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Title: Stable plume rise in a shear layer

Abstract

Solutions are given for plume rise assuming a power-law wind speed profile in a stably stratified layer for point and finite sources with initial vertical momentum and buoyancy. For a constant wind speed, these solutions simplify to the conventional plume rise equations in a stable atmosphere. In a shear layer, the point of maximum rise occurs further downwind and is slightly lower compared with the plume rise with a constant wind speed equal to the wind speed at the top of the stack. If the predictions with shear are compared with predictions for an equivalent average wind speed over the depth of the plume, the plume rise with shear is higher than plume rise with an equivalent average wind speed. 7 refs., 2 figs.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Clemson University, Anderson, SC (United States). Department of Environmental Engineering and Science
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20885755
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of the Air and Waste Management Association; Journal Volume: 57; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: tjvrc@clemson.edu
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; PLUMES; PREDICTION EQUATIONS; WIND; VELOCITY; FOSSIL-FUEL POWER PLANTS; INDUSTRIAL PLANTS; POINT POLLUTANT SOURCES; NUMERICAL SOLUTION; STACK DISPOSAL; ENVIRONMENTAL TRANSPORT; METEOROLOGY; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; SHEAR; GAS FLOW; FLOW MODELS; HEIGHT

Citation Formats

Overcamp, T.J. Stable plume rise in a shear layer. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1080/10473289.2007.10465338.
Overcamp, T.J. Stable plume rise in a shear layer. United States. doi:10.1080/10473289.2007.10465338.
Overcamp, T.J. Thu . "Stable plume rise in a shear layer". United States. doi:10.1080/10473289.2007.10465338.
@article{osti_20885755,
title = {Stable plume rise in a shear layer},
author = {Overcamp, T.J.},
abstractNote = {Solutions are given for plume rise assuming a power-law wind speed profile in a stably stratified layer for point and finite sources with initial vertical momentum and buoyancy. For a constant wind speed, these solutions simplify to the conventional plume rise equations in a stable atmosphere. In a shear layer, the point of maximum rise occurs further downwind and is slightly lower compared with the plume rise with a constant wind speed equal to the wind speed at the top of the stack. If the predictions with shear are compared with predictions for an equivalent average wind speed over the depth of the plume, the plume rise with shear is higher than plume rise with an equivalent average wind speed. 7 refs., 2 figs.},
doi = {10.1080/10473289.2007.10465338},
journal = {Journal of the Air and Waste Management Association},
number = 3,
volume = 57,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Mar 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Thu Mar 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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