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Title: Mineral matter identification in Nallihan lignite by leaching with mineral acids

Abstract

Coals are heterogeneous, complex noncrystalline macromolecules having both organic and inorganic materials that contain some inorganic constituents. Some techniques have been applied to this fossil fuel in order to remove these undesired inorganic parts from the organic part. Chemical demineralization is one of the suitable methods for removal of inorganic elements although it is an expensive way. But by this method, many elements are leached effectively from the lignite body from the point of economic view because these inorganic parts may cause some undesired deleterious effects. In this study, the demineralization effect of some aqueous acids of 5% such as HCl, H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, HNO{sub 3}, and HF was studied. The effect of these mineral acids was shown by X-ray spectroscopy.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Yildiz Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20885780
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Energy Sources, Part A: Recovery, Utilization, and Environmental Effects; Journal Volume: 29; Journal Issue: 3
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; LIGNITE; DEMINERALIZATION; LEACHING; HYDROCHLORIC ACID; SULFURIC ACID; NITRIC ACID; HYDROFLUORIC ACID; INORGANIC ACIDS; MINERALS; X-RAY SPECTROSCOPY; MINERALOGY

Citation Formats

Gulen, J. Mineral matter identification in Nallihan lignite by leaching with mineral acids. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1080/009083190965514.
Gulen, J. Mineral matter identification in Nallihan lignite by leaching with mineral acids. United States. doi:10.1080/009083190965514.
Gulen, J. Thu . "Mineral matter identification in Nallihan lignite by leaching with mineral acids". United States. doi:10.1080/009083190965514.
@article{osti_20885780,
title = {Mineral matter identification in Nallihan lignite by leaching with mineral acids},
author = {Gulen, J.},
abstractNote = {Coals are heterogeneous, complex noncrystalline macromolecules having both organic and inorganic materials that contain some inorganic constituents. Some techniques have been applied to this fossil fuel in order to remove these undesired inorganic parts from the organic part. Chemical demineralization is one of the suitable methods for removal of inorganic elements although it is an expensive way. But by this method, many elements are leached effectively from the lignite body from the point of economic view because these inorganic parts may cause some undesired deleterious effects. In this study, the demineralization effect of some aqueous acids of 5% such as HCl, H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, HNO{sub 3}, and HF was studied. The effect of these mineral acids was shown by X-ray spectroscopy.},
doi = {10.1080/009083190965514},
journal = {Energy Sources, Part A: Recovery, Utilization, and Environmental Effects},
number = 3,
volume = 29,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Feb 15 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Feb 15 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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