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Title: Kinetic studies of the liquid-phase adsorption of a reactive dye onto activated lignite

Abstract

The kinetics of batch adsorption of a commercial reactive dye onto activated lignite has been investigated at temperatures of 26, 40, and 55{sup o}C, using aqueous solutions with initial dye concentrations in the range of 15-60 mg/L. An empirical single parameter relationship of the adsorbent loading versus the square root of contact time was proposed, which was determined to provide a very good description of the batch adsorption transients up to equilibrium. The data were also examined by means of the Elovich equation. The effect of the temperature and the initial dye concentration on the adsorption kinetics was analyzed, and the results were discussed by considering that intraparticle diffusion is the dominant mechanism.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Democritus University of Thrace, Xanthi (Greece)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20885707
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Research; Journal Volume: 46; Journal Issue: 4
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; LIGNITE; ADSORPTION; DYES; ACTIVATED CARBON; AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS; ADSORBENTS; KINETICS; TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE; SORPTIVE PROPERTIES

Citation Formats

Petrolekas, P.D., and Maggenakis, G. Kinetic studies of the liquid-phase adsorption of a reactive dye onto activated lignite. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1021/ie061222u.
Petrolekas, P.D., & Maggenakis, G. Kinetic studies of the liquid-phase adsorption of a reactive dye onto activated lignite. United States. doi:10.1021/ie061222u.
Petrolekas, P.D., and Maggenakis, G. Wed . "Kinetic studies of the liquid-phase adsorption of a reactive dye onto activated lignite". United States. doi:10.1021/ie061222u.
@article{osti_20885707,
title = {Kinetic studies of the liquid-phase adsorption of a reactive dye onto activated lignite},
author = {Petrolekas, P.D. and Maggenakis, G.},
abstractNote = {The kinetics of batch adsorption of a commercial reactive dye onto activated lignite has been investigated at temperatures of 26, 40, and 55{sup o}C, using aqueous solutions with initial dye concentrations in the range of 15-60 mg/L. An empirical single parameter relationship of the adsorbent loading versus the square root of contact time was proposed, which was determined to provide a very good description of the batch adsorption transients up to equilibrium. The data were also examined by means of the Elovich equation. The effect of the temperature and the initial dye concentration on the adsorption kinetics was analyzed, and the results were discussed by considering that intraparticle diffusion is the dominant mechanism.},
doi = {10.1021/ie061222u},
journal = {Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Research},
number = 4,
volume = 46,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Feb 14 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Wed Feb 14 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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