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Title: Investment in generation is heavy, but important needs remain

Abstract

Forecasting the direction of the US electric power industry for 2007, much less the distant future, is like defining a velocity vector; doing so requires a direction and speed to delineate progress. In this special report, the paper looks at current industry indicators and draws conclusions based on more than 100 years of experience. To borrow verbatim the title of basketball legend Charles Barkely's book 'I may be wrong but I doubt it'. The forecast takes into consideration USDOE's National Electric Transmission Congestion Study (August 2006),a summary of industry data prepared by Industrial Info Resources (IIR) and NERC's 2006 Long-Term Reliability Assessment (October 2006). It also reports opinions of industry specialists. 3 figs., 4 tabs.

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20885804
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Power (New York); Journal Volume: 151; Journal Issue: 1
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; USA; ELECTRIC POWER INDUSTRY; POWER GENERATION; CAPACITY; FORECASTING; COST; FOSSIL FUELS; COAL; PULVERIZED FUELS; NATURAL GAS; NUCLEAR POWER; SECURITY; RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES; WIND POWER; LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS; GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; POLITICAL ASPECTS; US DOE; POWER TRANSMISSION; POWER DISTRIBUTION; CARBON DIOXIDE

Citation Formats

Maize, K. Investment in generation is heavy, but important needs remain. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Maize, K. Investment in generation is heavy, but important needs remain. United States.
Maize, K. 2007. "Investment in generation is heavy, but important needs remain". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_20885804,
title = {Investment in generation is heavy, but important needs remain},
author = {Maize, K.},
abstractNote = {Forecasting the direction of the US electric power industry for 2007, much less the distant future, is like defining a velocity vector; doing so requires a direction and speed to delineate progress. In this special report, the paper looks at current industry indicators and draws conclusions based on more than 100 years of experience. To borrow verbatim the title of basketball legend Charles Barkely's book 'I may be wrong but I doubt it'. The forecast takes into consideration USDOE's National Electric Transmission Congestion Study (August 2006),a summary of industry data prepared by Industrial Info Resources (IIR) and NERC's 2006 Long-Term Reliability Assessment (October 2006). It also reports opinions of industry specialists. 3 figs., 4 tabs.},
doi = {},
journal = {Power (New York)},
number = 1,
volume = 151,
place = {United States},
year = 2007,
month = 1
}
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