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Title: Recent trends of energy consumption and air pollution in China

Abstract

The relationship between air pollution and energy consumption is a hot topic that is receiving increased attention by industry, regulatory agencies, as well as the public. China is currently undergoing a profound economic and social transition. Since the late 1990s, China's energy production and consumption have undergone an unexpectedly precipitous up-and-down fluctuation, and the related air pollution has changed dramatically. In this study, energy use and the related air pollution during the past years are analyzed and discussed in detail. Further, suggestions on sustainable energy use, air pollution control, as well as CO{sub 2}, abatement are proposed. By 2003, the total primary energy consumption of China had reached 1678.00 million tons (MT) of standard coal equivalent. As a result, emissions of SO{sub 2}, and NOx increased to 21.58 and 16.13 MT in 2003, respectively. Acid rain pollution worsened nationwide after 2000, with the areas of acid rain remaining stable while some seriously acid rain polluted areas worsened. This implies that more rigorous regulations, standards, and effective economic policies are needed.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. Tsing Hua University, Beijing (China). Inst. of Environmental Science & Engineering
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20885745
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Energy Engineering; Journal Volume: 133; Journal Issue: 1
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; CHINA; ENERGY CONSUMPTION; AIR POLLUTION; CORRELATIONS; AIR POLLUTION CONTROL; AIR POLLUTION ABATEMENT; CARBON DIOXIDE; SULFUR DIOXIDE; NITROGEN OXIDES; ACID RAIN; COAL

Citation Formats

Tian, H.Z., Hao, J.M., Hu, M.Y., and Nie, Y.F.. Recent trends of energy consumption and air pollution in China. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1061/(ASCE)0733-9402(2007)133:1(4).
Tian, H.Z., Hao, J.M., Hu, M.Y., & Nie, Y.F.. Recent trends of energy consumption and air pollution in China. United States. doi:10.1061/(ASCE)0733-9402(2007)133:1(4).
Tian, H.Z., Hao, J.M., Hu, M.Y., and Nie, Y.F.. Thu . "Recent trends of energy consumption and air pollution in China". United States. doi:10.1061/(ASCE)0733-9402(2007)133:1(4).
@article{osti_20885745,
title = {Recent trends of energy consumption and air pollution in China},
author = {Tian, H.Z. and Hao, J.M. and Hu, M.Y. and Nie, Y.F.},
abstractNote = {The relationship between air pollution and energy consumption is a hot topic that is receiving increased attention by industry, regulatory agencies, as well as the public. China is currently undergoing a profound economic and social transition. Since the late 1990s, China's energy production and consumption have undergone an unexpectedly precipitous up-and-down fluctuation, and the related air pollution has changed dramatically. In this study, energy use and the related air pollution during the past years are analyzed and discussed in detail. Further, suggestions on sustainable energy use, air pollution control, as well as CO{sub 2}, abatement are proposed. By 2003, the total primary energy consumption of China had reached 1678.00 million tons (MT) of standard coal equivalent. As a result, emissions of SO{sub 2}, and NOx increased to 21.58 and 16.13 MT in 2003, respectively. Acid rain pollution worsened nationwide after 2000, with the areas of acid rain remaining stable while some seriously acid rain polluted areas worsened. This implies that more rigorous regulations, standards, and effective economic policies are needed.},
doi = {10.1061/(ASCE)0733-9402(2007)133:1(4)},
journal = {Journal of Energy Engineering},
number = 1,
volume = 133,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Mar 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Thu Mar 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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