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Title: Near-term capital spending in the North American power industry

Abstract

The article provides a snapshot of activity in the four distinct North American electric power generation niches - coal, nuclear, gas and renewables. Consideration of capacity and investment levels are a viable way of comparing growth trends. Coal still remains the fuel of choice for most new North American units. Between now and 2010 some 25 coal-fired units are scheduled to come on-line; another 246 units are in earlier stages of development. In 2005, spending on renewable energy development surpassed investment in gas-fired unit construction for the first time. 4 photos.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Industrial Info Resources (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20885805
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Power (New York); Journal Volume: 151; Journal Issue: 1
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; NORTH AMERICA; POWER GENERATION; ELECTRIC POWER INDUSTRY; FORECASTING; INVESTMENT; COAL; NUCLEAR POWER; NATURAL GAS; RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES; USA; CAPACITY; CANADA

Citation Formats

Burt, B., and Mullins, S. Near-term capital spending in the North American power industry. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Burt, B., & Mullins, S. Near-term capital spending in the North American power industry. United States.
Burt, B., and Mullins, S. Mon . "Near-term capital spending in the North American power industry". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_20885805,
title = {Near-term capital spending in the North American power industry},
author = {Burt, B. and Mullins, S.},
abstractNote = {The article provides a snapshot of activity in the four distinct North American electric power generation niches - coal, nuclear, gas and renewables. Consideration of capacity and investment levels are a viable way of comparing growth trends. Coal still remains the fuel of choice for most new North American units. Between now and 2010 some 25 coal-fired units are scheduled to come on-line; another 246 units are in earlier stages of development. In 2005, spending on renewable energy development surpassed investment in gas-fired unit construction for the first time. 4 photos.},
doi = {},
journal = {Power (New York)},
number = 1,
volume = 151,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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