by a factor of 3-4. This is generally consistent with the enhancement factor of low FIP elements measured in situ in the slow solar wind by non-spectroscopic methods. Plasma with a slow wind-like composition was therefore flowing from the edge of the AR for at least 5 days. Furthermore, on December 10 and 11, when the outflow from the western side was favorably oriented in the Earth direction, the Si/S ratio was found to match the value measured a few days later by the Advanced Composition Explorer/Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer. These results provide strong observational evidence for a direct connection between the solar wind, and the coronal plasma in the outflow regions.« less