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Title: Modeling source contributions to submicron particle number concentrations measured in Rochester, New York

Abstract

An advanced receptor model was used to elicit source information based on ambient submicron (0.01-0.47 {mu}m) particle number concentrations, gaseous species, and meteorological variables measured at the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation central monitoring site in Rochester, NY. Four seasonal data sets (winter, spring, summer, and fall) were independently investigated. A total of ten different sources were identified, including two traffic factors, two nucleation factors, industrial emissions, residential/commercial heating, secondary nitrate, secondary sulfate, ozone-rich secondary aerosol, and regionally transported aerosol. The resolved sources were generally characterized by similar number modes for either winter, spring, summer or fall. The size distributions for nucleation were dominated by the smallest particles ({lt}10-30 nm) that gradually grew to larger sizes as could be seen by observing the volume profiles. In addition, the nucleation factors were closely linked to traffic rush hours suggesting that cooling of tail-pipe emissions may have induced nucleation activity in the vicinity of the highways. Industrial emissions were dominated by emissions from coal-fired power plants that were located to the northwest of the sampling site. These facilities represent the largest point emission sources of SO{sub 2}, and probably ultrafine ({lt}0.1 {mu}m) or submicron particles, in Rochester. Regionally transported materialmore » was characterized by accumulation mode particles. Air parcel back-trajectories showed transport of air masses from the industrial midwest.« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20885799
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Aerosol Science and Technology; Journal Volume: 41; Journal Issue: 2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; USA; URBAN AREAS; NEW YORK; AIR POLLUTION; POLLUTION SOURCES; SEASONAL VARIATIONS; PARTICLE SIZE; VEHICLES; FOSSIL-FUEL POWER PLANTS; COAL

Citation Formats

Ogulei, D., Hopke, P.K., Chalupa, D.C., and Utell, M.J. Modeling source contributions to submicron particle number concentrations measured in Rochester, New York. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1080/02786820601116012.
Ogulei, D., Hopke, P.K., Chalupa, D.C., & Utell, M.J. Modeling source contributions to submicron particle number concentrations measured in Rochester, New York. United States. doi:10.1080/02786820601116012.
Ogulei, D., Hopke, P.K., Chalupa, D.C., and Utell, M.J. Thu . "Modeling source contributions to submicron particle number concentrations measured in Rochester, New York". United States. doi:10.1080/02786820601116012.
@article{osti_20885799,
title = {Modeling source contributions to submicron particle number concentrations measured in Rochester, New York},
author = {Ogulei, D. and Hopke, P.K. and Chalupa, D.C. and Utell, M.J.},
abstractNote = {An advanced receptor model was used to elicit source information based on ambient submicron (0.01-0.47 {mu}m) particle number concentrations, gaseous species, and meteorological variables measured at the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation central monitoring site in Rochester, NY. Four seasonal data sets (winter, spring, summer, and fall) were independently investigated. A total of ten different sources were identified, including two traffic factors, two nucleation factors, industrial emissions, residential/commercial heating, secondary nitrate, secondary sulfate, ozone-rich secondary aerosol, and regionally transported aerosol. The resolved sources were generally characterized by similar number modes for either winter, spring, summer or fall. The size distributions for nucleation were dominated by the smallest particles ({lt}10-30 nm) that gradually grew to larger sizes as could be seen by observing the volume profiles. In addition, the nucleation factors were closely linked to traffic rush hours suggesting that cooling of tail-pipe emissions may have induced nucleation activity in the vicinity of the highways. Industrial emissions were dominated by emissions from coal-fired power plants that were located to the northwest of the sampling site. These facilities represent the largest point emission sources of SO{sub 2}, and probably ultrafine ({lt}0.1 {mu}m) or submicron particles, in Rochester. Regionally transported material was characterized by accumulation mode particles. Air parcel back-trajectories showed transport of air masses from the industrial midwest.},
doi = {10.1080/02786820601116012},
journal = {Aerosol Science and Technology},
number = 2,
volume = 41,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Feb 15 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Feb 15 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}